Black Panthers

Black Panthers at 50: Reflections on their legacy

Black Panther logo

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense, founded in Oakland, California. I went to the Oakland Museum of California to see the exhibit "All Power to the People: Black Panthers at 50" and it got me to reflect on how the Panthers and other movements of that era affected many radical projects that continued in their legacy.

Building Working-Class Defense Organizations: An Interview with the Twin Cities GDC

First of May Anarchist Alliance interviewed Erik D., Secretary of Twin Cities IWW-General Defense Committee (GDC) Local 14. The GDC which has grown to approximately 100 members in Minnesota has become an important pole of struggle for pro-working-class revolutionaries on a number of different fronts, most significantly the year-long struggle against police killings and brutality.

Critique of the "gay demands" - The Red Butterfly

A communiqué issued by the revolutionary socialist cell within the Gay Liberation Front critiquing what they saw as "gay nationalism" and "extreme segregationism" in a document called "gay demands" issued at the Black Panther Party's “Revolutionary People's Constitutional Convention Planning Session” in Philadelphia, 5 September 1970. It was distributed at a follow-up BPP convention in Washington DC in November. While we may not agree with all of it, particularly the passages which slip into transphobia, we reproduce it here for reference.

The Women's Liberation and Gay Liberation Movements

Speech given by Huey Newton, founder of the Black Panthers, August 15, 1970. The speech criticises previous attitudes of the Black Panther Party and revolutionary groups towards homosexuals and women, and stresses the need to take steps to support and ally with their liberation movements.

Black against empire: The history and politics of the Black Panther Party - Joshua Bloom

In Oakland, California, in 1966, community college students Bobby Seale and Huey Newton armed themselves, began patrolling the police, and promised to prevent police brutality.

No badjacketing: the state wants to kill us; let's not cooperate

Fred Hampton of the Black Panther Party, and Anna Mae Aquash of AIM.

An article by the Twin Cities General Defense Committee (GDC) of the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) about the dangers of 'badjacketing', which is defined as 'creating suspicion, by spreading rumors or unsubstantiated accusations, that people are undercovers, infiltrators, snitches, or cooperators. '

Young Patriots and Panthers: A story of white anti-racism

William 'Preacherman' Fesperman, Young Patriots leader.

A brief history of the collaboration between the Black Panthers and its white counterpart Young Patriot Organisation in Chicago.

Reflections on Jean Seberg and the Black Panther Party - Elaine Brown

Elaine Brown speaks

Fascinating extracts from the memoir of Elaine Brown, the only female leader in the Black Panther Party. Here she recalls Jean Seberg and other celebrities' involvement, the role of COINTELPRO, and the manoeuvrings of Eldridge Cleaver within the party.

The black radical tradition

A massive PDF compilation of writings about black radical and revolutionary movements in the US in the 20th century. This same reader is available in a cleaner format here: http://libcom.org/library/black-revolutionaries-us-communist-interventions-vol-3

Why I don't do Kwaanza - Bruce A Dixon

Chalk outlines of Bunchy Carter and John Huggins

Bruce A Dixon from Black Agenda Report explains why he doesn't celebrate Kwaanza: the holiday invented by Ron Karenga of the US Organization, which murdered leading members of the Black Panthers in the late 1960s.