capitalism

The road to barbarism - an interview with Robert Kurz - Anselmo Massad

A brief 2011 interview with Robert Kurz about the ongoing slide towards barbarism caused by the crisis of capitalism.

Robert Kurz interviewed by Sonia Montaño

In this 2006 interview, Robert Kurz offers a succinct definition the “radical critique of value”, and discusses the nature of the commodity and markets, the “ontologization of value”, abstract labor, the unsavory side of Enlightenment ideology, “the liberation of the abstract individual” as a result of the current global crisis, the “double Marx”, fetishism, Anselm Jappe’s book The Adventures of the Commodity, the continuing relevance of Guy Debord’s concept of the spectacle, and other topics, in an interview for a Brazilian online publication.

Robert Kurz's "journey to the heart of darkness" of capitalism - Anselm Jappe

Anselm Jappe discusses two of the last books published by Robert Kurz—The Lives and Death of Capitalism (2011) (a collection of articles and interviews from 2007-2010) and Money without Value (2012) (an “in-depth examination” of “value” and “money”)—in which Kurz reflects on the current crisis and seeks its causes, in accordance with his re-reading of the “esoteric” Marx and from the perspective of “value critique”, in the logic of capital.

Were we wrong? - Murray Bookchin

An essay in which Murray Bookchin argues against the dominant Marxist and anarchist view of capitalist development and revolutionary change. Published in Telos, Vol. 65, Fall, 1985, pp. 59-74.

A critique of Anselm Jappe's essay, "Who Is To Blame?" - Roland Simon (Excerpt)

In this 2009 article, Roland Simon of Théorie Communiste subjects Anselm Jappe and, more generally, the current known as “Value Critique”, to severe criticism, claiming that their emphasis on the “commodity” and “value” causes them to misunderstand the Marxist critique of capitalism and to harbor erroneous views about “a kind of value that is no longer value” because of an alleged decline of the proportion of labor in each commodity caused by increasing productivity, and that their “‘focus’ on value and the commodity causes us to ‘forget’ that value is capital” and that the goal of capitalism is not even just surplus-value but rather the reproduction of capitalist class relations.

The vivisection of oikeios: beyond the binary of nature and society

A felled tree

The common-sense distinction between nature and society was established through the bloody history of capitalist and colonial development, which brought about a real separation between the social and natural worlds.

What will we do if the system can no longer create jobs? An interview with Anselm Jappe – Alexandra Prado Coelho

A 2013 interview with Anselm Jappe in which he discusses the crisis of the society of labor, the logic of the commodity and exchange value and its disastrous consequences for an increasingly larger part of humanity, and perspectives for positive social change.

The historical cycle of the political rule of the bourgeoisie - Amadeo Bordiga

In this article first published in Prometeo in 1947, Amadeo Bordiga examines the history of the political forms of bourgeois rule and posits that it has passed through two stages (the early “heroic” period followed by the “golden age” of bourgeois democracy) and is now entering its third stage, characterized by the eclipse of “private initiative” and the rise of totalitarianism, as was demonstrated by the forces at work in World War Two, concerning which he says that “the fascists lost the war; fascism, however, was victorious”, because the victors are compelled to employ the “authoritarian and totalitarian methods that were first tested in the defeated countries”.

State capitalism in Russia - Murray Bookchin

Murray Bookchin

Murray Bookchin's critique of the USSR's economy as state capitalist. Published in Contemporary Issues 7, Autumn 1950 (under pseudonym M. S. Shiloh).

Teaching old dogs new tricks: Counter-theses and theses - Amadeo Bordiga

In this 1952 article from the “On the Thread of Time” series, on the eve of a split in the Internationalist Communist Party, Amadeo Bordiga sets forth his refutations (“theses”) of the innovators who stray from the correct doctrine of Marxism with their “dangerous improvisations” (“counter-theses”) in the fields of history, economics and philosophy—modestly claiming that his arguments might be rendered more “clear and convincing” if one were to devote “seven years” of “study and activity”, “seven hours a week”, to the task—with an ample selection of provocative epigrammatic comments on such topics as World Wars Two and Three, communism, bureaucracy, totalitarianism, ideology, etc.