Cornelius Castoriadis

The imaginary institution of society - Cornelius Castoriadis

Cornelius Castoriadis' far-reaching analysis of the unique character of the social-historical world and its relations to the individual, to language, and to nature. He argues that most traditional conceptions of society and history overlook the essential feature of the social-historical world, namely that this world is not articulated once and for all but is in each case the creation of the society concerned.

History & revolution: a revolutionary critique of historical materialism - Cornelius Castoriadis

History & revolution - Cornelius Castoriadis

Translation of a section from "Marxisme et Théorie Révolutionnaire" by Cornelius Castoriadis. Published as a pamphlet by Solidarity (London) in August 1971. Solidarity pamphlet no. 38.


Transcribers introduction :

Castoriadis' text was first published in five parts in the last five issues of 'Socialisme ou Barbarie' (SouB) (Nos 36-40). This section is from the first two parts in SouB 36 (April-June 1964) and 37 (July-September 1964). Solidarity translated other sections from "Marxisme et Théorie Révolutionnaire" which are in the library :

Solidarity for workers' power #8.07

Solidarity - vol 8 no 07

Final issue of Solidarity for Workers' Power dated 8 August, 1977. Articles about the Grunwick strike, Lucas Aerospace, 'Why I left the C.N.T.', 'Listen, Psychiatrist' by Cornelius Castoriadis (as Paul Cardan) and a review of Heilbroner's 'Business Civilization in Decline'.


TWO STRUGGLES

Two recent industrial struggles stand in stark contrast. One is the Grunwick strike, with its allied solidarity actions. The other is the initiative of the Lucas Aerospace shop stewards.

GRUNWICK : A 19th CENTURY DISPUTE

Redefining revolution - Cornelius Castoriadis

Redefining revolution

A translation of 'Recommencer la révolution' by Cornelius Castoriadis. It was published in early 1974 by Solidarity (London) as pamphlet No. 44.


Transcribers Introduction

Deviations, part 1: the Castoriadis-Pannekoek exchange

Asad Haider and Salar Mohandesi's introduction to a series of letters between Anton Pannekoek and Cornelius Castoriadis.

In early 1953 Cajo Bren­del, a Dutch coun­cil com­mu­nist affil­i­ated with a group known as Spar­ta­cus, vis­ited the mem­bers of Social­isme ou Bar­barie (Social­ism or Bar­barism) in Paris.

Maurice Brinton interview (1990)

Interview with Chris Pallis (aka Maurice Brinton) produced by Agora International during the Cerisy Colloquium. He talks about the importance of Cornelius Castoriadis’ (aka Paul Cardan)’s ideas in his break from Trotskyism, and the ‘Solidarity’ group, of which he was the most prominent member.

Source: Agora International

From bolshevism to the bureaucracy - Paul Cardan

From Bolshevism to the Bureaucracy

Essay written by Cornelius Castoriadis in 1963 as an introduction to the French translation of Kollontai's 'The Workers' Opposition'. Translated and published by Solidarity (London) in March 1967 (Solidarity pamphlet No. 24).


Introduction by Maurice Brinton

The crisis of modern society - Cornelius Castoriadis

The crisis of Modern Society

A talk given by 'Paul Cardan' (Cornelius Castoriadis). Issued as a pamphlet by Solidarity (London) a month later in June 1965. (Solidarity pamphlet No. 23).

Solidarity Preface

This pamphlet is based on a talk given by Paul Cardan at Tunbridge Wells, Kent, in May 1965.

History & revolution: Solidarity Discussion Bulletin 1 - Bob Potter and Maurice Brinton

History & revolution - Solidarity Discussion Bulletin 1

Bob Potter, a former member of Solidarity criticizes the Solidarity pamphlet 'History and Revolution' by 'Paul Cardan', and Cardan's treatment of Marx. Maurice Brinton responds.

This pamphlet was published by Solidarity (London) in early 1972, one of a couple of Discussion Bulletins they published at that time.


The meaning of socialism - Cornelius Castoriadis (Solidarity version)

The Meaning of Socialism

'The Meaning of Socialism' is a text by Cornelius Castoriadis (writing as 'Paul Cardan'). It was published in September 1961 by the UK group 'Socialism Reaffirmed' (which later renamed itself Solidarity) and became Solidarity pamphlet No.6.

'The Meaning of Socialism' was reprinted several times by Solidarity, often with changed or amended introductions. Included here are the first and the 1965, 1969 and 1972 versions.

Transcribers introduction: