economics

Towards a theory of the development of the world market and the world economy - Isaak Dashkovskij

The first of three articles. Under the Banner of Marxism, 1927, no.1 , 86-117. See part two and three.

How socialism can organise production without money - Adam Buick and Pieter Lawrence

A pair of interesting articles arguing the necessity of communism being a moneyless society, and outlining how parts of it could function.

Why we don't need money - Socialist Party of Great Britain

The SPGB respond to free market capitalist critics of socialism and explain how money is unnecessary.

The political economy of the West Bank 1967-1987: from peripheralisation to development - Adel Samara

An Israeli soldier watches Palestinians flee to Jordan from the West Bank, 1967.

Discussion on the general features of the political economy of the West Bank from 1967 to 1987 and how the Israeli state has both destroyed and transformed it.

Farewell to the middle classes - Matt Cole

When the middle drops to the bottom, the bottom drops out.

The development of capitalism in Egypt - Patrick Clawson

Anwar El Sadat, Egyptian President 1970-1981.

Major work by Patrick Clawson on the structure of Egyptian capitalism and the changes it has undergone throughout its history, arguing that these changes can be understood only as part of developments in international capitalism and the demands of advanced capitalist countries.

What is property? - Pierre-Joseph Proudhon

Pierre-Joseph Proudhon

Pierre-Joseph Proudhon's What is Property? has become a classic of political thought through its wide-ranging and deep-reaching critique of private property as at once the essential institution of Western culture and the root cause of greed, corruption, political tyranny, social division, and violation of natural law.

The general idea of the revolution in the nineteenth century - Pierre-Joseph Proudhon

Pierre-Joseph Proudhon

The General Idea of the Revolution in the Nineteenth Century is one of the classics of anarchist literature. Written in the aftermath of the 1848 French Revolution, it sets forth a libertarian alternative to the Jacobinism which at that time still dominated the republican and revolutionary movements in France.

Dispatches for the New York Tribune: selected journalism of Karl Marx

Karl Marx is arguably the most famous political philosopher of all time, but he was also one of the great foreign correspondents of the nineteenth century. Drawing on his eleven-year tenure at the New York Tribune (which began in 1852), this completely new collection presents Marx's writings on an abundance of topics, from issues of class and state to world affairs. Particularly moving pieces highlight social inequality and starvation in Britain, while others explore his groundbreaking views on the slave and opium trades. Throughout, Marx's fresh perspective on nineteenth-century events reveals a social consciousness that remains inspiring to this day.