environment

Après moi le déluge! Fossil fuel abolitionism and the carbon bubble - part 1

Image: carbontracker.org

In part one of this two-part article, we look at the so-called ‘carbon bubble’ – assets priced based on 'unburnable' fossil fuels.

The 'carbon bubble' and path dependency

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and its latest report

The latest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report came out on Monday. This post includes some background on the IPCC, and discussion of the report.

The IPCC - background and history

Man and nature - Elisée Reclus

The present pamphlet contains two essays concerning the relationship between man and nature by the anarchist geographer Elisée Reclus. the first is a review of the book, Man and Nature, by George Perkins Marsh. In the second essay, Reclus concerns himself with the the awareness of nature in modern society.

The final solution - Renaud Miailhe

An essay on biotechnology, its ideological precursors and its disastrous implications, with discussions of eugenics, futurism, fantasies of space colonization, genetic intervention to mitigate the harmful effects of unbridled technological and industrial development, genetic screening, the Human Genome Project, and the “proletarianization of life”.

The Final Solution – Renaud Miailhe

“My generation, or perhaps the one preceding mine, has been the first to engage, under the leadership of the exact sciences, in a destructive colonial warfare against nature. The future will curse us for it.”
(Declaration of Erwin Chargaff, pioneer of molecular biology, 1976)

Antarctica - Kim Stanley Robinson

Antarctica is Robinson's first novel published after the success of the Mars trilogy. However, because of the similarity in the themes of both works, Antarctica has been called "White Mars" by some. Antarctica describes the small Antarctic society and their struggle to keep Antarctica safe from the potential exploitation of its fossil fuel resources.

What's wrong with Prometheanism?

Prometheus: mythical figure who stole fire from the gods

Simple questions of technological progress abound in metaphysical subtleties and theological niceties.

In response to our introduction to Murray Bookchin's philosophy of technology, a commenter asked:

888 wrote:
What's so bad about Prometheanism? Sounds good to me! Defying the gods, playing with fire, storming heaven...

Killer coal-burning plant switched off in Vado Ligure, Italy

A coal burning factory in northern Italy, which caused pollution linked to the deaths of hundreds of local residents and was owned by entrepreneurs close to the centre-left political party, has been closed down by police.

The Tirreno Power coal-burning power station in Vado Ligure, near Savona, has been shut down by police at the request of the Public Prosecutor. This comes as a result of a three-year investigation by the Public Prosecutor into the plant’s effects on the environment and public health.

Murray Bookchin's libertarian technics

A robot adjusting solar panels

The first in a series of critical introductions to thinkers and concepts that inform discussion of the climate crisis, looking at Murray Bookchin's ideas about technology.

Murray Bookchin (1921-2006) was a pioneer of radical ecological thought and working class autodidact. Bookchin's political trajectory took him from Stalinism (as a 9 year-old, he was soon expelled), to Trotskyism, to anarchism, to eventually breaking with anarchism and founding libertarian municipalism/communalism in an attempt to engage with the local state.

Let them eat growth

Image source: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nclimate2148

Radicals are right to point out capitalism's need for growth at all costs is the road to ruin, but does runaway climate change wreck the prospect of a communist society too?

A tale of two charts

After the collapse: notes on the technological utopia (excerpts) - Jean-Marc Mandosio

Chapter 3 and portions of Chapter 4 from Jean-Marc Mandosio’s book, Après l'effondrement: notes sur l'utopie néotechnologique (Éditions de l'Encyclopédie des Nuisances, 2000), in which the author discusses the disastrous effects of what he calls “neotechnology” on the human species and how these disasters are imposed as wonderful innovations in all domains, from music and books to genetic engineering, resulting in a “four-fold collapse” affecting the human perception of time and space, the ability to think, and “the very idea of humanity itself”.