environment

Murray Bookchin's libertarian technics

A robot adjusting solar panels

The first in a series of critical introductions to thinkers and concepts that inform discussion of the climate crisis, looking at Murray Bookchin's ideas about technology.

Let them eat growth

Image source: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nclimate2148

Radicals are right to point out capitalism's need for growth at all costs is the road to ruin, but does runaway climate change wreck the prospect of a communist society too?

After the collapse: notes on the technological utopia (excerpts) - Jean-Marc Mandosio

Chapter 3 and portions of Chapter 4 from Jean-Marc Mandosio’s book, Après l'effondrement: notes sur l'utopie néotechnologique (Éditions de l'Encyclopédie des Nuisances, 2000), in which the author discusses the disastrous effects of what he calls “neotechnology” on the human species and how these disasters are imposed as wonderful innovations in all domains, from music and books to genetic engineering, resulting in a “four-fold collapse” affecting the human perception of time and space, the ability to think, and “the very idea of humanity itself”.

Protecting public health on the Italian Riviera: the Maersk case

Liguria, with its beautiful coastline and wonderful mountainous hinterland, has been a place for people from Northern Europe and the north of Italy to take holidays since the 19th century. After the Second World War the region saw a boom in tourism and in industrial development with all the attendant consequences: illegal building activity, destruction of the environment, very large numbers of migrants and urbanisation of the rural population.

Goodbye to the future

Goodbye to the future

An environmentalism that appeals to the future will come too late.

Communising energy: power to the people!

A brief critique of the existing model of heat production in Britain and a comparison with a communal system. If you thought things were rosy in the garden, think again...

Who's afraid of ruins?

New Orleans under water - wikicommons

Capitalism is locking-in climate change for centuries, but in the process, making radical social change more realistic than tinkering around the edges.

Out of the Woods - a new blog on climate change

Sea ice breaking up

Announcing a new collaborative blog project to investigate capitalism and climate change.

Redefining green anarchism: that dreaded "I" word - Steve Ongerth

Neither we IWWs, nor green syndicalists, for that matter, are arguing for "One Big Factory" in any case. What we are saying is that we recognize that in order to abolish the worst aspects of "industrialism", (capitalism), at least part of the strategy must involve seizing the machinery of production.

It's what happens after that which is the bone of contention. We argue that at least some industry is necessary for people to live and prosper.

Selections from Perspectivas Antidesarrollistas – Miguel Amorós

Six short texts from a book published in 2012 (Anti-developmentalist Perspectives) largely based on talks given in 2009-2010 on the topic of the need for a transition from the economically, environmentally and spiritually unviable city-centered system of globalized capitalism to a new territorial dispersal of human society and productive activities, attaining a higher synthesis of the restoration of the liberating aspects of the city (freedom, public space) and the traditional virtues of the “territory” (local production, self-sufficiency) that can only be brought about by an anti-capitalist revolution.