Germany

Televisionaries: the Red Army Faction story - Tom Vague

RAF attack on a US military base, 1981

A short book on Germany's most notorious urban guerrilla group, the Red Army Faction, aka the Baader-Meinhof gang. While very uncritical of the group's authoritarian politics and attacks which harm civilians, it contains useful information and so is reproduced here for reference only.

The Christmas truce, 1914 - Steven Johns

British and German troops fraternise, Boxing Day 1914

A short history of the widespread but unofficial truce between British and German troops on the Western front over Christmas, 1914 during World War I.

The responsibility of intellectuals - Dwight Macdonald

Max Lerner

In the April 1945 edition of politics, Dwight Macdonald took aim at the collective-guilt mentality as embodied in one of his favorite targets among liberal intellectuals, Max Lerner. The article also affords a prime sample of Macdonald's wry, satiric writing style.

Anarchism in Germany and other essays - Gustav Landauer

Five essays, together with a historical/biographical sketch of the legendary German anarchist. Expelled (along with Malatesta, et al.) from the Second International, he was a theorist and activist second to none—brutally murdered by the Social Democrats while leading the Bavarian Commune in 1919.

Prophet of community: the romantic socialism of Gustav Landauer - Eugene Lunn

Eugene Lunn's in-depth study of Gustav Landauer's life and thought.

Critique’s quarrel with church and state (excerpt) - Edgar Bauer

Sketch of Edgar Bauer

The young Edgar Bauer (1820-1886) was credited by Gustav Landauer and Max Nettlau with founding the anarchist tradition in Germany. The following is a selection from his 'Der Streit der Kritik mit Kirche und Staat' (1843), pp. 260-269. After the failed 1848 revolutions Bauer renounced radicalism and embraced conservatism.

The reaction in Germany - Mikhail Bakunin

'Die Reaktion in Deutschland. Ein Fragment von einem Franzosen’ first appeared in Arnold Ruge (ed.), Deutsche Jahrbücher fur Wissenschaft and Kunst, nos. 247-51 (Leipzig, October 17th-21st, 1842) under the pseudonym "Jules Elysard". Die Reaktion was written in response to Ruge's call set forth in the Preface to the first edition of Deutsche Jahrbücher for all Hegelians to enter into political struggle.

How did the first world war actually end? - Paul Mason

Mutinous sailors, Kiel, 1918

Journalist Paul Mason poses the question of how World War I actually ended, as this question is being roundly ignored amidst the often revisionist and pro-war centenary commemorations.