Germany

How did the first world war actually end? - Paul Mason

Mutinous sailors, Kiel, 1918

Journalist Paul Mason poses the question of how World War I actually ended, as this question is being roundly ignored amidst the often revisionist and pro-war centenary commemorations.

How it all began: the personal account of a West German urban guerrilla - Bommi Baumann

A memoir of Bommi Baumann, a member of the 2 June Movement, one of West Germany's urban guerrilla groups in the 1960s and 70s. First published in 1975, after he renounced violence and left the group in 1972. Libcom.org does not agree with all the politics of the author but reproduces this text for reference.

A German deserter's war experiences

Book written by an anonymous German soldier who deserted during World War I about his experiences, first published in 1917.

Idee und Organisation im Lichte konstruktiver Planung des Sozialismus

Eine Debatte in der IWA-AIT über post-kapitalistischen Gesellschaft, Arbeiterräte, und die Struktur der revolutionären unionen.

Reviews: great but unrealized possibilities in Germany

A review by Steve Kellerman of Martin Comack's Wild Socialism: Workers Councils in Revolutionary Berlin, 1918-21.

The strike at Neupack and the question of strike solidarity

Translation of article from wildcat collective on strike at packaging manufacturer in Germany in 2013 and the question of strike support.

Max Stirner: his life and his work - John Henry Mackay

Max Stirner

Max Stiner (1806-1856) was the philosopher of conscious egoism. His book Der Einzige und sein Eigenthum (1844; published in English as The Ego and His Own, 1907) is the fundamental work of that philosophy and the philosophical basis of individualist anarchism. The German poet and anarchist writer John Henry Mackay carefully researched Stimer's life and published his biography in 1 897, with a third, definitive edition in 1914. This is the first translation into English.

Are these the ideas of a heretic? - Gustav Landauer

Gustav Landauer

Like many other Jewish intellectuals of his day who sought to identify themselves as Jews, Landauer was estranged from the Jewish religion and communal institutions on the one hand, and yet was not satisfied with merely ethnic identification on the other. He was inspired by Martin Buber and his concept of a primal Jewish religiosity or spiritual sensibility that is independent of doctrine and ritual prescriptions.

Rosa Luxemburg: a true revolutionary

An article by Staughton Lynd about the socialist revolutionary, Rosa Luxemburg.

Schreiber, Otto, 1868-1917: victim of the war “for liberty and democracy”

Letter from Schreiber to Landauer

A short biography of German anarchist Otto Schreiber, who was active in London for many years.