Germany

Prophet of community: the romantic socialism of Gustav Landauer - Eugene Lunn

Eugene Lunn's in-depth study of Gustav Landauer's life and thought.

On Stirner and Szeliga - Edgar Bauer

Editor's Note: When John H. Mackay prepared his book on Stirner, he wrote a number of letters to former members of that intellectual encounter-group, "The Free [die Freien]." Mackay's friend, Max Hildebrandt, sent him the following letter from Edgar Bauer, which was not published, but which he nevertheless employed in his book for characterizing Stirner, and it gives a vivid portrait of two of the most active members of the group: Stirner and Szeliga. They, like Dr. Oswald [Engels], took up noms de guerre in their world-historical struggle of the Free.

An excerpt from 'critique’s quarrel with church and state' - Edgar Bauer

Edgar Bauer

The young Edgar Bauer (1820-1886) was credited by Gustav Landauer and Max Nettlau for founding the anarchist tradition in Germany. The following is a selection from his 'Der Streit der Kritik mit Kirche und Staat' (1843), pp. 260-269. After the failed 1848 revolutions Bauer renounced radicalism and his former left-Hegelianism, became an informant for the Danish police, and ultimately founded his own conservative journal, Kirchliche Blätter.

The reaction in Germany - Mikhail Bakunin

'Die Reaktion in Deutschland. Ein Fragment von einem Franzosen’ first appeared in Arnold Ruge (ed.), Deutsche Jahrbücher fur Wissenschaft and Kunst, nos. 247-51 (Leipzig, October 17th-21st, 1842) under the pseudonym "Jules Elysard". Die Reaktion was written in response to Ruge's call set forth in the Preface to the first edition of Deutsche Jahrbücher for all Hegelians to enter into political struggle.

How did the first world war actually end? - Paul Mason

Mutinous sailors, Kiel, 1918

Journalist Paul Mason poses the question of how World War I actually ended, as this question is being roundly ignored amidst the often revisionist and pro-war centenary commemorations.

How it all began: the personal account of a West German urban guerrilla - Bommi Baumann

A memoir of Bommi Baumann, a member of the 2 June Movement, one of West Germany's urban guerrilla groups in the 1960s and 70s. First published in 1975, after he renounced violence and left the group in 1972. Libcom.org does not agree with all the politics of the author but reproduces this text for reference.

A German deserter's war experiences

Book written by an anonymous German soldier who deserted during World War I about his experiences, first published in 1917.

Idee und Organisation im Lichte konstruktiver Planung des Sozialismus

Eine Debatte in der IWA-AIT über post-kapitalistischen Gesellschaft, Arbeiterräte, und die Struktur der revolutionären unionen.

Reviews: great but unrealized possibilities in Germany

A review by Steve Kellerman of Martin Comack's Wild Socialism: Workers Councils in Revolutionary Berlin, 1918-21.

The strike at Neupack and the question of strike solidarity

Translation of article from wildcat collective on strike at packaging manufacturer in Germany in 2013 and the question of strike support.