globalisation

The show must go on: a modest attempt to explain a world that has gone mad - Argelaga

An editorial published in November 2016 on the website of the journal, Argelaga, on the state of the “spectacle” after Trump’s election, claiming, among other things, that although recent trends indicate that “the spectacle of decomposition is not the decomposition of the spectacle”, in part because “the masses … only want to follow the person who assures them that their addiction to abundant consumption and security can continue”, “the end of the industrial cycle that began after the Second World War” nevertheless entails “constant outbreaks of resistance [that] indicate that, without too much memory and, therefore, with little lucidity, the struggle for emancipation continues”.

Trump and trade war - Mouvement Communiste/Kolektivně proti Kapitălu

Trump painting

A brief text discussing the likely impact of Trump's economic policies (in so far as he has coherent policies) and the social and economic forces behind them.

Super imperialism: the origins and fundamentals of U.S. world dominance - Michael Hudson

Michael Hudson's in-depth and highly controversial study of imperialism, lauded by (among others) Loren Goldner.

So this is how it ends: Obama spends his last months in office shilling for the TPP

Obama pushing the TPP on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon

The “hope and change” candidate will go out with a whimper. After nearly eight years of consistent support for neoliberalism, Obama will spend the freest months of his presidency shilling for the likes of Pfizer and Comcast.

The golden mediocrity - Miguel Amorós

Considerations on the political situation in Spain in 2015, with a brief historical survey of the origins of the civil society movement in the aftermath of the defeat of the workers movement in the eighties, the rise of postmodernism, the impact of the economic crisis, the sources of middle class discontent that gave rise to the civil society movement during the nineties, the new social democratic nostalgia and renascent regional nationalism, and the need to break out of the constraints imposed by the civil society movement in order to really fight for “an egalitarian social transformation of society”.

Paranoia and terror as models of governance – Alèssi Dell’Umbria

A 2011 essay on Mexico’s descent into chaos under the blows of NAFTA and the “drug war”, whose purpose is not only to transform northern Mexico into a security zone for the U.S., but also to hasten “primitive accumulation” (driving peasants off their land—which is then handed over to agribusiness or extraction industries—and into the “colonias” where they will be prey to the drug war and intensive police and military repression) by destroying the surviving communal social forms in “a war against society” that is traumatizing the population but also generating a largely indigenous, assembly-based autonomous movement that is forming militias to defend its communities (e.g., Chiapas).

Aléssi dell’Umbria’s Istmeño—The Winds of Revolt: a documentary film about resistance against dispossession – Argelaga

A review of the 2015 documentary film about the resistance struggle against the construction of gigantic arrays of industrial wind turbines to generate “clean” energy in Oaxaca (southern Mexico), discussing the resistance movement’s historical background in Mexico’s precipitous descent into the nightmare of the accelerated expropriation of the agrarian population by the economic impact of NAFTA since 1994 and the “police-military narco-state violence” that has been used as a convenient screen for repression and elimination of dissidents, as the country is integrated into the world market and its resources are further opened to foreign exploitation.

The Ideology of Progress in Latin America – Revista Argelaga

An essay “written on the occasion of the premier of the documentary film, ‘Asfaltar Bolivia’” [Paving Bolivia] in Barcelona (2015), denouncing the destructive impact of capitalist development and its hypocritical rhetoric of “progress”, “development” and “modernization”, in the context of the recent nationalist upsurge based on extractive industries and a modified form of globalization that has swept over Latin America as the new populist leaders attempt to impose “modern, consumerist, individualist and predatory lifestyles” to create a “social base” so the “extractivist bureaucracy can consolidate its power” at the expense of indigenous communities and “collective ways of life”.