groups

A history of the 62 Group

A member of the 62 group is arrested in Victoria Park, London, 1962

A special feature on the 1962 Committee, more commonly known as the 62 Group, a militant, Jewish-led anti-fascist organisation formed in London. Containing detailed personal accounts and extensive information on the far right at the time.

The Red Butterfly - John Lauritsen

John Lauritsen in 1969

A first person account of involvement in and the activity of The Red Butterfly, a socialist "cell" within the US Gay Liberation Front 1969-1971.

Manifesto - Gay Liberation Front

GLF members in Sussex on Remembrance Day, 1973

The manifesto of the UK organisation the Gay Liberation Front, written in 1971 in London and revised in 1978.

The Provos: Amsterdam's anarchist revolt - Richard Kempton

A book written by Richard Kempton on the 1960s Dutch Provo movement.

Solidarity and me - Paul Anderson

A personal account of involvement in the libertarian socialist group Solidarity and the Oxford Anarchist Group.

Workers' Power League: a presentation

From Förbundet Arbetarmakt (FAM), in English, "Workers' Power League". The League, with its predecessors and aftermath, were active during the years 1972 - 1985. This text was written about 1975, as a presentation of the League in English.

Prairie Struggle is dead and the struggle continues

A retrospective of Prairie Struggle, an anarchist political organization from Canada that existed from 2011-2015.

Black Mask and Up Against the Wall Motherfucker: flower power won't stop fascist power

Black Mask pamphlet cover

Subtitled "the story of a small, underground 1960s revolutionary group in New York City", this is a short pamphlet about the group, which has been described as a "situationist street gang".

A tough period for the SAC

A 2002 article from Arbetaren, the publication of the Swedish syndicalist union, SAC about the contemporary state of the organisation and the challenges it faced.

The Pop Up Union: a postmortem

Pop-up union members take part in national demo

When management at the University of Sussex announced plans to outsource 235 jobs, workers responded by launching a 'Pop-Up Union', a new tactic in modern British industrial relations. Is this a model other workers can emulate?