Ken Weller

What happened at Fords - Ken Weller and Ernie Stanton

Solidarity pamphlet 26 containing three articles about the defeat of the workers in a dispute at the Ford Dagenham plant in 1962, and what workers can learn from it.

Truth about Vauxhall - Ken Weller

1967 reprint of Solidarity pamphlet 12 from 1962 about the situation at Vauxhall Motors in the UK. In particular it looks at how management had temporarily bought/enforced industrial peace and had suggestions on how workers could begin to fight for their interests.

A short history of the police strikes of 1918-1919 - Ken Weller

Jack Hayes, police union secretary, addresses strike rally on Tower Hill, 1918

Ken Weller of Solidarity's brief history of the two strikes of London police officers during and after World War I. Libcom does not support strikes of police officers as such but reproduce this text as an important bit of the mass upheavals of the time.

The London transport women workers' strike, 1918 - Ken Weller

Bus workers on strike, 1918

A short history of the partially successful wildcat strike of women workers in London's public transport network during World War I for a war bonus payment and equal pay with men.

'Don't be a soldier!' The radical anti-war movement in north London 1914-1918 - Ken Weller

Antiwar demonstration in Trafalgar Square, 1914

Ken Weller of Solidarity's excellent and detailed historical account of working class opposition to World War I in North London, which offers a snapshot of the anti-war movement nationally.

The north London IWW in the 1st World War - Ken Weller

IWW pyramid of class relations

A chapter from Weller's excellent Don't be a Soldier! - the radical anti-war movement in north London 1914-1918. This was the only period in which the Wobblies had any significant presence among the UK radical workers' movement.

The Lordstown struggle and the real crisis in production - Ken Weller

Fascinating pamphlet by Solidarity on the informal workers struggle against the frenetic pace of work at a General Motors plant, and the later co-optation of the struggle by the auto workers union.