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Mark Leier

“We must do away with racial prejudice and imaginary boundary lines”: British Columbia wobblies before the First World War – Mark Leier

Labour historian Mark Leier’s chapter from Wobblies of the World: A Global History of the IWW, in which he examines the transnationalism of the IWW, particularly across the US-Canadian border.

Divide and conquer or divide and subdivide? How not to refight the First International – Mark Leier

A pamphlet by labour historian Mark Leier (author of Bakunin: The Creative Passion) which looks at the similarities and differences of the two leading figures of the First International, Mikhail Bakunin and Karl Marx. Leier suggests that the differences are often exaggerated by anarchists and Marxists alike, and that revolutionaries today can learn a great deal from both figures' strengths and weaknesses.

Monopoly capitalism and the rise of syndicalism – Mark Leier

A portion of the first chapter of labour historian Mark Leier’s 1990 book Where the Fraser River Flows: The Industrial Workers of the World in British Columbia, which may serve as an introduction to the IWW’s syndicalist ideas and practices, as well as what conditions brought about the revolutionary union in the first place.

(Note: Besides the final paragraph, ~3,200 of the last words were left out for the sake of being concise. What was left out went further in depth about how "the essence of the new system of production was [...] in increasing the division of labour and in reducing the initiative of the workers over the work process," showing how some tried to achieve this.)

To praise Ginger Goodwin is to revere a radical – Mark Leier

Ginger Goodwin

Feisty miner reminds that comfortable compromisers are easily forgotten.

In this piece (originally published by The Tyee in 2014), Mark Leier, author of Bakunin: The Creative Passion, emphasises the radical edge of Ginger Goodwin – the English migrant coal miner turned labour organiser who is recognised as a martyr by many workers in British Columbia, Canada – by comparing him to one of his contemporaries.