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Mexico

Hijos de Campesinos: Teachers' Struggles in Chiapas - Monty Neill and Peter Linebaugh

Photo by Sharon Haggins Dunn

Monty Neill and Peter Linebaugh of Midnight Notes interviewed Susan Street about the struggles of teachers, campesinos, ejidatarios and urban dwellers (colonos) in the Mexican state of Chiapas. Susan, who has been living in Mexico since 1977, has become active in supporting these struggles. Guillermo Orozco, a Mexican national and resident of Mexico City, but not active in Chiapas, also participated. The first interview took place in Boston on October 27, 1986. A second interview, also in Boston, was done exactly one year later, October 27, 1987, and further discussions occurred in ensuing months. "Hijos de Campesinos" means 'children of the campesinos.'

The Uses of an Earthquake - Harry Cleaver

Midnight Notes on the disaster communism and refual of work in the Mexican community of Tepito.

Las Costureras - Monty Neill and Johnny Machete

Midnight Notes' coverage of women workers organising an independent union after their co-workers were killed in an earthquake.

Of Indiscriminate Attacks and Wild Reactions: An Anti-Civ Anarchist Engages with ITS and Atassa, their Defenders and Their false Critics

A critique of the "eco-extremist" trend and its defenders and publicists among the nihilist and post-left anarchist milieu. While many libertarian communists have significant differences with the author's politics, it is reproduced here as an important expose of how far some anarchists were willing to embrace a completely reactionary form of misanthropic and misogynistic politics. Taken from the archive at Anarchist Libraries.
Content note: this piece includes discussion of sexual violence.

When the poor police themselves: Public insecurity and extralegal criminal-justice administration in Mexico

Jennifer Johnson's chapter examining a collective self-help policing and penal justice initiative that emerged in contemporary rural Mexico.

Interview on the strike wave in Mexico

SITUAM workers march in Mexico City, 2019 | Image courtesy Patrick Cuninghame

Ray Valentine interviews Patrick Cuninghame, a History and Sociology lecturer at the Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana (UAM) in Mexico City, about the strike wave in Mexico this year. The strikes started in Matamoros, among workers in maquiladoras (assembly plants), and later spread to seven universities, including UAM. This interview was first published on the Organizing Work blog.

Amazon: A new business model better able to manage the contradictions of the capitalist mode of production

Amazon cardboard robot

An attempt to understand the functioning of one the world's most powerful companies using marxist categories - explaining how Amazon manages to combine the functions of productive, comercial and finance capital. The intention is, of course, to try to work out the implications for class strugle...

New trade union bureaucracies or rank-and-file workers’ power? Lessons of the Matamoros workers’ rebellion: Part one

Striking workers in matamoros

Two months after workers launched wildcat strikes in the Mexican city of Matamoros, 89 “maquiladora” factories, mostly in the auto parts, electric, and metallurgical industries, have agreed to workers’ demands for a 20 percent raise and a bonus of 32,000 pesos (US$1,655)—half of the average yearly salary. The strike wave has become known across Mexico as the “20/32 movement.”

Mexico: Metalworkers, universities join strike wave as 90,000 Walmart workers threaten to walk out

Dozens of maquiladora plants that agreed to the “20-32”—a 20 percent raise and a bonus of 32,000 pesos (US$1,700)—demanded by workers in Matamoros, Mexico, are escalating their reprisals against the historic wave of strikes that began in the city on January 12. This has included thousands of firings.