Mustapha Khayati

Anatomy of a scandal – Miguel Amorós

An account of the “Strasbourg Scandal” of 1966—widely recognized as a precursor to the greater scandal of May 1968—its background, its protagonists, the takeover of the local student union and the origins of the pamphlet, “The Poverty of Student Life…”, the role played by the members of the Situationist International in the affair, particularly Debord and Mustapha Khayati, the humiliating exclusion of the “Garnaultins” in January 1967, and the SI’s subsequent descent into an even more rigid and unapproachable sectarian existence until its dissolution in 1972.

Class Struggles in Algeria

Mustapha Khayati with Alice Becker-Ho 1966

Published clandestinely in Algeria as a pamphlet, December 1965; trans. by Ken Knabb

The Algeria of Daniel Guérin, Libertarian

Mustapha Khayati responds to Daniel Guerin's writing on Algeria.

Address to Revolutionaries of Algeria and of All Countries

Houari Boumedienne (1966) by Erling Mandelmann

"Proletarian revolutions . . . pitilessly scoff at the hesitations, weaknesses and inadequacies of their first efforts, seem to throw down their adversary only to see him draw new strength from the earth and rise again formidably before them, recoil again and again before the immensity of their tasks, until a situation is finally created that goes beyond the point of no return."

--Marx, The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte

Two Local Wars

The Arab-Israel war was a dirty trick pulled by modern history on the good conscience of the Left, which was communing in the great spectacle of its protest against the Vietnam war. The false consciousness that saw in the NLF the champion of "socialist revolution" against American imperialism could only get entangled and collapse amidst its insurmountable contradictions when it had to decide between Israel and Nasser. Yet throughout all its ludicrous polemics it never stopped proclaiming that one side or the other was completely in the right, or even that one or another of their perspectives was revolutionary.