mutinies

GI resistance to the Vietnam War photo gallery

From the archives at Sir ! No Sir!, photos of various episodes of rank-and-file soldiers' resistance to the Vietnam War

Why Blackadder Goes Forth could have been a lot funnier

A fascinating look at Tommy Atkins' hidden tactics to avoid combat on the western front in World War I, or why ‘Blackadder Goes Forth’ could have been a lot funnier (and more subversive)…

A young Army, but the finest we have ever marshalled; improvised at the sound of the cannonade, every man a volunteer, inspired not only by love of country but by a widespread conviction that human freedom was challenged by military and Imperial tyranny, they grudged no sacrifice however unfruitful and shrank from no ordeal however destructive...

Under the banner of King Death - Marcus Rediker

Essay on the last years of the golden age of piracy. This was the basis for Rediker's full length Villains of all Nations.

The British West Indies Regiment mutiny, 1918 - Steven Johns

A short history of the mutiny at Taranto in Italy by West Indian soldiers in the British army at the end of World War I, which had a significant impact subsequently on anti-colonial struggles in the Caribbean.

Introduction

With the outbreak of the First World War in 1914, thousands of West Indians volunteered to join the British army. They were encouraged to do so by activists like Marcus Garvey, on the basis that if they showed their loyalty to the King they would show they have the right to be treated as equals.

A short history of the Boston police strike, 1919

A short history of the unsuccessful strike of Boston police officers in 1919. libcom.org does not support strikes of police officers but we host this article for reference.

In Boston in 1919, police officers worked 83-98 hour weeks and were paid $.21-$.25 per hour. Amidst a nationwide strike wave, the local policemen's organization, known as the Boston Social Club, decided to affiliate with the American Federation of Labour (AFL) when nineteen of their leaders were fired by the Police Commissioner, the club members voted 1,134-2 to strike.

The Belfast police mutiny of 1907 - John Gray

A history of the mutiny of 70% of the Belfast police force during a dockers' strike which brought together Catholic and Protestant workers in struggle.

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

GI revolts: The breakdown of the US army in Vietnam - Richard Boyle

Two stories of revolts by US troops, including the shooting of a top sergeant and the mutiny of Bravo Company at Firebase Pace near Cambodia, written by Richard Boyle, a war correspondent who spent three tours in Vietnam.

The Vietnam War was one of the least popular in American history. It was also the least “popular” with the GI’s who were sent to fight it. By the late 1960’s, news of GI unrest was being carried on TV and in newspapers around the country and Vietnam vets were speaking at anti-war demonstrations.

The quiet mutiny (documentary)

John Pilger’s controversial first documentary film created a sensation when it broke the story of a rebellion emerging within the American army fighting the War in Vietnam. Changing public and media perception of the war, The Quiet Mutiny contributed to the withdrawal of US troops from the region.

In this, the first of his 58 documentary films, John Pilger combines candid interviews and amazing frontline footage of Vietnam to portray a growing rift between the US military bureaucrats - "lifers" - and the soldiers who physically and mentally fight the war on the ground, the "grunts". By 1970, it is an internal sense of disillusionment and frustration born from this rift that is triggering the withdrawal of US forces from Vietnam.

As the US employs psychological warfare against its enemy, Pilger finds himself unable to glean significant information from the military; a press conference he attends is nicknamed "the 5 o'clock follies" for the evasive nature of the proceedings. And so it is with the grunts, the "wheels of the green machine", that Pilger finds a very human side to the US presence in Vietnam: soldiers who are at once ready to serve their country and doubtful of their purpose there. Plied with visits from Miss America and ignored by Vice President Spiro Agnew, they experience the war in a way many of their superiors do not.

Review via - http://www.bullfrogfilms.com/catalog/quiet.html

The many-headed hydra - Peter Linebaugh and Marcus Rediker

Sailors, slaves, commoners, and the hidden history of the revolutionary Atlantic.

Winner of the International Labor History Award

The Black Sea Mutiny: the Marty Myth and the Role of the Anarchists

Marty

A look at the French Communist Party's mystification of the 1919 Black Sea Mutiny.

We, the Social Defence Committee and the Black Sea Sailors Committee, have transformed this wind bag (André Marty) into a hero”. (End of report of talk by Louis Sellier to the municipal councillors of Paris 11 December 1931).