No Tav Luca Abbà severely injured while resisting to an expropriation

Luca Abbà NoTav

No Tav activists were not expecting the police to expropriate until the following night, but they came in the morning, after an urgent order by the Prefect. On Monday 27th February they started to build the fences to enlarge the construction site, in spite of the 75.000 people demonstration that took place just two days before.

75,000 say no, but government goes straight on

Susa march

Update (27 february 2012, 11:00 am italian time):
While we write, police forces are expanding the off-limit area, trying to clear the baita in order to demolish it. Fifteen protesters are resisting in it. One notav protester, chased by police, climbed on an electric pylon, and then fell down (from 10 meters high) after taking a shock. He’s now under surgery in Turin, ambulance transportation has been delayed by police for almost an hour. Roadblocks and rails occupations by notav protesters have started in Valsusa and solidarity actions are being planned in all Italy. More updates later on.
(type #forzaluca on Twitter).

Solidarity with the NOTAV arrestees: updates

Milan "Can't arrest struggles. Freedom for every NoTav struggler"

An update from Italy Calling on solidarity with arrested participants in the no-TAV anti-high-speed rail protests.

No-Tav demonstration in Torino

March in via Roma

The “no-tav” movement demonstrates in Turin against that judiciary action with a march of about 10 thousand people.

Police repression against No-TAV movement

March against repression

25 activists from all over the country were arrested in the repressive turn against NOTAV , while 15 more people were subject to precautionary measures and one french activist recived a prohibition of residence in Torino’s province, which includes the Susa Valley. Only three of the arrested people are originally from the Susa Valley: Giorgio Rossetto, leader of the Turin-based squatted community Askatasuna and Guido Fissore, 66, member of town council of Villarfochiardo, and Mario Nucera, barber in Bussoleno.

Servirail and Ferrotel workers in protest

Ferrotel workers (via tempostretto.it)

Workers on transport sector form the South of Italy are fighting back against new industrial plan of Ferrovie dello Stato (the national railway service).

Trouble on the Railroads in 1873-1874: Prelude to the 1877 Crisis?

Between November 1873 and July 1874, workers on the Pennsylvania system and at least 17 other railroads struck. Engineers, firemen, brakemen, and track hands as well as shopmen and ordinary laborers resisted wage cuts, demanded salary due them, and opposed such employer practices as blacklisting and the use of iron-clad contracts. None of these disputes was so dramatic or important as the general railroad strike in 1877, but together they prophetically etched the outlines of that violent outburst.

Appeal to join the solidarity caravan to Longview, Washington

For the full, original article, feel free to visit the Trial by Fire.

Appeal to Join the Solidarity Caravan to Longview, Washington
ILWU rank and file, Occupies in Longview, Portland, Seattle, Oakland, LA and other West Coast Occupies are organizing to blockade a grain ship coming to Longview. This ship is intended to load scab cargo from the EGT terminal. The date won’t be known until 3-4 days in advance, but is anticipated to be sometime in January.

Class conflict and workers' self activity on the railroads: 1874-1895

The years 1874 through 1895 saw intense class struggle, much of it centering on the railroad industry. This struggle often took the form of working class self-activity, action organized by workers from the bottom up and carried out independently. Railroad workers did not wait for instructions or guidance from labor leaders, who often advised caution and conciliation with capitalists, but took action themselves.

General Strike in Portugal.

Portugal, General Strike, November 24th 2011

A 24-hour strike in Portugal against proposed austerity measures has grounded flights and halted public transport.

Hundreds of thousands of workers took part in the action, including air traffic controllers, metro workers, teachers and hospital staff.