When the barbarians invade the periphery: the commercialization and destruction of the Catalonian Pyrenees – Miguel Amorós

A 2018 diatribe against tourism, as an industry that is wrecking the natural environment and the social fabric of rural areas, and particularly as it has capitalized on the recent craze for “adventure sports”, which manifest the “primordial capitalist mentality”, “the taste for competition, for overcoming obstacles, for demonstrating endurance, for the cult of hard work, for risk-taking, for exhibitionism”, echoing Günther Anders’ reflections on this new kind of leisure that is exploited for profit and becomes just another variety of “work” for people who are plagued by neuroses generated in the claustrophobic cities and are incapable of the tranquil repose that our ancestors valued.

[Answer to IWA Statement] To our friends across the globe:


Some of you have expressed concern and doubt over the lies and half-truths that the current secretariat of the IWA have been spreading through social media. As you know, at CNT we don’t usually get involved in arguments over the Internet.

The whole world is like a nowhere land called Alicante – Miguel Amorós

A brief, and idiosyncratic, social and economic history of the medium-sized Valencian city of Alicante since the Spanish Civil War, denouncing the negative impact of chaotic development, venal and corrupt politicians, unbridled consumerism, the role played by the automobile in social atomization, the destruction of old working class neighborhoods, real estate speculation, the cynical exploitation of local cultural traditions, the noxious effects of an economy based on tourism, the ruin of traditional agriculture, and the proliferation of hideous skyscrapers in a nauseating panorama of trivialization and degradation that is typical of so many other cities all over the world.

Lessons of the Spanish Revolution - Vernon Richards

Collectivised transport during the revolution

A critical account and assessment of the Spanish civil war and revolution, particularly focusing on the successes and failures of the anarchist organisations, written by Vernon Richards.

The Catalonian affair – Miguel Amorós

A December 2017 post-mortem on the Catalonian independence movement, its origins in the ruling classes of Catalonia, its social base among the middle classes, its goals, its tactical mistakes, its manipulation of the mass psychology of political and media catharsis, and most importantly, its tragic attraction for the pathetic remnants of the anarchist movement of the region, who flocked to the movement with the intention of furthering their identity and social issues, but only demonstrated their bankruptcy and decomposition with respect to their forebears who knew that nationalism was an enemy and fought it tooth and nail.

Libertarian Socialism: Politics in Black and Red

The history of the left is usually told as one of factionalism and division. This collection of essays casts new light to show how the boundaries between Marxism and anarchism have been more porous and fruitful than is conventionally recognised.

Masera, Pedro (1877- 1938)

A short biography of the Spanish anarchist miner Pedro Masera, murdered by the Francoists in 1938

Female combatants in the Spanish civil war: milicianas on the front lines and in the rearguard

Anarchist militia women in revolutionary Spain

An overview of women fighters in the anti-fascist militias during the Spanish civil war 1936-7, written by Lisa Lines in 2009.

Catalan independence: what’s hiding behind the nationalist myth? - Mouvement Communiste/Kolektivně proti Kapitălu

pro and anti independentists

This leaflet was produced at the end of October and therefore before Madrid imposed direct rule on Catalonia... But it still makes the important points!

Miguel Amorós and Tomás Ibañez on the Catalonian crisis – September 2017

Sceptical views on the Catalonian independence movement of 2017 from Miguel Amorós and Tomás Ibañez, who basically maintain that anarchists who join in the nationalist movement, a movement based on mass psychosis and the “marketing” of illusory identity politics (“the Catalonian people is just as abstract a concept as the Spanish people”), thinking they are taking advantage of an opportunity to advance their cause, are being cynically used as the “popular backdrop for a bad play in which an ordinary redistribution of power is being publicly screened”, and later “will have to be punished for snatching their [the Catalonian ruling class’s] chestnuts out of the fire”.