unions

The Hobbit- The Desolation of Warners

Anti-Shorten: The ALP is still selling bullshit

A critique of the rehashed social democracy of the Australian Labor Party. Republished from The Word From Struggle Street - an anticapitalist blog from Brisbane

No Promises: Insurgent Teachers Strike in West Virginia

An analysis of the teachers’ strike in West Virginia from Whither Appalachia?, a new project based in the area.

Wildcat Roars in West Virginia: Teachers to Stay Out on Strike

Thousands of teachers, bus drivers, and other school employees across West Virginia defied union and government orders for a “cooling off” period and returned to the state capitol on Wednesday 28th Feb as strikes and protests continued. Moreover, it appears that many school sites will remain on strike on Thursday 1st March, as the strike grows more and more into the hands of the workers themselves. This post first appeared on It's Going Down.

'Change the Rules': reifying labour under capital

A critique of Sally McManus, the Australian Council of Trade Unions, and the 'Change the Rules' campaign from a communist perspective.

The Rise and Fall and Insurrection of Trade Unionism in Tanzania

Chachage Seithy L. Chachage

An overview of the development of trade unions in Tanzania between the 1920s and 1990s by Tanzanian sociologist Chachage Seithy L. Chachage.

The Development of Trade Unions in Uganda

Roger Scotts history of the development of Trade Unions in Uganda, published 1966.

Iran: Call for demonstrations from the striking workers of the Haft Tappeh Sugar Cane Co.

Striking workers at the Haft Tappeh Sugar Cane Co. on Friday called for demonstrations across Iran tomorrow under the slogan "Bread. Jobs. Freedom." We have translated their statement from Persian and present it in both languages here.

IWW statements on language school organising in Dublin

Workers in Dublin's English language schools have been getting organised!

Women in struggle: The Mansfield Hosiery strike

Mansfield hosiery strike

The strike at Mansfield Hosiery Mills in November-December 1972, involving male and female Asian workers, was a struggle which exposed not only the racialism of the National Union of Hosiery and Knitwear Workers and the management, but also showed the roles played by the Race Relations Board, the Loughborough Community Relations Council, and the Runnymede Trust, who 'are moving to find a new lease of life in the mediating machinery within industry and therefore present an image of management with a liberal face'.