USA

Paterson's Italian anarchist silk workers and the politics of race - Salvatore Salerno

This article traces the Paterson Italian anarchist groups and the repression they faced, as well as looking into their views on race in America.

In the large and sophisticated literature on ethnic consciousness and Americanization among European immigrants, very little is known about how Italians thought about race or about how they came to see themselves and their interests as white. What we know about the period between 1880 and 1920 is largely anecdotal.

American Primitive in Red, Black and White: Race and Class in the U.S. - Loren Goldner

Loren Goldner on the intersections of the questions of race and class in the United States.

A history of Wild Rose Rebellion, 2007-2009

A history of an Iowa-based anarchist group.

by Juan Conatz and R.Spourgítis

Wild Rose Rebellion (WRR) was an anarchist group primarily based in Iowa City, Iowa. Its beginnings can be traced to late 2007, when anarchists involved in a local student antiwar group, infoshop and IWW branch decided they wanted to hold meetings to plan for the 2008 Republican National Convention protests in the Twin Cities.

Toward Theory of Political Organization for Our Time Part III: nature of our period

The Nature of Our Period: looking to an autonomous working class alternative

The end of the twentieth century was a time of transition. The regime of low-intensity warfare, the dismantling of the welfare state, and neo-liberal privatization schemes ultimately was running its course[1].

Towards Theory of Political Organization for Our Time Part II: we are not platformists, we strive to be

In recent times a number of ideological currents from the libertarian communist tradition have inspired a generation to organize, build and reproduce organizations, and struggle around a rethinking of their traditions and future. Much of this theory comes from the period of the greatest waves of proletarian and peasant struggles in the 20th century. That period produced theory of organization based on the protagonists’ position within high points of struggle, its successes and failures.

Coming back to our time, we find ourselves in a situation distinct from say the Friends of Durruti or the Makhnovschina. In our time there are no mass movements that provide a counterpower and pressing threat to capitalism and the state.

Father of Cybernetics Norbert Wiener's Letter to UAW President Walter Reuther

1949 letter from a leading scientist to the head of the American auto workers union warning him about new technology and the negative impact it would have on manufacturing workers.

South Tamworth, August 13, 1949

Walter Reuther

Union of Automobile Workers

Detroit, Michigan

Dear Mr. Reuther,

Review: The American Working Class in Transition by Kim Moody - Root & Branch

Joel Stein reviews Kim Moody's book on the American working class in transition for Root & Branch No. 1, 1970, dealing in particular with Moody's take on the unions.

Strike!: A Review - Root & Branch

Jeremy Brecher's Strike!, reviewed by Steven Sapolsky in Root & Branch No. 4, 1973

Towards Theory of Political Organization for Our Time Part I: trajectories of struggle, the intermediate level, and political rapprochement

Political organization is a collective answer to common problems. People organize based on a collective sense of need, and the perspectives and problems encountered in social groups crystallize into organizational forms and moments. This is a general historical trend; even without a theory, organization emerges to meet concrete needs that cannot be solved except by building social forms to address them.

The end of the twentieth century was a time of transition. The regime of low-intensity warfare, the dismantling of the welfare state, and neo-liberal privatization schemes ultimately was running its course[1].

Why the Leninists Will Win

A criticism of the failure of anarchists and libertarian socialists to seriously organize and how it cedes ground to authoritarian sects.

"We anarchists and Syndicalists - indeed all who believe that the liberation of the workers is the task of the workers themselves - were too poorly organized and too weak to hold the revolution on a straight course towards socialism."
- M. Sergven in the Moscow anarchist newspaper Vol'nyi Golos Truda, Sept. 16, 1918
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