uprisings

Tunisian committees to safeguard the revolution: the example of Bizerte

Since 14th January numerous committees to safeguard the revolution have been set up in many places throughout the country, with a variety of forms, constitutions and functions. Municipal bodies almost everywhere in Tunisia have been swept away, and temporary bodies for managing municipalities have taken their place.

Mass mobilisation, ‘democratic transition’ and ‘transitional violence’ in Africa

Michael Neocosmos on how 'democratic transitions' are about handing power over to (often neo-colonial) 'experts'.

First strong points on the last revolts in Arab countries

Mouvement Communiste and Kolektivne Proti Kapitalu on the North African and Middle Eastern revolts of 2011.

Egypt Revolt at the center of wide social chaos

Since the early Second Postwar, our current kept watching over the events pertaining to Mediterranean Sea, its coast countries and mainly Europe and Middle East (concerning Mediterranean Sea in a geopolitical sense).

The era of riots has started…

The era of riots has started…

Leaflet circulated on 23 February 2011 in the general strike demonstrations in Athens and Thessaloniki, Greece.

Egypt's workers rise up - Joel Beinin

Suez Canal workers' protest, 2011.

Joel Beinin's analysis of the contribution of workers to the anti-Mubarak uprising and the possible consequences for both the social movement generally and the Egyptian working class specifically.

1619-1741: Slavery and slave rebellion in the US - Howard Zinn

Howard Zinn's history of slavery and slave revolts in the United States from 1619 up until 1741.

On food

Food has always been an issue in Egypt, whether happy arguments such as who makes the best tameyya or koshari in town, or the persistent anxiety of Egyptians about food prices and how to make the means to buy enough food. Recently, with the events of the past weeks, I’ve been thinking about food quite often.

The political carnival

A revolutionary, organic, engaged, democratic space has emerged in Tahrir Square. Numbers swell and fall throughout the day, people come and go, but intense and sophisticated political engagement remains a fixture. From debates about the relative merits of parliamentary vs presidential systems, to proposals about consititutional reforms, to suggested programmes of political transition, there is only one thing on everyone’s mind.

The henchman

A strange peculiarity about the Egyptian regime is its insistence on attempting to retain a veneer of legitimacy – even after 30 years of flagrantly falsified elections, torture, corruption and, most recently, an ill-advised Internet blackout that succeeded in making Egypt a trending topic on the instant messaging service.