videos

The quiet mutiny (documentary)

John Pilger’s controversial first documentary film created a sensation when it broke the story of a rebellion emerging within the American army fighting the War in Vietnam. Changing public and media perception of the war, The Quiet Mutiny contributed to the withdrawal of US troops from the region.

In this, the first of his 58 documentary films, John Pilger combines candid interviews and amazing frontline footage of Vietnam to portray a growing rift between the US military bureaucrats - "lifers" - and the soldiers who physically and mentally fight the war on the ground, the "grunts". By 1970, it is an internal sense of disillusionment and frustration born from this rift that is triggering the withdrawal of US forces from Vietnam.

As the US employs psychological warfare against its enemy, Pilger finds himself unable to glean significant information from the military; a press conference he attends is nicknamed "the 5 o'clock follies" for the evasive nature of the proceedings. And so it is with the grunts, the "wheels of the green machine", that Pilger finds a very human side to the US presence in Vietnam: soldiers who are at once ready to serve their country and doubtful of their purpose there. Plied with visits from Miss America and ignored by Vice President Spiro Agnew, they experience the war in a way many of their superiors do not.

Review via - http://www.bullfrogfilms.com/catalog/quiet.html

The War on Democracy (Documentary)

The War On Democracy was John Pilger's first for cinema. It explores the current and past relationship of Washington with Latin American countries such as Venezuela, Bolivia and Chile.

Using archive footage sourced by Michael Moore's archivist Carl Deal, the film shows how serial US intervention, overt and covert, has toppled a series of legitimate governments in the Latin American region since the 1950s.

Behind the mask (Documentary)

Behind the Mask exposes never-before-seen footage that reveals the extent to which these individuals will go to save the lives of animals. People of all ages and backgrounds, from all over the globe, tell their tales of liberation, incarceration, sacrifice and determination.

Behind the Mask is a passionate documentary with a definite agenda that offers a definite perspective on why many members of the ALF are willing to break the law, spend time in prison and even risk their lives to stop the abuse of animals. Some of the animal testing and most of the animal cruelty is illegal but little is done to stop the abuse and enforcement agencies don’t pursue cases.

The New Rulers Of The World (Documentary)

'The New Rulers Of The World (2001) analyses the new global economy and reveals that the divisions between the rich and poor have never been greater - two thirds of the world's children live in poverty - and the gulf is widening like never before.

The film turns the spotlight on the new rulers of the world - the great multinationals and the governments and institutions that back them such as the IMF, the World Bank and the World Trade Organisation under whose rules millions of people throughout the world lose their jobs and livelihood.

Anarchism in America (Documentary)

A colourful and provocative survey of anarchism in America, the film attempts to dispel popular misconceptions and trace the historical development of the movement.

The documentary is the work of Emmy and Guggenheim Award-winning filmmakers, Steven Fischler and Joel Sucher. They take a road trip to map anarchism as a distinctly American tradition. Starting with the premise that Americans embody anarchist principles of freedom and independence, the filmmakers were not disappointed.

The murder of Fred Hampton (documentary)

Fred Hampton was the leader of the Illinois Chapter of the Black Panther Party. This film depicts his brutal murder by the Chicago police and its subsequent investigation

The Murder of Fred Hampton began as a film portrait of Hampton and the Illinois Black Panther Party, but half way through the shoot, Hampton was murdered by Chicago policeman.

Eyes on the prize (Documentary)

Eyes on the Prize is a fourteen hour documentary series that tells the definitive story of the civil rights era from the point of view of the ordinary men and women whose extraordinary actions launched a movement that changed the fabric of American life, and embodied a struggle whose reverberations continue to be felt today.

This is a documentary series about the American Civil Rights Movement, starting in 1952 with the murder of Emmit Till and the subsequent trial and ending with the civil rights march to Selma in 1965.

The ruling classroom

Whilst Ron Jones' The Third Wave has received a lot of attention and been dramatised, George Muldoon's experiments in capitalist democracy involving two groups of seventh graders in Mill Valley, California have seemingly slipped under the political radar...

"I said years and years and years ago that the public school system is like a microcosm for the United States, all of its goods and its bads and its smelly politicians and corruptness can be found in the school system with teachers, administrators and their damn passing the buck from one thing to another."

- George Muldoon, 7th grade social studies teacher.

Living Utopia (Documentary)

A unique feature-length documentary (90 minutes; Spanish with English subtitles) which chronicles the origins and evolution of the Spanish anarchist movement and its important role during the Spanish Revolution (1936-1939)

Living Utopia is a unique documentary that blends the historical account of the origins and development of the Spanish anarchist movement, focussing on the 1936 war. A reflection on the philosophical underpinnings of such a movement and their practical application. As both an informative and inspiring piece of research it is considered a jewel amongst historians and rebel hearts.

The Wobblies (documentary)

The 1979 documentary film The Wobblies provides an overview of the rise and fall of the IWW (Industrial Workers of the World), complete with archival footage, loads of interviews, Wobbly art and songs.

This 1979 documentary established a new, primary-research modus for historical nonfiction—no narrator, no authorial perspective, just original documents and witnesses—but its subject matter was, and still is, its most radical characteristic.