violence

Beating the fascists?: The German Communists and political violence 1929-1933 - Eve Rosenhaft

Eve Rosenhaft examines the involvement of Communist Party militants in political violence against Nazis during the years of Hitler's rise to power in Germany (1929-33).

Paranoia and terror as models of governance – Alèssi Dell’Umbria

A 2011 essay on Mexico’s descent into chaos under the blows of NAFTA and the “drug war”, whose purpose is not only to transform northern Mexico into a security zone for the U.S., but also to hasten “primitive accumulation” (driving peasants off their land—which is then handed over to agribusiness or extraction industries—and into the “colonias” where they will be prey to the drug war and intensive police and military repression) by destroying the surviving communal social forms in “a war against society” that is traumatizing the population but also generating a largely indigenous, assembly-based autonomous movement that is forming militias to defend its communities (e.g., Chiapas).

Charlie Hebdo

A  candle light vigil at the Place de la République, in Paris

Earlier this week, gunmen attacked the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo and murdered several of its cartoonists. Some thoughts on the various issues that have arisen out of this event.

The two anarchisms - legalism and illegalism in the libertarian movement in late nineteenth century Spain - Miguel Amorós

A review of the vicissitudes of Spanish anarchism between 1873 and 1897, with special emphasis on the anti-organizational, terrorist (“propaganda of the deed”), and individualist currents within the libertarian movement, and their disastrous consequences for the development of anarchism in Spain.

Domination and the arts of resistance: Hidden Transcripts – James C. Scott

Cover of Domination and the arts of resistance – James C. Scott

In this book, renowned social scientist James C. Scott offers a penetrating discussion both of the public roles played by the powerful and powerless and the mocking, vengeful tone they display off stage—what he terms their public and hidden transcripts.

The historical cycle of the political rule of the bourgeoisie - Amadeo Bordiga

In this article first published in Prometeo in 1947, Amadeo Bordiga examines the history of the political forms of bourgeois rule and posits that it has passed through two stages (the early “heroic” period followed by the “golden age” of bourgeois democracy) and is now entering its third stage, characterized by the eclipse of “private initiative” and the rise of totalitarianism, as was demonstrated by the forces at work in World War Two, concerning which he says that “the fascists lost the war; fascism, however, was victorious”, because the victors are compelled to employ the “authoritarian and totalitarian methods that were first tested in the defeated countries”.

The Haywood-Mayer-Pettibone case - Louis Adamic

Charles Moyer, Bill Haywood and George Pettibone in 1907

Louis Adamic's excellent history of the trial and acquittal of three leaders of the Western Federation of Miners, Charles Moyer, Bill Haywood and George Pettibone, for the murder of ex-Idaho state governor Frank Steunenberg in 1906.

Can Vies: violent protest as the only answer – Antonio Maestre

In this short article about the recent (May 2014) riots in Barcelona in the neighborhood of Sants in response to the attempt to close down and demolish a popular cultural center known as “Can Vies”, the author argues that the “arrogant” and “irresponsible” attitude and behavior of the City Government forced the “citizens” to resort to violence as a sort of last resort to defend their “social conquests”.

Sorel's reflections on violence and the poverty of voluntarism - Donald Parkinson

Article that discusses Sorel's Reflection On Violence, critiquing its voluntaristic ideas and exploring its relation to fascism.

For a nonviolent revolution - Démocratie Communiste (Luxemburgiste)

An appeal in favor of the principle of a nonviolent revolutionary movement based on means-and-ends reasoning, with references to Marx and Luxemburg.