Lies - a journal of materialist feminism

Lies - a journal of materialist feminism

...[The] more we read and wrote together, the more we desired a means to devise a theory and politics that is inchoate but at least our own. This journal is that: a way to communicate, to be overcome by the feminist commune, to survive with lesser pain or better pain, to become a more precise and effective force.

LIES COLLECTIVE 9

Editorial Note

NOT-SEX AND SOCIAL RELATIONS

C.E. - Undoing Sex: Against Sexual Optimism

CLÉMENCE X. CLEMENTINE - Against the Couple Form

M. SANDOVSKY - Letters to L: Visions and Paranoia

SOGUMI - salt wedge (excerpts)

WORKER’S INQUIRY

JOMO - Caring: a labor of stolen time: Pages from a CNA’s Notebook

NOTES ON STRUGGLE

WENDY TREVINO - Santa Rita 128 to 131

W.&.T.C.H. 111 - On the Recent Occupations: A Communique from W.&.T.C.H.

BARUCHA CALAMITY PELLER - Women in Uprising: The Oaxaca Commune, the State, and Reproductive Labor

JACKIE WANG - Against Innocence: Race, Gender, and the Politics of Safety

Recent Communiques

IDENTITY, ABOLITION, COMMUNIZATION

MAGDA LLWHISK - Don’t try to dig yourself out of the hole. You won’t get out.

P. VALENTINE - The Gender Distinction in Communization Theory

SKY PALACE - “To Be Liberated From Them (Or Through Them)”: A Call For a New Approach

ARCHIVES

“All the Work We Do As Women”: Feminist Manifestos on Prostitution and the State, 1977 217

SUZAN COOKE - “We Referred To It As Coming Out”: Recollections on Trans Identity, State Violence, and 1960s Radicalism

REVIEWS

Normal Life: Administrative Violence, Critical Trans Politics, and the Limits of the Law, Dean Spade

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Posted By

Schwarz
Oct 9 2012 01:42

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  • Materialism cannot be opposed to or purged of ideas. Our writing is not a detour from material relations, but a mode of their refusal; it is a practice of naming what is violent in these relations, of laying it bare and vulnerable to attack.

    LIES Editorial

Attached files

Comments

Shorty
Oct 9 2012 14:22

Wow, this looks really interesting. I've downloaded the pdf and will give it a read. Could be just what I'm looking for. smile

revol68
Oct 9 2012 16:15

Love the name and cover.

Looking forward to "JACKIE WANG - Against Innocence: Race, Gender, and the Politics of Safety", it seems relevant to my interests.

Half way through the first essay on sex and impressed so far.

revol68
Oct 9 2012 18:32

Just finished the first essay "C.E. - Undoing Sex: Against Sexual Optimism" and as I said the first half or two thirds was a very good rejection of essentialism, of the possibility of some "pure" sex or sexuality not bound up in social relations. However the last part does that thing all too typical of Communisation texts, it starts trying to fit the world and it's kitchen sink into "value".

Quote:
From here, sex must be understood as something inextricably determined by notions of value. In sex’s bluntest formation, some bodies produce value — be it babies, satisfaction, beauty, sense of self, etc.
— and other bodies reap the benefit of such value in the exchange of sex. Sex is one moment, among many, that bodies become transformed into a substance to be “enjoyed,” that is, consumed.

This to me not only does a disservice to the "value" as a meaningful category but reduces the complexities of sexual relations to some bloated "value theory". Again as I say this seems to be something of a recurring theme with Communisation texts regardless of what particular facet of human experience it turns it's sights on. Whether it's periodisation and "programmatism" or it would seem human sexuality, everything is shot through with a strong determinism ensuring all cows are black at night.

It's from this point that the essay kind of loses direction or any real discernible point or argument, which ofcourse is again in keeping with much of the communisation genre, instead it seems content to spin through various kind of truisms, problemising certain ideas of "dignity" and "self ownership" yet acknowledging their operative necessity, something a common to communisations discussion of class struggle in general.