December 9th day of action against cuts and fees

Middlesex University.

Tens of thousands of school and university students will walk out of class again today another national day of action against cuts and tuition fees.

Protests have seen demonstrations across the country with occupations at universities, council buildings and political party offices across the UK. More action is predicted to happen as a result of today's day of action.

Reports of police violence and attempted 'kettling' are not expected to put off protesters. Students will likely be joined by others also affected by the austerity measures such as members of the RMT, who are thought to be having a block on the student demonstration on Parliament.

We will update this page regularly as the day develops. Please post local reports in the comments below.

- The day of action on the 9th has had a long run up, with several universities such as Leeds and UCL going into their second or third week of occupation, and new occupations starting at several universities including Goldsmiths. This was also the first time that schools began occupations, with a 24 hour sit-in/teach-in at Camden School for Girls, and another one at Acland Burghley in Camden - mixed reports about what actually happened since the school was apparently closed for the afternoon, but occupiers went in anyway. We have an unconfirmed report of a sit-in at Stoke Newington school, Londonist reported that Islington Sixth Form college was closed all day Wednesday after management heard about student plans for an occupation in advance.

- 12:20pm Several thousand congregating around ULU and Trafalgar Square. Over 1,000 police on duty. 'Rolling kettle forming at ULU, 70 TSG in front' According to @ucloccupation

- 12:30pm Debate starts in parliament, early day motions all ignored by the speaker, so the vote is on in about 5 hours. Hopefully the almost inevitable yes vote may be just the start of the anti cuts movement.

- 12:35pm @directreaction: Police try to stop LSE and Kings students marching over Waterloo bridge. Many break through. Situation already very tense.

- 12:40pm Police have blocked the march at Malet Street according to @ucloccupation

- 12:49pm UCL Occupation has started a live map of the protests with particular attention to police deployments.

- 12:52pm Several people on twitter describe being 'kettled by socialists giving speeches', sounds about right for the Labour left and SWP, let them go!

- 13:13pm @PennyRed "Omg the kids just charged through the line. I can see police beating kids."

- 13:15pm First sighting in the UK of Italian-style literary riot shields http://lsjsn.files.wordpress.com/2010/12/polestyrene-books-13-00.jpg

- 13:25pm @ncloccupation 20 protesters stormed meeting with Newcastle Vice Chancellor.

- 13:26pm - Parliament Square sealed off.

- 13:34pm - Guardian reports that "three protesters have just been ejected from the public gallery in the Commons because they were chanting slogans."

- 13:45pm - LSJSN blog post this youtube video from Trafalgar Square:

- 13:50pm London protest reaches Parliament square.

- 14:23pm Protesters kettled in parliament square, which had previously been declared off limits. Six horses arrived in one corner, fences are being pushed against, six lines deep of riot police behind.[/b]

- 14:35 BBC helicopter shows three metal barriers being carried over the heads of protesters towards police lines.

- 14:45pm People blocking traffic on Vauxhall bridge.

- 14:54 Line of students has formed a human shield to prevent mounted police entering parliament square.

- 14:59 Newcastle Occupation has published photos from the protest there - lots of people, lots of mounted police.

- 15:03 Photo of fences being torn down at parliament square within the past hour.
- 15:33 Police hitting protesters with batons, someone in a wheelchair dragged behind police lines, @PennryRed reports that one of the Guardian's journalists was "beaten bloody" with a baton. Lots of paint thrown at the police. Around Holborn several students with large books trying to push back police lines.

- 15:38pm Horse charge outside Westminster Abbey - caught on BBC News 24.

- 16:30pm Wheelchair user dragged from wheelchair (and then to the ground according to the Guardian) by the police - http://twitpic.com/3ed5tq

- 16:56pm Very large bonfire lit in Parliament square.

- 17:42pm Vote passed, 21 majority.

- 18:09pm What looks like a baton charge by 30-odd police in parliament square visible on the BBC helicopter footage, no mention of it at all in the commentary.

Posted By

Ed
Dec 9 2010 10:00

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Comments

Auto
Dec 11 2010 22:30

Dunno if this was posted already, but government/police are getting seriously fucking jittery:

"Anti-Terrorist police sent to quiz 12-year-old boy over planned protest outside Cameron's office".

Auto
Dec 11 2010 23:06

Okay, I'm now officially fucking enraged...

Alfie Meadows was almost turned away from Chelsea and Westminster hospital because a decision had been taken to 'only treat injured police officers'.

Thank fuck for the integrity of the ambulance driver. Otherwise we would have been talking about a death.

madlib
Dec 12 2010 04:26
gypsy
Dec 12 2010 13:44
Ed
Dec 12 2010 16:47

Glasgow students having it out with police:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YvyfxghZLK0

Inigo Montoya
Dec 12 2010 17:35

Looking to get in contact with any anarchists involved in NCAFAC or in the student struggle in general.

Please drop me a PM cheers.

Incubus
Dec 12 2010 18:23
Quote:
Dunno if this was posted already, but government/police are getting seriously fucking jittery:

"Anti-Terrorist police sent to quiz 12-year-old boy over planned protest outside Cameron's office".

There was also mention in the press about coaches of students being stopped on the way into London for the the demo, also 'riot cops inside Parliament'...plus some stuff on there being more than the usual contingent of armed cops within Parliament grounds (this is possible of-course, which indicates jitters, but could also be propaganda)

...And while the Met publically said they could handle the demo on their own, without outside forces providing 'mutual aid' (Kropotkin spins in his grave...), if you look at the link to that coppers blog I posted earlier, one of them plainly states that the riot cops pictured were from Suffolk...I should think that the event provided some realtime experience for PSU's from outside London to prepare them for the struggles to come...

flaneur
Dec 12 2010 18:46

"Home Secretary Theresa May has confirmed there was "contact" between the Duchess of Cornwall and one of the protesters who attacked her car.

But she did not confirm reports the duchess was poked with a stick during student protests on Thursday
."

Ho ho.

Sidney Huffman
Dec 12 2010 21:55
blackrainbow wrote:
krink wrote:
Speaking as an old fart I'm GUTTED that the unions have still not done anything to support the youth and i think they should be out there with them now not in march or april.

It could be that a considerable section of a pissed off rank and file union membership turn to militant tactics and in the face of condemnation and crackdowns from the leadership break away from the leadership and manage to take working class opinion with them...things could get very exciting next year.

That is something worth working towards rather than 'wait five years and vote labour' which is basically what Unison/Labour councillors said at a PSA meeting I went to. It sounds impossible but who imagined the students going the way they have lately?

Wellclose Square
Dec 12 2010 22:41
Incubus wrote:
Quote:
http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=179218858770566

NCAFC is calling a protest on the 20th of December.

A bit too close to Christmas?

Not too sure about this, it appears to be just one guy on Facebook, withno orgs backing him/it...but then again, that might be a good thing-

I've been periodically looking at this page - a hell of a lot of trolling, both from the usual right-wing suspects and, most significantly, from NCAFC associates (Vicki Morris and someone calling himself Luther Blissett, in particular - who should not in any way be confused with the various post-situ incarnations: he's some kind of proprietorial trot who has Ho Chi Minh as his avatar), the latter implying that it's a state set-up. I don't think it is. If anything, I think it's probably the more 'uncontrollable' elements among school and college-kids who have thought it up and - perhaps unwisely - 'borrowed' the NCAFC logo to lend the event the aura of 'legitimacy' and hence a bit more 'oomph'. I think the 'uncontrollables' - if I may be permitted to borrow the term - are keen to keep the momentum going 'by any means necessary'. It's richly ironic that Luther Blissett bangs on about 'legitimacy', 'organisation', and 'authorisation', in view of the history of the multiple name phenomenon as a means to subvert these shibboleths.

Posters on that page, sympathetic to the 20th December call-out, have in turn accused the NCAFC of being bureaucratic and have averred that the movement is 'autonomous' and 'self-sustaining' and doesn't need to be legitimised by the unions and the NCAFC - even if these groups oppose it, they'll go ahead anyway, as one poster put it. One of the NCAFC-types said the meeting place - Piccadilly Circus at 12pm - would unfairly disrupt tourists (going about their legitimate consumption?), asking why the City of London couldn't be targetted instead - so watch out for a future NCAFC-approved 'Stop the City'...

Also, there's a link there to a facebook page dedicated to a 'Loot £9000 worth of stuff in Tottenham Court Road' set for December 23rd at 5pm, under the by-line 'hit them where it hurts - MONEY, MONEY, MONEY!' I doubt if the NCAFC is giving that clearance somehow. A belated 'revenge of the rookeries' in the making... or not?

mons
Dec 12 2010 23:29

Yeah they way NCAFC are behaving in response to protests not organised by them is revealing, good that others are pissed off at their attempts to control things..

Quote:
NCAFC or not, we dont need anyone's permission to protest.

sums up the way me and others are feeling I think.

But to be fair the accusations they're not militant aren't fair, they refused to condemn any of the protesters' violence, even the attack on the royal family car, etc.

Mike Harman
Dec 13 2010 03:37

Copying Jef's account from another thread -

Jef Costello wrote:
Anyone else go?
Took us a while to find it, ended up meeting some groups near trafalgar square, the official march route seemed pretty empty apart from cops, but we were late. A group of people moved around in Westminster that gradually got split up. At one point a group of 50-150 gathered outside the department for business in Victoria street where there were only a few police and a large stockpile of riot equipment.
We dodged the small kettle but watched 30-odd people escorted by riot police to the kettle in Parliament Square. When we went in to parliament square the atmosphere was pretty good, there had been some metal fencing up that had been torn down. Some groups used the fences and pastic sheeting to make toilets.
The kettle seemed to close for good at 4.30-5. From then on police at each entrance told people that the other entrances were open, although some people must have been let out because numbers did go down a bit. There was some fighting but I didn't see any.
The crowd was getting a bit angry but mostly there was a lot of chanting and singing.
There were some scuffles by Pall Mall. After the vote and as people began to get more and more angry with being kettled people began to crowd at some of the police lines.
Some fences were passed along the top of the crowd, at first they were thrown at the police but that didn't work too well do afterwards the fences were put up to block the police.The police sent a small group through at one point, not sure why, if it was a snarch squad they didn't get anybody.
Then someone started smashin a treasury window, took a long time because it was reinforced glass and there was a panel behind it.
After the windows smashing has spread a bit further along and they'd watched for a while the police attacked and claimed a section of the front of the building, so the crowd smashed the windows further along. The crowd was constantly chanting, with "whose streets? Our Streets" a favourite. When the cops had been pushed back along the front of the treasury after a charge it was good to hear a thousand people shouting "our streets"
The crowd moved along and more windows were hit as well as the doors, there were massive cheers as the doors gave in although the police managed to push the crowd back out. The were cheers and shouts of encouragement as people hit the windows, waved captured police equipment and threw rocks at the police. The crowd chanted "give us our money back" and after a ladder used to batter the door had been grabbed by the cops we demanded that back.
The police were gradually pushing forward along the front of the building and while the crowd was focussed on the doors were preparing a large group to sweep across into the side of us. It ended up with a line of police in front of the treasury.
By this point the chant "No Justice, No Peace, Fuck the Police" had started up.
(During this time might have been when more people were released)
The police then held us kettled for another hour or two, gradually pushing up from victoria street.
About 9pm they opened up the road towards westminster bridge and announced that it was open. The crowd moved along, singing 'we'll be back' and the police line backed off. A few of us wondered if they'd kettle us on the bridge (I later was told by a comrade that he'd overheard police ordering precisely that) but mostly we were please to be moving again. When the police closed in behind us a lot of us thought they'd use a moving kettle to get us to a station, instead as numbers were approaching even (by this point there were maybe 500-1000 people) they kettled us on the bridge until 11:30.
The route to Waterloo was lined with quite a few police and they were making people uncover their faces and had film cameras set up.

All in all a decent demo.

When the police charge there need to be some cool heads because a lot of times the crowd would panic and run. Obviously no one wants to be hit, but people thirty feet away were running full pelt and that's a recipe for disaster. A few people would walk backwards away from the charges calling out 'Don't run, stay calm' and we could have done with a few more at times. I didn't see anybody fall but it was a danger, plus running from police charges only encourages them.

Best chant of the day
"Unemployment and inflation are not caused by education,
bullshit come off it, the enemy is profit" (small group with red and black flag, lost them.

Most popular
"Whose streets, Our Streets"

others songs and chants
No Justice, No peace, fuck the police
Less Kettle more tea
There are many many more of us than you (sadly stopped being true)
Shame on you
Your job's next
They say cutback we say fightback
Solidarity forever
If you think this is illegal clap your hands

Mike Harman
Dec 13 2010 10:59
Wellclose Square wrote:

I've been periodically looking at this page - a hell of a lot of trolling, both from the usual right-wing suspects and, most significantly, from NCAFC associates (Vicki Morris and someone calling himself Luther Blissett, in particular - who should not in any way be confused with the various post-situ incarnations: he's some kind of proprietorial trot who has Ho Chi Minh as his avatar), the latter implying that it's a state set-up. I don't think it is. If anything, I think it's probably the more 'uncontrollable' elements among school and college-kids who have thought it up and - perhaps unwisely - 'borrowed' the NCAFC logo to lend the event the aura of 'legitimacy' and hence a bit more 'oomph'. I think the 'uncontrollables' - if I may be permitted to borrow the term - are keen to keep the momentum going 'by any means necessary'. It's richly ironic that Luther Blissett bangs on about 'legitimacy', 'organisation', and 'authorisation', in view of the history of the multiple name phenomenon as a means to subvert these shibboleths.

Latest comments on there are suspecting it's an EDL thing, given the group that called it is named "UK People's Initiative" that doesn't seem at all impossible.

Incubus
Dec 13 2010 10:59
Quote:
Call on facebook for 'March of Resistance to Education Cuts, London 20 December 2010'

http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=179218858770566

No idea who, if anyone, is backing this

ALERT! Seems this is a false flag demo! Check FB page for comments!

Auto
Dec 13 2010 16:28

I've not had any internet for a while and so haven't been up to date with developments.

What's going on?

Mike Harman
Dec 13 2010 16:32

UCL Occupation ended on Friday, no eviction - they left with some kind of indication from management that they wouldn't be pursued for 'costs'.

Hull uni went into occupation a few hours ago. First one I'm aware of to go into occupation /since/ the fees vote.

These two videos were put up about the police attack on Jody McIntyre - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rQV9P61FUwg and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rQV9P61FUwg

Theresa May is in the middle of talking complete shit to parliament.

EMA protests today but so far no coverage that I've seen. Oh except for David Miliband having a morning photo-op with the NUS #SaveEMA bloke.

Auto
Dec 13 2010 17:05

When's the next day of action? I saw one advertised for the 20th, but apparently that's thought to be false flag?

I do think the NCAFC one (29th Jan) is very, very late.

Auto
Dec 13 2010 17:45

Someone's saying on Twitter that a police snatch squad have arrested two people at a 'Save EMA demo'. Didn't mention where the demo was...

Wellclose Square
Dec 13 2010 19:31
Mike Harman wrote:
Wellclose Square wrote:

I've been periodically looking at this page - a hell of a lot of trolling, both from the usual right-wing suspects and, most significantly, from NCAFC associates (Vicki Morris and someone calling himself Luther Blissett, in particular - who should not in any way be confused with the various post-situ incarnations: he's some kind of proprietorial trot who has Ho Chi Minh as his avatar), the latter implying that it's a state set-up. I don't think it is. If anything, I think it's probably the more 'uncontrollable' elements among school and college-kids who have thought it up and - perhaps unwisely - 'borrowed' the NCAFC logo to lend the event the aura of 'legitimacy' and hence a bit more 'oomph'. I think the 'uncontrollables' - if I may be permitted to borrow the term - are keen to keep the momentum going 'by any means necessary'. It's richly ironic that Luther Blissett bangs on about 'legitimacy', 'organisation', and 'authorisation', in view of the history of the multiple name phenomenon as a means to subvert these shibboleths.

Latest comments on there are suspecting it's an EDL thing, given the group that called it is named "UK People's Initiative" that doesn't seem at all impossible.

Agree, this is looking very fishy indeed...

madlib
Dec 13 2010 19:32
Auto
Dec 13 2010 21:18

Okay, what's the real deal behind the callout on the 20th? Is there any basis for thinking it's been called by the EDL?

Facts need to be straightened out...

Mark.
Dec 13 2010 23:12

Account by a Spanish(?) student at Goldsmiths, taken from Uniriot

Quote:
Parliament Square, London, 9th december 2010. Yesterday, on December 9, I went with a group of PhD students and professors from Goldsmiths College, University of London, to the organized protest against education cuts and an increase of some 300% in university taxes that have been proposed by the British government. It was a cold, sunny day. It was 12:30pm when we began to walk from Trafalgar Square to Parliament Square. The police had cut off access to various streets, so we had to take a roundabout path to get there. Once we got there we were singing, walking along, talking with strangers, sharing impressions, reading placards (‘Even Sadam Hussein believes in free education’, ‘No ifs no buts no education cuts’, ‘The Libcons have put the N in the CU*TS’…).

After an hour we decided to go drink a tea, coffee, or beer in some nearby pub. When we tried to leave we realized that the police had blocked all the exits to the square. There were cordons of riot police that had initially let people in, but not leave. By this method thousands of people were confined in the square (a police tactic that here is called a ‘kettle’). We asked the police very politely if there was another street from which we could leave. They would send us from one street to another, saying yes, it was possible, but it always turned out to be a lie. We asked how long this forced imprisonment would last and they would tell us that they didn’t know, ‘a long time’.

Some police were polite, and some terribly aggressive. One friend who was in England on a student visa became very nervous—she began to shake and cry, worried about what might happen. Resigned, we stayed in one corner of the square, observing everything around us: there were people dancing to the sounds of drums or techno music, people running, people confused by the situation. Contradictory information was spreading up and down the place. In one corner we saw a mass of people intent on breaking the police cordon, but without success. We heard the students’ chants. There were many young students, from about 18 years old, from different parts of England: Manchester, Liverpool, Sussex. The cold began to bite, so we began to walk and dance so as not get numb. We received messages of support from ‘outside’ (many friends wanted to join us but at this point the police wouldn’t let them, so they protested in other parts).

It began to get dark. After hours of standing in the cold, I began to feel like a zombie. We began to make bonfires with whatever we could find: leaves, placards. We tore branches off trees, people burned benches, a security gate that began to give off black smoke. We made the bonfires with people we didn’t know, without speaking, without asking each other’s names or where we were from—it was a mechanical, silent, common and anonymous action. As it got darker, the confusion and tension increased. You felt like a caged rat.

There were groups of young people that would attack people on their own, lone journalists, other youths. These kids were not from the protest. People said (and I believe) that they had been introduced by the police to break the protesters. They acted very efficiently, very fast, so that everyone else couldn’t react. They would punch someone who was alone, then run and lose themselves in the multitude. We saw one very young guy bleeding from his face after one of these brief but intense beatings. Another guy with a super swollen, purple eye.

Many of us began to get scared. We got close to some police in what seemed like a quieter zone. We tried repatedly to reason with the police, without success (except that as the hours passed they would talk more, explain themselves more).

Suddenly a group of protesters tried to break into one of the buildings facing the square (the Treasury building). The techno music blasted everywhere. The police allowed this to happen for half an hour, so that it would be filmed nicely, and then began to charge. People began to run towards us, because we were sandwiched between the stampede and the police lines behind us. Many kids began to cry and plead with the police to let us leave, that we were going to be trampled. They refused.

After a period of tension the situation appeared to calm down. We began to sing carols. We asked the police if they thought we should head to another zone in the square. They told us no, that we were better off staying there. Some kids from Manchester reasoned with them, that they had to catch a bus back home. It seemed like they would let them leave if they showed them their bus ticket. Since they had extra tickets, they passed them to us. It looked like we were going to get out, when suddenly they began to charge towards us, hitting us with truncheons. They shouted ‘Move! Move!’ but without specifying where to—but if you moved wherever they didn’t want you to, they’d hit you.

We went as fast as we could towards another part of the square. There the crowd was very compact, you could barely move. At one police line they started to let people leave one by one. People were pushing in that direction and you were getting increasingly squashed. Many people started to have panic attacks; we tried to give them room to breathe. People started to break some windows and there was a police charge that squashed us even more. Luckily, we were pushed closer to the exit. We were like sardines in a can.

The cops at the police cordon started to talk with the protesters as if dialogue was possible. The protesters passed them by. Some of us got to the exit and were searched. The guy in front of me was wearing a scarf around his face because of the cold. The police got very violent with him, telling him not to cover his face, grabbing him by the arms, pointing at him with their fingers. They told him that for doing that he had to go to the back of the line (and they sent him there). We communicated this to everyone, not to cover their faces, and not to worry, that they weren’t taking photos (there was a camera but they weren’t using it).

We passed by more cops on horseback, and waited for our friends from a distance. A police officer came close to us and asked us with typical British politeness, ‘So did you have a nice afternoon?’ I thought of many replies, but we looked at her in silence and she went away smiling. People near the area where we were screamed ‘Let us out!’. After a quarter of an hour we realized that no one else was coming out. We asked and they told us that they had closed this exit, that the next exit was at Westminster Bridge and that we should leave. Our hearts tightened at the thought of leaving our friends behind.

We managed to get ahold of them over the phone. Some were crying desperately, begging us to help them, that it was intolerable. We could hear them shout from where we were: ‘Let us out!’ We could do nothing. In those moments I felt an intense hatred, something I had never felt before—as we moved away I could not bear to look either at the cops nor at the superbourgeoisie shopping in Victoria. This hatred lasted a couple of hours.

Silently, we went to wait in a pub. There we found some other friends that had managed to get out. We embraced intensely, even though we barely knew each other. We got very emotional. We cried. We laughed. We had not eaten since noon. We could not eat, so we drank beer. We called everyone we knew to tell them—we felt a great need to talk. Our professors called us, worried about the others that they could not reach. Many told us that they were writing letters to the BBC because the way they were covering the news was pathetic. Others were writing to the police because of the anti-democratic nature of their prison tactic.

Hours later, the friends that we had left behind told us by phone or text messages that the police began to charge and push them towards Westminster Bridge after we left. Thousands of people were trapped for two hours more, totally stuck. After 9 hours of imprisonment people began to piss themselves. One friend faked fainting in order to get out. For now they haven’t told us much more—they were in a state of shock due to what they saw on that bridge.

From these events, here are some initial reflections:

- the right to protest was destroyed, showing the actual erosion of British democracy itself.

- the police created these situations of imprisonment and constant humiliation in order to provoke violence (and not the other way around).

- everything is perfectly choreographed for the media (today the only thing they talk about is the supposed violence of the protests—some broken windows and the attack on Prince Charles’ motorcade).

I am proud to have been at Parliament Square yesterday. Today many of us still feel numb but strong, with a great desire to think and act.

John1
Dec 14 2010 00:35

A couple of Aberystwyth University lecture rooms have been occupied as of today. You can see the comrades blog below and their facebook page here

Occupied Aberystwyth University lecture rooms.

I am not involved in the occupation myself. Just passing on info, appologies if this is the wrong place for this.

no1
Dec 14 2010 00:55

Presenter: "Did you shout anything provocative? Did you throw anything that would have incited the police to do that to you?"

Jody - "Do you really think a person with cerebral palsy in a ...wheelchair can pose a threat to a police officer who is armed with weapons?"

Presenter: "But you do say you are a revolutionary."

Jody - "But that’s a word, not a physical action!…Do you think I could have, in any way, posed a threat from the seat of my chair to army of police officers armed with weapons?? This whole line of argument is ludicrous because you are blaming the victim of violence for the violence."

Mike Harman
Dec 14 2010 15:14

http://botherer.org/2010/12/14/the-bbc-and-the-police/ is quite good on the coverage on the day, and a really, really weird interview with Jody McIntyre where the reporter accused him of 'rolling towards' police in his wheelchair and throwing stuff.

Entdinglichung
Dec 14 2010 15:38
Mike Harman wrote:
http://botherer.org/2010/12/14/the-bbc-and-the-police/ is quite good on the coverage on the day, and a really, really weird interview with Jody McIntyre where the reporter accused him of 'rolling towards' police in his wheelchair and throwing stuff.

reminds me of case in Germany during the 80ies, where the cops tried to counter the accusation that one of them had kicked a demonstrater in the teeth with the argument, that this was justified self-defense against somebody who wanted to damage a cop's boot by biting

Wellclose Square
Dec 14 2010 19:01
Auto wrote:
Okay, what's the real deal behind the callout on the 20th? Is there any basis for thinking it's been called by the EDL?

Facts need to be straightened out...

Seems they've disabled the wall because of the 'trolling and spam', but are more than happy to still prominently feature an 'if you recognise any of these scum, report them to the authorities' link, complete with pictures. Crosses my mind that the page could be as much a data-gathering exercise on people 'up for' unofficial protest as an attempt to set up an ambush of protesters, since it's asked people to contact them on the 'people's initiative' email. Sorry to add to the paranoia and not straighten any facts... but didn't a bunch of fascists in Italy in the 1980s once set up a bogus anarchist group so that they could get names and details of anyone wanting to join (no specific references for that, I'm afraid...).

Auto
Dec 14 2010 19:30

Yeah, with the wall disabled it's looking decidedly fucking dodgy. I'm just worried as there seems to be some level support for more grassroots demos outside of the NCAFC framework and so a lot of people are going to be drawn to this 'march of resistance'. I'd hate to see any newly inspired libertarians fall prey to whatever this event is all about...

Wellclose Square
Dec 14 2010 20:21
Auto wrote:
Yeah, with the wall disabled it's looking decidedly fucking dodgy. I'm just worried as there seems to be some level support for more grassroots demos outside of the NCAFC framework and so a lot of people are going to be drawn to this 'march of resistance'. I'd hate to see any newly inspired libertarians fall prey to whatever this event is all about...

Someone's giving it the hardsell on Indymedia

http://www.indymedia.org.uk/en/2010/12/470686.html

The rhetoric rings alarm bells on all sorts of levels, as does the dodgy-looking website that the poster (called Zarathustra(!)) links to. It strikes me that someone is trying to imitate the language of the left and libertarians in a very cack-handed and over-the-top way - a parody, with a dash of Blake (who, for all his brilliance, does have right-wing and nationalist admirers reading their own interpretations).

Malcy
Dec 14 2010 21:55

Um, from a brief 2-second glance it looks like the work of THE OUTLAW.