FAU

Visiting the Freie ArbeiterInnen Union (FAU) in Berlin

An account by a Solidarity Federation member of a visit with FAU members in Germany.

During time spent in Berlin visiting friends and relatives, I decided to contact the Freie ArbeiterInnen Union (FAU) – the German section of the International Workers Association (IWA), of which I am a member of its British section; the Solidarity Federation.

Class Struggle Revamped : An interview with members of the FAU-IWA

2002 newspaper interview of the German anarcho-syndicalist union, FAU-IWA.

The organization of work is becoming increasingly flexible, and new forms of trade unionism are required to meet the challenge. The trade union FAU sees the tradition of "direct action" as a way of achieving that. The paper Scheinschlag spoke with activists Sabine, Nadine, Arne, Peter and Frank (names changed).

What is the Free Workers Union (Freie ArbeiterInnen-Union, FAU)?

International Statement of Solidarity With Cuban Anti-Authoritarians: You Are Not Alone

Statement in support of Cuban Anti-Authoritarian/Horizontalist organizers, workers, activists, artists, musicians y mas in Cuba. Scroll down to see current list of endorsements and the original statement in Spanish.

YOU ARE NOT ALONE

FAU-IWA Supports Polish Workers Against Wage Theft

Picket at Duisburg “Pflanzen-Teufel” store

Along the Low Rhine river, in Germany's outer West and adjacent to the Netherlands, thousands of workers from Poland work under precarious conditions in agriculture and gardening. They get cheated on their wage very often, but sometimes they fight back. The Free Worker's Union (German: Freie Arbeiterinnen- und Arbeiter Union, FAU) does actually practice anarchosyndicalist solidarity with them and thereby demonstrates that borders play no role at all. FAU is the German section of the International Workers Association (IWA).

Gardening and agriculture along the Low Rhine is unthinkable without Polish workers. Their harvest and plant-breeding work is badly paid so that companies hardly employ residents. Yet, finding a job in agriculture and gardening farer away from there, e.g. in Kleve or Borken county, does not automatically imply better working conditions.

Anarchism and the ZZZ in Poland, 1919-1939

Two articles on the history of the anarchist movement and anarcho-syndicalist union ZZZ in Poland between the two world wars.

Scanned by libcom.org from a special supplement of Rebel Worker, the PDF contains two articles: "History of the Polish anarchist movement 1919-1929" by the FAU and "The ZZZ and Poland 1929-1939" by NSF, the Norwegian section of the International Workers Association.

Abolish temporary work! Campaign from FAU-IWA

Statement by German anarcho-syndicalist group FAU on the situation of temporary employment in Germany and recent developments between unions and employers' organisations.

Since social-democrat and green politicians broke down all restrictions on temporary employment in 2003, the number of people paid by temporary work agencies increased from 300.000 to 900.000 in 2010. Many of them have been forced by legal employment agencies to offer themselves to the slave-traders. Temporary workers earn 30% less than their colleagues.

Attack is the Only Way Forward. The struggle of the GGB (Healthworkers Syndicate) Hannover at the Wahrendorff Clinic

An account of workplace organising in a privately run hospital in Germany in 2007.

Berlin 2006: The long road Organizing the unemployed can be as strenuous as trying to repel the Labour Exchange's impudences

An account of welfare claimants' collective organising for their rights in Germany.

Putting pressure on deadbeat bosses: the FAU-Bremen aids member in retrieving unpaid wages

A short account of winning a transport workers' unpaid wages.

Kid Gloves or Bare-Knuckles The Experiences of the FAU-Hannover in Public Sector Strikes, 2005

A detailed account of organizing, radicalizing and participating in a strike at a public health institution, against the context of national negotiations over new pay and conditions for public sector workers.