The Voice of Industry (Vol. 1 No. 30 - 9 Jan. 1846)

voice of industry cover

The 9 Jan. 1846 issue of the Voice of Industry (Vol. 1 No. 30).

Submitted by adri on July 12, 2023

New England Workingmen's Association

All friendly to the cause of restoring to man his natural rights, which is now agitating the working classes of our own and other countries, will bear in mind that the New England Association holds its next meeting at Lynn, just one week from this day (January 16th), and we call upon our brother and sister toilers in the various towns and cities to rally for rational freedom—too long have we been deluded with the empty forms of freedom, while Capital, Patroonery [a patroon was a type of Dutch landholder in colonial New Netherland], and Aristocracy have robbed the people of their right to "Life, Liberty and the pursuits of happiness," and they are fast becoming beggars, dependants and slaves in a land of super-abundance; and whose ensign declares that "all men are created free and equal." We believe from what we know of the workingmen of Lynn, that nothing will be wanting on their part, towards making the meeting interesting and profitable, and giving their fellow laborers a hearty welcome to the time honored town.

The coming Convention, will be of unusual importance to the working classes of N. England. The last one did much towards forwarding the cause of human justice by establishing the "Voice of Industry" as their organ, and through it we have been enabled to awaken a new interest in behalf of neglected humanity and the rights of labor. But we shall not stop here—there are several plans for practical operations, that will be presented for the consideration of the Lynn Convention, designed for the immediate benefit and future redemption of the producing portion of our race. Therefore it is desirable that a full representation of the sober, high-minded and uncompromising friends to free, virtuous and well paid industry, should be present and take part in our deliberations. Friends will you come?

Will papers friendly to the cause, call the attention of their readers to this subject.

Things Lost Forever.

Lost wealth may be restored by industry: the wreck of health regained by temperance: forgotten knowledge restored by study: alienated friendship smoothed into forgetfulness: even forfeited reputation won by penitence and virtue. But who ever again looked upon his vanished hours—recalled his slighted years—stamped them with wisdom, or effaced from Heaven’s record the fearful blot of wasted life?

An Imposter.

We learn, that there is located on Gorham St. [in Lowell, MA], near the Catholic Church, a young Miss, dubbed the "Wonderful Girl," upon the shingle outside. This so called "wonderful girl," by some means or other, (miraculous we suppose) came in possession of a "magic stone," through which she professes to disclose all the hidden secrets of the future, and portray with miraculous wisdom the coming weal or woe, of all who are foolish enough to pay her fifty cents for the revelation.

We understand that the "magic stone" reveals to the Lowell girls, that they will all be married in a very short time—get "very nice young men," for husbands, and enjoy an unusual degree of domestic happiness during a long life. We hope it is true, but advise them to keep the half to expend for "fixens," [food?] instead of giving it to this travelling humbug, who knows as little about their future destiny, as she cares about their present good.

Note: spelling and punctuation have been slightly modified.

Comments

adri

11 months 2 weeks ago

Submitted by adri on July 12, 2023

We learn, that there is located on Gorham St. [in Lowell, MA], near the Catholic Church, a young Miss, dubbed the "Wonderful Girl," upon the shingle outside. This so called "wonderful girl," by some means or other, (miraculous we suppose) came in possession of a "magic stone," through which she professes to disclose all the hidden secrets of the future, and portray with miraculous wisdom the coming weal or woe, of all who are foolish enough to pay her fifty cents for the revelation.

Fun fact, "magical stones" actually played a large role in the origins of Mormonism. Before becoming a so-called prophet, Joseph Smith claimed to be able to locate lost treasures by scrying with stones, a practice/scam which was not at all unique to him in early nineteenth-century America. Later on, he also used "magical stones" to assist him in writing or "dictating" the Book of Mormon.