Revista Argelaga

The show must go on: a modest attempt to explain a world that has gone mad - Argelaga

An editorial published in November 2016 on the website of the journal, Argelaga, on the state of the “spectacle” after Trump’s election, claiming, among other things, that although recent trends indicate that “the spectacle of decomposition is not the decomposition of the spectacle”, in part because “the masses … only want to follow the person who assures them that their addiction to abundant consumption and security can continue”, “the end of the industrial cycle that began after the Second World War” nevertheless entails “constant outbreaks of resistance [that] indicate that, without too much memory and, therefore, with little lucidity, the struggle for emancipation continues”.

Neither your war, nor your peace - Argelaga

A July 2016 editorial on contemporary Islamic terrorism, its origins as an ally of the West in the anti-Soviet war, and its effects on Western society, which, with its “frightened consumers” becoming “racist and xenophobic nationalists”, is “rapidly heading for fascism (a fascism without a führer, anonymous and bureaucratic, like our times)”, published in the Barcelona journal, Argelaga.

Aléssi dell’Umbria’s Istmeño—The Winds of Revolt: a documentary film about resistance against dispossession – Argelaga

A review of the 2015 documentary film about the resistance struggle against the construction of gigantic arrays of industrial wind turbines to generate “clean” energy in Oaxaca (southern Mexico), discussing the resistance movement’s historical background in Mexico’s precipitous descent into the nightmare of the accelerated expropriation of the agrarian population by the economic impact of NAFTA since 1994 and the “police-military narco-state violence” that has been used as a convenient screen for repression and elimination of dissidents, as the country is integrated into the world market and its resources are further opened to foreign exploitation.

The 1984 law - Argelaga

Some reflections on the latest domestic security legislation passed in Spain (July 2015), known as the “Ley Mordaza” (the Gag Law), which the authors see as an attempt on the part of a faction of the Spanish ruling class to forestall a Greek-style crisis by relying, no longer merely on mass conformism (which would facilitate a “Syriza” option), but on the security forces, to preserve “civil security” and the “rights and liberties” of the citizens, i.e., the Orwellian “right to agree with the State’s orders and the liberty to obey them”, because of the “spreading social conflicts” in cities and rural areas, thus imposing a “State of Emergency” without the need for a “coup d’état”.

Riffraff in the libertarian milieu - Argelaga

A timely warning to the libertarians of Spain from the editors of Argelaga concerning an attempt (June 2015), instigated by certain elements in the anarchist camp sympathetic to “Platformism”, to form a citizens’ political party based on civil society slogans (“the people, “society”, and “the majority” vs. “the evil ‘elite’” or “the one percent”), transmitted via the telegraphic text-message-style communications of a “postmodern”, “upbeat” and “trendy” “lexicon”, crafted for an audience composed of “the pauperized and computer-literate middle class, students and local bureaucrats”, fodder for “reformist militantism of the trade union, municipalist, NGO or para-institutional type”.

Disenchantment – Argelaga

An essay on political corruption in Spain published in May 2015, its impunity, its roots in the “partiocracy” that emerged from the “Transition”, its penetration of the Judiciary, and the resulting disenchantment of the population—awakened from its apathy regarding such chicanery now that the economic boom that accompanied the construction of the new Spanish State-form has come to an end—which has led to attempts by political opportunists to rehabilitate the party system by forming new, vaguely progressive “civil society” parties and regional separatist movements, rather than recognizing that “corruption is not the exception, but is inscribed in the very nature of the system”.

Operation Piñata: We Are the Enemy! – Revista Argelaga

Revista Argelaga examines the broader implications of the recent (March 2015) witch-hunt against anarchists in Spain known as “Operation Piñata” through the lens of the “Criminal Law of the Enemy” (Günther Jakobs), observing that the draconian measures implemented to deal with the domestic “enemy”—the excluded and dissenters, now stigmatized as “terrorists”—are plunging us into a “Kafkaesque universe” ruled by “the logic of fear”, and that we face the threat of the emergence of an inauspicious “totalitarian surveillance and control hysteria among the masses of the citizenry” terrified by the economic crisis and the “Jihadist aberration”.

The Return of the Public Order Tribunals – Revista Argelaga

An analysis of the recent totalitarian trends in Spain in the legislative and judicial domains, as exemplified by a recent (2015) Supreme Court verdict sentencing several people to three years in prison for peacefully protesting in front of a government building in June 2011, discussing the continuity between Franco’s Spain and “today’s parliamentary regime”, the myth of “popular sovereignty”, and the concept of “despotism” in its contemporary guise.

The Ideology of Progress in Latin America – Revista Argelaga

An essay “written on the occasion of the premier of the documentary film, ‘Asfaltar Bolivia’” [Paving Bolivia] in Barcelona (2015), denouncing the destructive impact of capitalist development and its hypocritical rhetoric of “progress”, “development” and “modernization”, in the context of the recent nationalist upsurge based on extractive industries and a modified form of globalization that has swept over Latin America as the new populist leaders attempt to impose “modern, consumerist, individualist and predatory lifestyles” to create a “social base” so the “extractivist bureaucracy can consolidate its power” at the expense of indigenous communities and “collective ways of life”.

4F: Something smells rotten in Barcelona - Revista Argelaga

An article written in January 2015 on the occasion of the TV broadcast of a documentary film entitled "Ciutat Morta" (Dead City), about a spectacular case of police brutality and judicial malfeasance in Barcelona, discussing the “new repressive foundations of capitalist society” being laid in the “modern urban agglomerations” that are being turned into “enormous malls and theme parks” and “museums for tourists”, where a militarized urban police force is enforcing an authoritarian campaign of “zero tolerance” social cleansing against picketing strikers, immigrants, squatters, panhandlers and all “recalcitrant elements whose presence constitutes an annoyance for … shoppers and tourists”.