AAUD/AAUD-E reader

AAUD/AAUD-E reader

A reader I compiled from various texts online of the AAUD/AAUD-E.

CONTENTS

The Communist Left in Germany1918-1921 by Gilles Dauvé and Denis Authier

Paul Mattick and Council Communism by Claudio Pozzoli

Council Communism by Mark Shipway

The Councilist Movement in Germany (1914-1935): A History of the AAUD-E Tendency by CICA

Preliminaries on Councils and Councilist Organization by René Riesel

The Origins of the Movement for Workers' Councils in Germany by GIC

Program of the AAUD

Extracts from the Guidelines of the AAUD

Guidelines of the AAUD-E

AttachmentSize
aaudreaderfinal.pdf1.17 MB

Posted By

Juan Conatz
Aug 21 2012 09:01

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Comments

sabot
Aug 21 2012 09:36

Excellent!

klas batalo
Aug 21 2012 20:03
sabot wrote:
Excellent!

agreed!

Juan Conatz
Aug 21 2012 20:09

I suppose I should have clarified that some of these are just selections that directly mention the AAUD or unionens, instead of the entire text of the piece.

rat
Aug 21 2012 20:54

Nice one!
Your work is greatly appreciated.
Dan.

Harrison
Aug 22 2012 00:40
Quote:
Juan Conatz (Liquidationist Faction)

cool

Juan Conatz
Aug 22 2012 05:20

lol, was wondering when someone was gonna notice that

Jared
Aug 23 2012 01:11
klas batalo
Aug 23 2012 05:00
Jared wrote:
This mentions them quite a bit too: http://libcom.org/library/bourgeois-proletarian-revolution-otto-ruhle

Yes this piece is really good! Was translated by CWO who are pretty damn close per se in continuation from KAPD Essen Tendency/ the original 4th Communist Workers International aka the KAI. (fuck yah!)

Anyway mainly it is a really good piece, and should sorta be included.

Juan Conatz
Aug 23 2012 05:22

I didn't include writings from individuals from that period, just historical overviews and organizational documents. At some point, I could make a supplement of writings from members around that era (and later).

This is more meant as a jumpoff, to then get into the writings from people in the groups.

-For example, there were 2 IWW members that came to Germany, were in the AAUD and joined and came up with something called 'National Bolshevism', which is different from the kind we know, but apparently inspired the 'left wing' of the Nazis. Only one article I'm aware of has been translated by them.

-The AAUD-E had a splitoff that I've seen described as anarchist, anti-organizational, and anti-intellectual. They ended up abolishing their group, but ran a paper, almost none of which has ever been translated.

-Also, is there any info out there about the group of council communists (that included Paul Mattick) that were in the IWW and heavily involved in unemployed movements? I came across this and never knew about that.

klas batalo
Aug 23 2012 07:20

there is definitely more down the mattick line there.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Council_Correspondence

there are some links in that wiki that lead to some pretty interesting scans.

i have also heard about these two other things. there is definitely more in a bunch of the readers about the national bolsheviks and some other writings too, mostly about how the main people got kicked out of kapd or something.

yeah i think i remember the split from AAUD-E too but very obscure.

Juan Conatz
Aug 23 2012 08:07

A Wob just sent me this

Left-wing splinter groups in the Weimer Republic
http://bayfiles.com/file/kfsT/XSx9h2/UBC_1974_A8_M54.pdf

Jared
Aug 23 2012 09:26
Quote:
I didn't include writings from individuals from that period, just historical overviews and organizational documents. At some point, I could make a supplement of writings from members around that era (and later).

Thanks for all your current and future efforts! Really valuable

Juan Conatz
Aug 23 2012 09:28

I've also built up the AAUD tag in the library. There were some texts that mention them extensively that weren't tagged.

http://libcom.org/tags/aaud

Iskra
Aug 23 2012 13:37

Nice one!

Just one question: Why nothing on KAPD?

Android
Aug 23 2012 13:45

Kont, read Juan's post above and read between the lines. From what I can tell Juan's interest is in the connections between IWW and German left, which was mainly through figures of Hamburg left and more specifically workplace organisation.

Harrison
Aug 23 2012 15:59
sabotage wrote:
CWO who are pretty damn close per se in continuation from KAPD Essen Tendency/ the original 4th Communist Workers International aka the KAI.

hmm, i think CWO lean more toward the Italian left communists and not as much the KAPD Essen tendency?

Juan Conatz wrote:
Also, is there any info out there about the group of council communists (that included Paul Mattick) that were in the IWW and heavily involved in unemployed movements? I came across this and never knew about that.

I remember reading that PM dropped out of activity in IWW partly due to McCarthyism and anti-communist hysteria...

Android
Aug 23 2012 16:15
Harrison wrote:
hmm, i think CWO lean more toward the Italian left communists and not as much the KAPD Essen tendency?

Yes that's right, but when the group was formed the reverse was the case. Sabotage is right that the group (or more precisely RP, who merged with Workers Voice to found the CWO) translated that Ruhle pamphlet. The name CWO was in reference to the influence of the German left on the group.

Android
Aug 23 2012 16:20
Juan Conatz wrote:
A Wob just sent me this

Left-wing splinter groups in the Weimer Republic
http://bayfiles.com/file/kfsT/XSx9h2/UBC_1974_A8_M54.pdf

This looks really interesting. Thanks for posting for it.

Juan Conatz
Aug 23 2012 16:22
Kontrrazvedka wrote:
Nice one!

Just one question: Why nothing on KAPD?

Because they're a political organization and therefore not as interesting?

klas batalo
Aug 23 2012 18:03

Perhaps these scans should be uploaded. They are pretty amazing read like I said earlier just if because it represents the council communist current that existed in the USA. grin

A neat note about these is that Paul Mattick at the time was very close to the circles around the KAUD and the GIKH (I believe Pannekoek was too in retrospect) and so a lot of the theory behind the United Workers Party and later just the "Council Communists" group seems reflect of that, i.e. seeing the party or revolutionary grouping just being an advanced minority of militants with revolutionary consciousness and that obviously fighting organizations of the proletariat in the Soviets and the "Committees of Action" (which seems an English translation for the factory organizations/Rate phenomenon) were where it was at. That such an organization was just the instrument of encouraging work in that direction, a catalyst like the syndicalists would say.

http://archive.org/details/World-wideFascismOrWorldRevolutionManifestoAndProgramOfTheUnited
http://archive.org/details/BolshevismOrCommunismOnTheQuestionOfANewCommunistPartyAndThe
http://archive.org/details/WhatNextForTheAmericanWorkers
http://archive.org/details/LeninismOrMarxism

klas batalo
Aug 27 2012 05:02

So obviously many of us have been reading over this stuff...so now I have a question or two...

What lessons do we think we can learn from the experience of these general worker's unions (unionen) that were set up in Germany?

A main tenant of revolutionary syndicalism is fighting here and now, not only in a revolutionary situation, I'm agnostic on if that is problematic or not.

My main question is the unionen were based on ideally organization by factory and economic region, i.e. the goal was to organize as class wide as possible.

This supposedly at least to some left communists like Dauve, was in counter-position to the syndicalists at the time who still either wanted to organize by trade or by industry.

In both cases there could be a case for accusations of "workerism" which more accurately could be described as focusing to much on the productive sector and not reproduction as well.

The call to organize on a class wide basis still seems valid to me. It seems to extend from such an argument that we should have generalized organization on the terrain of the whole community, with specialization as needed.

Is this compatible with a revolutionary syndicalist perspective, or does this supersede it?

Harrison
Aug 28 2012 05:26

i would think there comes a point at the height of class struggle where it is necessary to completely drop wage demands. if an anarcho-syndicalist union cannot fulfil that (not saying it can't), then a new mass union / coordination would have to be created to fight solely communist struggles.

if so, no reason why they couldn't mix membership between them as needed, much like the FAUD and AAUD did in Germany.

As to economic region organising (i don't live in country predominantly defined by factory work), i'm not really sure. It kind of feels academic for me where i live, without the presence of a mass communist movement active in the workplaces. Probably for the purpose of encouraging the break with capital, class wide organisation would be the best to agitate for and organise expropriation and defence, but industrial federations would still be needed to organise the flow of production under workers control.

redsdisease
Aug 28 2012 06:05
sabotage wrote:
The call to organize on a class wide basis still seems valid to me. It seems to extend from such an argument that we should have generalized organization on the terrain of the whole community, with specialization as needed.

Is this compatible with a revolutionary syndicalist perspective, or does this supersede it?

Maybe this is over my head, but I don't see why this wouldn't be compatible with a revolutionary syndicalist perspective. I know in the IWW there have been attempts with more or less success to organize people outside of the workplace: the unemployed, squeegee folks and panhandlers, students, and prisoners. Not to mention groups like SeaSol, which I tend to think of as a syndicalist organization, which spend as much time organizing tenants as workers. I think efforts like these should be encouraged and expanded.

This article sort of gets at that idea: http://recomposition.info/2012/08/19/winning-the-war/

Quote:
This will require extending the model of struggle that we employ in the IWW from solely workplace disputes, involving the conflict between workers and bosses, to broader social conflicts in our communities. If we want to organize the working class as a class, we must not only work to build organizations of struggle, but also to build a culture of class solidarity and equality by whatever means possible. I would argue that the best way forward is to extend our model of direct action resistance to capitalism to the community at large, an approach that I term class unionism. The IWW could reach, and organize, a mass of the working class, by working both in the workplace and in the community. In practice, this would effectively mean two complementary modes of organization: the organizing of industrial unions within the economic framework of capitalism, and the organizing of community unions, to oppose the tyranny of capitalist social relations and foster the development of working class identity and culture, within the social relations of capitalist society. The combined social and economic power of such unions – class unionism – would give true meaning to the idea of building the new society within the shell of the old, and exemplify a working class hegemony in opposition to bourgeois society.
Entdinglichung
Aug 28 2012 07:23

will have a look if there are poems by the leading AAUE member Oskar Kanehl translated into English ... another fellow traveller of the AAUE during the early 1920ies, Max Herrmann-Neiße lived in London from 1933 up to his death in 1941, some of his poems from this period are translated into English but these are not particularly radical

Entdinglichung
Aug 28 2012 07:33

a reliable account on the disintegration of the AAUE can be found in Hans Manfred Bock's two studies on the topic (only in German, see below) and in some works on Rühle's biography

* Syndikalismus und Linkskommunismus von 1918 bis 1923. Ein Beitrag zur Sozial- und Ideengeschichte der frühen Weimarer Republik
* Geschichte des „linken Radikalismus“ in Deutschland. Ein Versuch

Harrison
Aug 28 2012 14:19
Entdinglichung wrote:
poems by the leading AAUE member Oskar Kanehl

better than poems by a leading AWL member ? laugh out loud

klas batalo
Aug 28 2012 16:24
redsdisease wrote:
sabotage wrote:
The call to organize on a class wide basis still seems valid to me. It seems to extend from such an argument that we should have generalized organization on the terrain of the whole community, with specialization as needed.

Is this compatible with a revolutionary syndicalist perspective, or does this supersede it?

Maybe this is over my head, but I don't see why this wouldn't be compatible with a revolutionary syndicalist perspective. I know in the IWW there have been attempts with more or less success to organize people outside of the workplace: the unemployed, squeegee folks and panhandlers, students, and prisoners. Not to mention groups like SeaSol, which I tend to think of as a syndicalist organization, which spend as much time organizing tenants as workers. I think efforts like these should be encouraged and expanded.

This article sort of gets at that idea: http://recomposition.info/2012/08/19/winning-the-war/

Quote:
This will require extending the model of struggle that we employ in the IWW from solely workplace disputes, involving the conflict between workers and bosses, to broader social conflicts in our communities. If we want to organize the working class as a class, we must not only work to build organizations of struggle, but also to build a culture of class solidarity and equality by whatever means possible. I would argue that the best way forward is to extend our model of direct action resistance to capitalism to the community at large, an approach that I term class unionism. The IWW could reach, and organize, a mass of the working class, by working both in the workplace and in the community. In practice, this would effectively mean two complementary modes of organization: the organizing of industrial unions within the economic framework of capitalism, and the organizing of community unions, to oppose the tyranny of capitalist social relations and foster the development of working class identity and culture, within the social relations of capitalist society. The combined social and economic power of such unions – class unionism – would give true meaning to the idea of building the new society within the shell of the old, and exemplify a working class hegemony in opposition to bourgeois society.

real quick, i guess i also just wonder what folks think about this in regards to workplace organizing by region, essentially if a corridor or geographic based campaigns, maybe coupled with industrial unionism makes sense. and by unionism i actually mean it more in this organization self-organized by the workers themselves which brings out the best spirit of the german experience and other syndicalist experiences.

i definitely think there should be larger community unionism as well. i do wonder since a big theme here is the non separation of the political and economic, if there should really be a separation other than objective ones between the idea of the proletariat split between producers and consumers. i've brought this up in other threads before but it would make sense to be to have general coalitions that could include community unions and workplace unions. because if we are talking really about "class" unionism focused on the gathering the widest span and struggle then really it would seem we need to find ways to organize the whole class in support of more atomized fights.

Entdinglichung
Aug 29 2012 07:21
Harrison wrote:
Entdinglichung wrote:
poems by the leading AAUE member Oskar Kanehl

better than poems by a leading AWL member ? laugh out loud

they are definitely better (but less good than the poems of Max Hermann-Neiße who was one of the leading expressionist poets) ... due to the attachment of a couple of writers and artists to Pfemfert's Die Aktion, first the KAPD and than the AAUE had quite a number of fellow travellers in the world of art e.g. the playwright Carl Sternheim during the early 1920ies ... a list of contributors to Die Aktion 1911-1932: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Die_Aktion#Published_artists_and_writers ... I would love to own the journal's reprint

Harrison
Aug 29 2012 16:48

Die Aktion literature and art connections i thought were very impressive... especially its interrelationship with the 'cologne progressives'.

what about Gorter's poetry? any good in your view?

Entdinglichung
Aug 30 2012 07:13
Harrison wrote:
Die Aktion literature and art connections i thought were very impressive... especially its interrelationship with the 'cologne progressives'.

what about Gorter's poetry? any good in your view?

the further he became involved into politics, the more the literary quality of his poems declined ... same with Henriette Roland-Holst