History

Transnational feminism's radical past: Lessons from Italian immigrant women anarchists in industrializing America

An article by Jennifer Guglielmo on the activism of Italian immigrant anarchist women in the US during the early twentieth century.

Cavani, Renzo (1901-1966) aka Bruno

Renzo Cavani

a short biography of anarchist bricklayer Renzo Cavani who twice tried to kill Mussolini

The Mold riots: The summer of ‘69

The story of the 1869 riots in Mold, Wales. Following a trial in which miners were convicted of assaulting their manager, soldiers fired on angry protesters, killing four and injuring dozens.

Cores, George 1869-1949

A brief autobiography of George Cores an English anarchist active for over sixty years.

The Spanish Civil War - Osprey Book Collection

The Spanish Civil War of 1936-39 was of enormous international as well as national significance. In this gripping volume, Frances Lannon explains how this internal conflict between democracy and its enemies escalated. Featuring specially commissioned full-color artwork, this study depicts the fighting men of the Nationalist, Republican forces and The International Brigades that strove to take control of Spain alongside their German, Russian and Italian allies.

Revolution and counterrevolution under colonial rule: And now? – Ngo Van Xuyet

The last chapter of Ngo Van’s book, Revolution and Counterrevolution under Colonial Rule, first published in French in 1997, denouncing the Stalinism of Ho Chi Minh’s repressive party-state, depicting the disappointing consequences of the triumph of the counterrevolution in Vietnam with the “victory” of 1975 when the enormous sacrifices of the Vietnamese peasants resulted in merely the exchange of one set of rulers for another, and quoting the Vietnamese author Bao Ninh: “So much blood spilled—for what?”.

Heroin and Italy's 'Disappeared' Generation - Emilio Torrini

Heroin

An article describing the devastating effects of the Italian Mafia (with conspiracy theories alleging CIA assistance) disseminating cheap heroin within anti-establishment circles in 1970s Italy.

Death of Eduardo Escot Bocanegra, Andalusian libertarian shipped to the Nazi Camp in Mauthausen

In the early hours of 23 May 2015 Eduardo Escot Bocanegra died at home in Rosny-sous-Bois in France of heart and lung failure. He was 95 years old and one of the last Andalusian and Spanish republicans deported to the Mauthausen camp. His death represents a huge loss in that it flags up the final extinction of eye-witnesses to the ghastliness of the Nazi concentration camps. And the question still lingers as to whether society and state institutions gave these victims their due.

Teresa Rebull, dead at the age of 30 – Pepe Gutiérrez

An obituary published in April 2015 on the occasion of the death of Teresa Rebull (1919-2015)—scion of a well-known libertarian family, sister-in-law of David Rey (a/k/a Daniel Rebull, co-founder of the CNT), textile worker at the age of 12, member of the POUM since 1936, volunteer nurse during the Civil War, participant in the May Days of 1937, prisoner of the Stalinists in a “cheka” in Barcelona, exile in France, participant in the French Resistance, and singer-songwriter of the Catalonian folk music revival of the 1960s, among other things—a remarkable woman and one of last survivors of a generation of women who “tried to win the war by carrying out the revolution”.

Man! and the International Group: American anarchism’s missing chapter

A paper by Hillary Lazar about Man!, an anarchist newspaper produced during the 1930s.