History

Germany, September Crisis 1848

Brief sketching of the developing revolution within the German states, particularly Frankfurt and Berlin.

‘Women Against Pit Closures’ during the 1984-85 British Miners’ Strike.

Women Against Pt Closures member attacked by police at Orgreave

During the 1984-85 British Miners’ Strike, women’s groups emerged in various forms and for various purposes. Calling themselves ‘Women Against Pit Closures’, these groups across the country organised not only strike-oriented activities, support and community needs provision, but also came to act autonomously on gendered interests. In what follows I outline a brief history of the miners’ strike, the origins of womens’ activities within this strictly gendered strike and the ways in which womens’ roles were transformed through struggle, not only with the Thatcher government and the NCB, but also with men and the NUM.

‘Women Against Pit Closures’ 1984-5

Women Against Pit Closures, Barnsley Rally

A short history of the Women Against Pit Closures Movement during the 1984-85 Miners Strike

Tsesnik, Grigori Anatolievich or Antonovich (1890-1938)

A short biography of Grigori Tsesnik, Russian anarchist hounded by the Soviet authorities

Ours to master and to own: workers' control from the commune to the present

Workers control demonstration in Argentina

A detailed account and analysis of instances of the working class taking control of production from the late 19th century onwards, by Dario Azzellini and Immanuel Ness.

The 14 October 1973 Thai uprising

Street battle during the uprising

A short overview of the successful uprising in Thailand following a wave of wildcat strikes which toppled the military dictatorship and forced the introduction of democratic elections.

Bolshevik repression against anarchists in Vologda

Passage Hotel

A short account of the Bolshevik repression against the anarchist movement in Vologda in the years immediately after the Russian Revolution of 1917

The Situationists and May 1968 – Miguel Amorós

A brief review of the role played by the situationists, the enragés, and the Council for the Maintenance of the Occupations (CMDO—composed of “about forty people”) in the movement of May 1968 in France, which the situationists claimed was an aborted “revolution”, but whose “only major victory”, according to Amorós, was “its survival in memory” for, “contrary to the assertions of the SI, the modernization of capitalism and the general proletarianization of the population … did not produce new, broader, and more intransigent forces of denial”, as the spectacle “subjugated its antagonists by manipulating their desires and satisfying false needs”, and its “mercenary thinkers finished the job”.

Manuel Escorza del Val (1912-1968). A biographical note – Agustín Guillamón

A brief biographical sketch of the remarkable life of Manuel Escorza del Val (1912-1968), who, disabled by polio when he was a child, but possessing a formidable intellect and an indomitable will, was an active member of the Libertarian Youth and the Peninsular Committee of the FAI, and then the chief of domestic intelligence for the CNT-FAI during the Spanish Civil War—a ruthless persecutor of fascists, priests and “incontrolados”, and “the most powerful figure in the CNT” in April-May 1937 when he played a decisive role in the outbreak of the May Events—and, after the war, he emigrated to Chile, where he wrote literary and cultural review articles for local newspapers.

Communist armed struggle in Belgium: An introduction to the CCC and their ideological ground

The CCC were a Belgian communist armed struggle group that was active in the mid-eighties. They did not only place bombs but they also produced a lot of propaganda material, that intellectually fed their different campaigns and they kept writing and publishing during their imprisonment. Upon a few of these documents, this article aims at reflecting on how the group conceived itself and the use of armed struggle as part of a larger communist revolution.