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Solidarity forever: an oral history of the IWW - Stewart Bird, Dan Georgakas and Deborah Shaffer

Supporters of the Industrial Workers of the World parade in Hibbing, Minn. 1916

A fantastic oral history of the revolutionary Industrial Workers of the World union, based on interviews done for the award-winning documentary, The Wobblies (1979). Compiled by filmmakers Stewart Bird and academy-award-winning director Deborah Shaffer, with historical introductions to each section of interviews by labor historian Dan Georgakas.

Contains accounts and articles by Bruce "Utah" Phillips, Jack Miller, Joseph Murphy, Sophie Cohen, Irma Lombardi, Dominic Mignone, Irving Abrams, Henry Pfaff, Vaino Konga, Irving Hanson, Jack Miller, Nels Peterson, Violet Miller, Mike Foudy, Katie Pintek, Roger Baldwin, Art Shields, George Hodin, Fania Steelink, Frank Cedervall, James Fair, Fred Hansen, Phil Melman, Art Nurse, Nicolaas Steelink, Tom Scribner, Fred Thompson and Ralph Chaplin.

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SolidarityForeverOCR.pdf10.84 MB

Comments

Steven.
Jul 30 2016 10:31

I'm excited to have this book online at last. It's been awhile since I read it but it's one of my favourite "political" books I've ever read, a really excellent set of first person accounts.

I would really like to get this text OCRed to get each account up in the library separately in text version. If anyone could help with that it would be much appreciated

Wobbly
Jul 31 2016 21:37

There are issues with the book. Steamships and railroad lines are confused, non-English words routinely wrong, different accounts conflated (Fred Thompson's two trials become one, with the number of defendants affected). People express patriotic sentiments that in letters they strongly denied ever having uttered. It seems the transcriptions were by people not familiar with the underlying facts, and did not afford the subjects the opportunity to review and correct them.

Steven.
Jul 31 2016 22:10
Wobbly wrote:
There are issues with the book. Steamships and railroad lines are confused, non-English words routinely wrong, different accounts conflated (Fred Thompson's two trials become one, with the number of defendants affected). People express patriotic sentiments that in letters they strongly denied ever having uttered. It seems the transcriptions were by people not familiar with the underlying facts, and did not afford the subjects the opportunity to review and correct them.

Could you be a bit more specific? It's been awhile since I have read it, as I think it would just be helpful to be specific about what and where the errors are so people know what to bear in mind