repression

Letter from imprisoned may day protesters in Iran's Gharchak prison

On May May first, there was a protest in front of the Iranian parliament. Police cracked down on protesters and arrested many individuals. After 126 days, three of them, all women, remain incarcerated. Two of these women are held in the Gharchak prison, infamous for it's harsh conditions and severe shortcomings. Recently, one of them wrote a letter regarding their situation.

The Ghosts of Peterloo

EP Thompson's landmark essay exonerating the Peterloo martyrs and incriminating the authorities.

Former child detention center staff speaks out: “This is Legalized Kidnapping”

Recently, It’s Going Down was approached about publishing a testimony by a former Child Detention Center staff employee, Ramona Benitez. Their report details what they saw during several years inside one of the facilities operated by a non-profit currently running a child prison in Chicago: the Heartland Alliance. What follows is their story.

A Look Inside Solitary Confinement in Texas: The Legal Practice of Mental and Psychological Torture from the War on Terror to the War on Prisoners

Revolutionary prisoner Jason Renard Walker writes on the practice of solitary confinement. Content warning for discussion of self-harm and related subjects. All of Jason's writings can be found at his new site, Jason's Prison Journal.

Still in Solidarity from Solitary: Message From Inside Suwannee Correctional Institution

Incarcerated Fellow Worker Ezzial Williams speaks out from solitary confinement. Ezzial is serving 18 months Close Management for 'inciting a riot' in the weeks leading up to the August 21st 2018 nationwide prison strike. This article previously appeared in the Industrial Worker.

Shaky claims and shaggy lion stories: a look back at a few great smears

Experimenting with throwing cement. Credit: Sam Gehrke/Williamette Weekly

A review of a few particularly memorable inventions from the imagination of police, media, and far-right trolls.

Esperanto Banned 70 Years Ago

Short account of the banning of Esperanto and the beginning of persecution of its speakers in Nazi Germany.