insurrectionary anarchism

Occupy Everything: Anarchists in the Occupy Movement 2009-2011

Since the first day that Zuccotti Park was occupied there has been a shadowy figure haunting Occupy Wall Street. The anarchist. Who is this anarchist? What role has she played in the Occupy Movement? What would Occupy be without him?

Attentat

An anonymously written journal composed of essays on nihilist ideas, history, strategy, and critique.

Willful Disobedience - Wolfi Landstreicher

The collected writings of Wolfi Landstreicher's Willful Disobedience. Originally published as a zine from 1996 to 2006, Willful Disobedience was a continuously evolving provocation directed towards anarchists and fellow vagabonds to dig deeper into critical thought and joyous rebellion.

Review: The End of anarchism? by Luigi Galleani

A review by Paul Avrich of Luigi Galleani's The End of Anarchism?.

We Can Learn to Live Free

Give the human race a little credit. We can surely learn to live free, neither dominant nor submissive.

The two anarchisms - legalism and illegalism in the libertarian movement in late nineteenth century Spain - Miguel Amorós

A review of the vicissitudes of Spanish anarchism between 1873 and 1897, with special emphasis on the anti-organizational, terrorist (“propaganda of the deed”), and individualist currents within the libertarian movement, and their disastrous consequences for the development of anarchism in Spain.

Professional anarchy and theoretical disarmament: On insurrectionism - Miguel Amorós

A critique of insurrectionism written in 2007, focusing on the life and works of Alfredo Bonanno.

Plain Words - Unknown

'Plain Words' was found at the site of a series of bombings against capitalist targets in 1919, including billionaire John D. Rockefeller and Attorney General Alexander Palmer. The prime suspects were Galleanists, followers of insurrectionary anarchist Luigi Galleani (1861-1931), founder and editor of the newspaper 'Cronaca Sovversiva.' Published for over 15-years almost entirely in Italian, the magazine made a strong case for "propaganda by the deed," that is: revolutionary violence as opposed to simply propaganda by the word.