Sudan

The Crisis of the Sudanese Regime

It was the tripling of bread prices which sparked off the current revolt in Sudan. People first took to the streets in the town of Atbara in north eastern Sudan on 19 December 2018, but they did not restrict their demands to bread even though some had not managed to find any in four days. They had had enough of the brutal military dictatorship of Omar Hassan al-Bashir which has ruled the country since 1989. The protestors not only demanded “freedom, peace, and justice” but also echoed the slogan of the 2011 Arab Spring that “the people want the fall of the regime.” As a symbol of their wider political demands, the ruling party headquarters in Atbara was burned to the ground.

Protests across Sudan against austerity measures and price rises

Qassim Badri attacks a student

Protests have erupted across Sudan in response to a doubling of bread prices. At least one high school student has been killed, and the Dean of a womens' university was filmed beating protesting students in Khartoum.

1985: Sudanese General Strike Against Dictatorship

Sudanese celebrate the downfall of Numeiri

In 1985 workers and students protested and struck against worsening living conditions and greater repression, in particular the imposition of Sharia and conflict in the south.

1964: Sudanese General Strike

A general strike successfully defeated the ruling military Junta and temporarily halted a campaign of discrimination against the countries southern population. This event is known as the October Revolution.

Sudanese protest movement gathers pace

Over the last six weeks, Sudan has seen the birth of a decentralised and leaderless protest movement against the government, known as the “Sudan Revolts”. This is in response to the virtually bankrupt Sudanese government has scrapped all fuel subsidies, and has more than doubled the price of petrol.