Unemployed take food from Mercadona and Carrefour in mass action in Andalucia

The Spanish field workers union the SAT has gone en masse to two supermarkets to take food by direct action.

Submitted by fingers malone on August 8, 2012

Unemployed fieldworkers and other members of the union went to two supermarkets, one in Ecija (Sevilla) and one in Arcos de la Frontera (Cadiz) and loaded up trolleys with basic necessities.

They said that the people were being expropriated and they planned to “expropriate the expropriators”.

In Arcos the police blocked the doors of the supermarket and prevented them from leaving, but in Ecija, due to other demonstrators creating a diversion, they managed to leave with twenty trolleys of food.

The foodstuffs, including milk, sugar, chickpeas, pasta and rice, have been given to charities to distribute, who say they are unable to cope with all the requests for help they receive.

Unemployment in the Sierra de Cadiz is now 40%. The union say that Mercadona, one of the supermarkets concerned, has a huge number of complaints against them for bullying and persecution of workers.

Comments

Jason Cortez

11 years 10 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by Jason Cortez on August 8, 2012

Strangely (at least for me) first heard this here

Let 's hope this spreads

Caiman del Barrio

11 years 10 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by Caiman del Barrio on August 8, 2012

Video:

[youtube]KqNWJPGgFI[/youtube]

(btw am I the only person who can never see embedded videos in comments?)

fingers malone

11 years 10 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by fingers malone on August 8, 2012

[youtube]*rKqNWJPGgFI&*[/youtube]

caiman, do the video like this, without the asterisks

fingers malone

11 years 10 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by fingers malone on August 8, 2012

Jason Cortez

Strangely (at least for me) first heard this here

Let 's hope this spreads

Yeah I saw that on facebook too, but they've got loads of the facts wrong, so I thought I should do a better write up.

Caiman del Barrio

11 years 10 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by Caiman del Barrio on August 8, 2012

fingers malone

[youtube]*rKqNWJPGgFI&*[/youtube]

caiman, do the video like this, without the asterisks

Yes I know but they never load for me, I have to quote the post then copy the URL into Youtube...

fingers malone

11 years 10 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by fingers malone on August 8, 2012

They've announced that they are going to issue arrest warrents for some of the people involved in the Seville one.

801

11 years 10 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by 801 on August 8, 2012

This is fantastic, should the faces be pixellated? Sure they're all over cctv anyway but still...

fingers malone

11 years 10 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by fingers malone on August 8, 2012

I did think about that, but they were doing the action very publicly, also I took the photo from a Spanish newspaper, so the Spanish police aren't going to get any photos of anybody from libcom that they don't have already.....

fingers malone

11 years 10 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by fingers malone on August 8, 2012

I don't like that report at all. It makes out to be all about Gordillo when it is not, and says that no NGOs have reported lack of food- how can they know that? I'm sure the SAT have better contacts in the region than they do. What, did the newspaper speak to every church, soup run and homeless shelter in the whole of the Sierra de Cadiz, and everybody said they were doing fine thanks? Anyway it is clearly just a lie. I left about 15 months ago, and there were already reports of people fighting over the leftover food in the dustbins.

Steven.

11 years 10 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by Steven. on August 8, 2012

Great stuff, thanks for the report! Please let us know how it develops

Steven.

11 years 10 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by Steven. on August 8, 2012

BTW I have seen this being shared by relatively apolitical friends of mine on Facebook

fingers malone

11 years 10 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by fingers malone on August 8, 2012

Oh nice one.

There are posts going up on facebook calling for a boycott of Mercadona until they drop the charges, also this nice picture

http://a1.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/293102_400684659981537_13014974_n.jpg

It says "I also pushed the trolley"

fingers malone

11 years 10 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by fingers malone on August 8, 2012

http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRKeE2qpa0VSaiwTuroB3_q6knGXis6ipuKHf_RM51dczU0BQS6

Harrison

11 years 10 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by Harrison on August 8, 2012

autoreduction !

MT

11 years 10 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by MT on August 9, 2012

is this the same story as the one i've read today in the major newspaper that it is organized by a prominent MP? a Spanish comrade also told me that this guy is a mayor of the city and was a leader of SAT (still is?...). and that SAT is a radical communist union (not in the libertarian meaning of the word). could someone clarify?

Chilli Sauce

11 years 10 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by Chilli Sauce on August 9, 2012

This is awesome. Thanks for the write-up Malone.

wojtek

11 years 10 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by wojtek on August 9, 2012

@MT

The mayor of the Seville town of Marinaleda, Juan Manuel Sánchez Gordillo, promised on Wednesday a repeat of the extraordinary scenes he orchestrated the day before, when he led hundreds of members of the Andalusian Union of Workers (SAT) in robbing products from two supermarkets. The Robin Hood-style escapade was carried out, Sánchez Gordillo explained, because "someone has to do something so that families can eat."

The politician, who has been mayor of Marinaleda for 33 years and is also a deputy in the Andalusia regional government for the left-wing grouping United Left (IU), spent Wednesday on a Seville estate that belongs to the Ministry of Defense. Sánchez Gordillo and his supporters occupied the land just over two weeks ago.

While the media was there in force, given the furor over the supermarket thefts the day before, there was no sign of the authorities, despite the fact that the interior minister, Jorge Fernández Díaz, ordered the arrest of the perpetrators of the theft.

Sánchez Gordillo did not take part in the robbery of goods at the Mercadona supermarket in Écija, but was outside the store, directing the operation with the use of a megaphone. At the same time, the general secretary of SAT, Diego Cañamero, entered a Carrefour store. Each group took around a dozen shopping carts filled with sugar, oil, milk and other staples, and left without paying.

But no NGO had put out a request for the items, and food banks reported that they have sufficient supplies without having to resort to stolen goods

Robin Hood mayor promises more supermarket food raids: Renegade leftist also leads squatter takeover of military base

And there's this article as well:

Rogue mayors stand firm in Seville after arrest of union members for store raids

MT

11 years 10 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by MT on August 9, 2012

oh, thanks a lot!!

Mark.

11 years 10 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by Mark. on August 9, 2012

MT

and that SAT is a radical communist union (not in the libertarian meaning of the word). could someone clarify?

Some background on SAT on this thread

fingers malone

11 years 10 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by fingers malone on August 9, 2012

Gordillo is getting a lot of the press attention but that's the media in my opinion, they want to focus it that way. Gordillo himself also likes to be the centre of attention but there were two hundred workers on that action. He isn't the mayor of "the city" if you mean Sevilla, he's the mayor of Marinaleda, a small village built on occupied land. That news report quoted above wants to make it all about Gordillo and not about the workers because it's "a scandal" and because they want celebrities not working class colective action.

To say the SAT are a radical communist union is fair enough I think.

wojtek

11 years 10 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by wojtek on August 9, 2012

Perhaps I'm being unfair, but I think the original libcom article is misleading in that by not mentioning Gordillo or how these actions were brought about, it gives the impression that this was an autonomous, self-organised affair. What do you think? x

fingers malone

11 years 10 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by fingers malone on August 10, 2012

Thanks Jim.
Look, I'm not in Seville now, I'm in London. The reports I read (from the SAT and other mainsteam press sources) just talked about the action. I based what I wrote on them. The first thing I saw making a big fuss about Gordillo was when Mark posted that link to El Pais so I wasn't hiding anything from you. I don't know how the action was organised, as I said I'm not there, but I don't think the fact that the news article focuses on him tells you much more than that the newspapers are like that. The right wing press always make a big thing whenever Gordillo is in some action like "oh, it's disgusting, look at IU, supposed to be a respectable party, and look at their representative in this picket line blah blah blah" and the not so right wing media focus on him for a human interest story "the renegade mayor" or because they know who he is.

As Jim says Gordillo was outside, shouting on a megaphone. I don't think every action where he turns up, shouts through a megaphone, and then speaks to the press, means he is leading the action or has organised it. The SAT do direct action all the time, I've done direct action with them and Gordillo wasn't leading me.
The SAT is a big union, it has 20,000 members, they do direct action all the time, and they have their leaders and their media stars but to be honest there is a pretty crap culture of the "big man" in all the organised class struggle I saw in Andalucia and they were no worse for that than anyone else.

Mark.

11 years 10 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by Mark. on August 10, 2012

Not much to add here but from what little I know I'd agree with fingers about SAT and also that the El País English report was pretty poor - their reporting in Spanish is better, though not necessarily to be relied on.

fingers malone

11 years 10 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by fingers malone on August 10, 2012

Yeah I got the feeling that the English report was making an exotic story about the renegade mayor, which they wouldn't publish in a Spanish edition because everyone in southern Spain would be "Gordillo is a rebel, yeah and?"

fingers malone

11 years 10 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by fingers malone on August 10, 2012

For clarification, I don't think the SAT policy on having elected mayors in some villages is a good thing, nor the culture of having the same blokes speaking on the megaphone at every event for years and years, what I'm trying to say is
1. That El Pais report is crap, don't bother with it, read some reports from the local press if you want some normal reporting, or read what people are saying on facebook or on the SAT website
2. It is very problematic that a lot of struggles will look for support from IU politicians to help them, a housing struggle I was in spent months trying to get Gordillo to have a meeting with them in Parliament (which he did) and La Corrala de Vecinas La Utopia went to a session in parliament (there's a video of it on that thread) which they all walked out of in disgust, and I think it's Gordillo who has put forward the motion for them to have the water and electricity reconnected. A different politician in IU was then the person in charge of evicting the old people in a different housing struggle that we were supporting. So of course yes I don't want politicians from IU involved in our struggles (I am an anarchist after all) however I think it's very misleading to say that because Gordillo is there at the action then the action is all about him and that he organised it, just because El Pais says so, in an edition only aimed at tourists.
3. In my experience of class struggle, it involves a whole load of shit. How much and what exact kind of shit you are prepared to put up with to be involved depends on your assessment of the situation really.

fingers malone

11 years 10 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by fingers malone on August 10, 2012

Wojtek, look, if you think it's misleading, then I'm sorry, but how do you think the reports should be written then? I mean, I knew Gordillo was there (because I can see him in the video, but if I post up a video where you can see he's there, I don't think I'm doing a very good job of misleading you) but I didn't think anything of it, he does usually go on SAT protests, as far as I know he's been a member of the union since the 70s. I didn't report that he was there because I'm not his free publicity team and I'm not very interested in reporting where he goes and what he does.
The whole thing about him organising the protest, that is in that El Pais report, which I hadn't seen till Mark posted it, but I don't think it's very accurate anyway for reasons explained above.
Usually when I put stuff up from Spain, I use more or less these rules:
If there's a direct account from someone who is there, translate it as directly as I can, and try and make it very accurate
If it's a newspaper story, just pick out interesting facts, they can pay their own translators, I'm not a free translation service for the bourgeois press
I don't usually put much background or analysis I just report the action. If you think I'm not reporting accurately then say how you want it done differently.

fingers malone

11 years 10 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by fingers malone on August 10, 2012

Getting back to the actual point, my flatmate just said that they have arrested five people for "robo con coaccion" something like "robbery with menaces" or "robbery with force" we are trying to get local news on the internet but we can't do it.

Caiman del Barrio

11 years 10 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by Caiman del Barrio on August 10, 2012

3 arrests mentioned here: http://ecijaweb.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=2600:un-tercer-sindicalista-del-sat-detenido-por-su-implicacion-en-el-asalto-del-mercadona-de-ecija-&catid=39:ecija&Itemid=296

Not to be harsh but it seems tragically inevitable. Deliberate martyrdom or intense naivete?

fingers malone

11 years 10 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by fingers malone on August 10, 2012

Dunno, maybe it's a bit ploughshares, they did mass shoplifting with union flags and no face coverings to make a point rather than so much to get the stuff, I'm not sure what to think really.

One of the demands is that supermarkets don't throw away the food at the end of the day, that they give it to the red cross before it goes out of date. There is a bit of a scandal as the supermarkets have just started putting padlock on the dustbins to stop people skipping and people are angry about it.

fingers malone

11 years 10 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by fingers malone on August 10, 2012

They took some of the food to the women squatting in La Corrala, that's nice.

wojtek

11 years 10 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by wojtek on August 10, 2012

fingers, thanks for your further posts. When I first saw the El Pais reports and their description (what I understand now to be their inflation) of Gordillo's influence I felt cheated tbh when comparing it to your article, but I do now think I was unfair on you. I'm not used to trade unions being so militant, so when I read words like 'direct action' and 'en masse' I conflated it with self-activity, soz.

MT

11 years 10 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by MT on August 10, 2012

direct action is an integral part of the "traditional" union movement, but i know what you mean. there's a lot of people who don't know what to think when the bad bad unions go into direct actions. which just says a lot about not knowing how traditional unions work. or the other thing they do is uncritical support. that said, i don't know if any of this is your case (and to be honest, I don't care)

Mark.

11 years 10 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by Mark. on August 10, 2012

links in Spanish:

CNT Andalucía statement in support of the SAT action

CGT Andalucía have also given their support

Los sindicatos CGT y CNT en Andalucía han trasladado públicamente este viernes su apoyo al Sindicato Andaluz de Trabajadores (SAT) por los asaltos a dos supermercados andaluces que organizó este pasado martes en Écija (Sevilla) y Arcos de la Frontera (Cádiz), a la vez que se han solidarizado con las personas que han sido detenidas por su presunta participación en estos hechos.

En sendos comunicados, ambas organizaciones justifican estas actuaciones, que la CGT califica de "ilegal pero justa", y la CNT considera que ha tenido un "triple valor", ya que "ha roto el discurso hegemónico que trata de justificar que sean los pobres y trabajadores los que paguen los platos rotos de la crisis", ha puesto de manifiesto "la irracionalidad de un sistema económico en el que grandes compañías acumulan alimentos, incluso los destruyen, mientras a pocos metros existen cientos o miles de personas pasando necesidad", y demuestra que hay sindicatos "combativos" que "apuestan por la desobediencia".

fingers malone

11 years 10 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by fingers malone on August 13, 2012

[youtube]WPPibyP595w[/youtube]

Here's a video of the food being taken to La Corrala.

Butters

11 years 10 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by Butters on August 17, 2012

An article about the role of the SAT, the left, and the mass-media

Apologize for not having translated the article into english yet

Espectáculo del SAT y apoyo de la izquierda: la clase dominante en España, enfrentada a la crisis y al creciente descontento, trata de darle una capa de pintura a su desgastado aparato político y sindical

La crisis capitalista, en su paso por España, está haciendo que las contradicciones y antagonismos sociales que recorren la sociedad capitalista se muestren de una forma mucho más descarnada y clara, y que el Estado capitalista, tras su fachada democrática, aparezca de forma cada vez más evidente como lo que es: la máquina encargada de mantener las relaciones sociales y de producción capitalista que requiere la burguesía para su dominio sobre la población en general y sobre la clase proletaria en particular.

La situación se acerca a lo insostenible: aumento brutal de la pobreza y el hambre, paro masivo, miles de desahucios, aumento de la precariedad y la explotación, drásticas reducciones salariales, recortes o eliminación de servicios básicos (sanidad, educación, lucha contra incendios, etc).

En este contexto, la función principal de la mal llamada “clase política”, que no es otra que mentir, sembrar ilusiones y dar legitimidad “democrática” a la dominación capitalista, obviamente sufre un gran desgaste, por lo que es importante para la clase burguesa el preparar piezas de recambio, tanto en lo referente a los partidos e individuos que directamente asumen la función de gestión y aplicación de las medidas que el capital manda, como en los encargados de contener y canalizar el malestar social.

Y algo similar sucede con los sindicatos. Ante la gravedad de la situación, el capital y su Estado debe contar en la reserva con aparatos sindicales capaces de controlar y canalizar hacia puntos muertos las luchas y protestas cuando los “oficiales” CC.OO. , UGT u otros se muestren incapaces.

El caso es que el pasado 7 de agosto el SAT (Sindicato Andaluz de Trabajadores), previa llamada a los medios, organizó “asaltos” simbólicos a varios supermercados en la región andaluza “para denunciar la situación de miseria de muchas familias en Andalucía”. Los medios burgueses han situado estas acciones en portada durante varias días con dos objetivos, aparentemente contradictorios pero perfectamente complementarios: primero, el intento de criminalizar y asociar toda lucha y movilización con violencia hacia personas y trabajadores, utilizando de forma hipócrita y cínica las lágrimas de una cajera nerviosa a raíz de un pequeño rifi-rafe durante la acción, y así sembrar dudas en aquellos proletarios que sientan el impulso de lanzarse a la lucha en el futuro; y segundo, darle una inestimable publicidad al SAT, de paso a Izquierda Unida, y de forma general a toda la izquierda del capital.

Es bien conocida la férrea censura y blackout imperante en los medios “democráticos”: lo que no interesa a sus dueños es ocultado, o si es imposible por su amplitud, convenientemente tergiversado y manipulado. Desde luego las acciones simbólicas podrían haber sido, como tantas otras veces en casos similares, ocultadas o minimizadas por los medios; si no lo fueron es por las razones arriba señaladas. Y como decíamos, la publicidad al SAT y a IU ha sido enorme, con presencia de miembros del sindicato en múltiples platós televisivos (con la vedette y diputado andaluz por IU Sánchez Gordillo a la cabeza) soltando libremente todo su discurso, junto con sectores de IU que han tenido la oportunidad de mostrar su apoyo a la acción, con el respetable parlamentario Gaspar Llamazares como elemento mediático destacado, y así ponerse por un momento el disfraz de “combativos”.

Pero la cuestión fundamental que subyace de estos “eventos mediáticos” va más allá del SAT, o de tal o cual sigla o personaje; la clase dominante busca a corto y medio plazo el alimentar 3 elementos fundamentales para dificultar la reaparición histórica de la lucha de clase del proletariado a nivel masivo y mantener su poder: alimentar ilusiones sobre el parlamentarismo y las farsas electorales; fomentar la idea de que el sindicalismo (en sus distintas versiones, “oficial” o “de base”) sería una herramienta eficaz de protesta y lucha para los explotados; y espolvorear todo el arsenal de confusión con posiciones políticas y reivindicaciones reaccionarias y ajenas a la lucha proletaria.

La burguesía ha tratado de transmitir que, pese a todo, el parlamento representaría al pueblo, y que hay parlamentarios que sí se preocupan de “los ciudadanos” (su distinguida señoría Llamazares ha aprovechado bien la ocasión para hacerse la foto y se ha erigido en defensor de los pobres). En definitiva, que existiría alguna esperanza de lucha transformadora en el seno de ese cascarón vacío y podrido, lleno de cotorras mentirosas a sueldo del capital, sin otro fin que legitimar la dominación capitalista y alimentar ilusiones “democráticas” y electorales de cambio, que es el parlamento burgués.

De la misma forma, la clase dominante ha pretendido dar oxígeno al sindicalismo, y más concretamente al sindicalismo “de base” o “alternativo” (cuyas diferencias con el sindicalismo “oficial” serían más de forma que de fondo, siendo en general los “alternativos” meros apéndices críticos de los “oficiales”, como pudimos comprobar una vez más en la última “huelga general” del 29-M). ¿Los métodos de estos sindicatos “alternativos”?: acciones simbólicas para llamar la atención de los medios, marchas a pié, aislar y centrar los conflictos en una empresa o zona geográfica, acciones espectaculares (ocupaciones, bloqueos de carreteras, etc), movilizaciones a toque de corneta de los sindicatos grandes, suplicar en la puerta del político de turno, etc. Lejos de lo mínimo que la clase proletaria requiere hoy día: espacios de encuentro, solidaridad, reflexión y debate donde romper el aislamiento; la extensión de los conflictos y las protestas más allá de la empresa o área geográfica particular; el uso de las movilizaciones desmovilizadoras de los sindicatos “oficiales” para contactar y debatir con compañeros y no para ser una mera comparsa chillona.

A la vez, dándole publicidad al SAT, lo que la burguesía ha pretendido es difundir lo máximo posible el arsenal de confusionismo y posiciones reaccionarias que este sindicato comparte con la mayoría de la izquierda y extrema izquierda [1] (y con gran parte del aparato político e ideológico burgués). Este sindicato tiene sus propias peculiaridades ideológicas (entre las más reaccionarias estarían su extravagante nacionalismo andaluz, que identifica la solución a todos los problemas “de Andalucía” -así, en general- con su independencia de España; la caduca y estéril reivindicación de “reforma agraria” para el problema del paro jornalero en Andalucía, como si fuera un problema separado del conjunto del proletariado; o sus reivindicaciones especialmente humillantes y más propias de Cáritas como la de que los supermercados entreguen comida a punto de caducar a la gente necesitada...) pero, como decimos, estas son algunas posiciones de la izquierda en general que es necesario denunciar:

- La utilización del aparato político burgués (la “clase política”) como taparrabo del sistema al que culpar de la crisis (“malas políticas”, casos de corrupción, los sueldos y privilegios de los políticos, etc), y así no señalar al sistema capitalista como un todo, y al aparato político y su corrupción como expresión de este. Mientras la indignación se dirija y limite a los políticos la burguesía puede estar tranquila.

- La utilización de los bancos y el sector financiero también como chivos expiatorios “culpables de la crisis” como si estos no fueran organismos estrechamente ligados al Estado capitalista y al sistema como un todo, y como si el hundimiento del sector financiero no fuera otra cosa que la expresión del derrumbe de una parte de la economía capitalista. Vuelta a la vieja cantinela antiglobalización, hoy retomada por los restos del 15M y la izquierda de que “el poder financiero se está cargando la democracia” (¡!).

- La utilización de sus acciones dirigidas a “llamar la atención del gobierno” y evitar la “helenización de España”, y a que este “haga políticas a favor del pueblo”. Por supuesto sus acciones no van dirigidas al conjunto de explotados, a que el proletariado gane en fuerza, autoorganización, unidad, solidaridad y capacidad política para el combate contra la burguesía.

- Denuncia de que “Bruselas” y “Merkel” estarían acabando con “nuestra soberanía”, discurso que exime a la clase capitalista española (y andaluza) y a su sistema de toda culpa en los ataques a las condiciones de vida. Como se vé, el reaccionario y antiproletario nacionalismo andaluz (que reivindica para crear empleo, entre otras cosas, que no se lleven la industria a Cataluña...) es perfectamente compatible con el reaccionario y antiproletario nacionalismo español (que se esfuerza en señalar a “Alemania” y “Bruselas” como los ladrones de “nuestra soberanía”...).

- Soluciones mágicas para la crisis: que el BCE preste dinero barato (¡cuando precisamente el crédito excesivo para crear una demanda ficticia que diera salida a las mercancías ha sido la causa inmediata de la crisis!), que se hagan inversiones productivas, que se genere empleo, etc... Por lo visto aquí no hay lucha de clases, no hay antagonismos sociales, la burguesía y su Estado no mirarían por su propio beneficio sino por “el bien del pueblo”, no hay contradicciones en el sistema que lo llevan a crisis y convulsiones cada vez más profundas, sólo “buenas o malas políticas” en las que habría que acertar por el “bien del país”... ¿y la crisis?, sería mentira, “una estafa”.

La gravedad de la situación, los múltiples y sofisticados métodos y aparatos de confusión y canalización que posee la clase dominante y su Estado, la descomposición social y la atomización creciente, hacen absolutamente indispensable un mínimo de claridad política para luchar contra el capitalismo. No puede haber práctica revolucionaria sin teoría revolucionaria, sin conocer el terreno que pisamos, la portería que defendemos y en la que nos toca marcar, a nuestros enemigos y a nuestros falsos amigos.

Los compañeros que honestamente tratan de luchar contra este sistema bajo la influencia de la izquierda y la extrema izquierda del capital tienen que hacer un esfuerzo y reflexionar acerca de la actividad y discurso de esas organizaciones e ideologías, cuyo fin (más allá de los honestos y combativos militantes que pudiera haber en sus filas) en la sociedad burguesa es el de contener, canalizar y debilitar la capacidad, teórica y práctica, del proletariado para luchar contra el capitalismo.

Draba 16/08/2012

[1] Para ver un pequeño listado de colectivos e individuos de la izquierda que han dado su apoyo al SAT: http://www.kaosenlared.net/component/k2/item/27597-artistas-intelectuales-movimientos-sociales-sindicatos-y-partidos-se-solidarizan-con-el-sat.html

fingers malone

11 years 9 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by fingers malone on September 6, 2012

http://ccaa.elpais.com/ccaa/2012/09/05/catalunya/1346842661_039435.html

Here's another one, in Catalonia, two unemployed women took a trolley full of food from a supermarket, supported by Plataforma Afectados por la Hipoteca. (Platform for those affected by mortgages, do a lot of anti eviction stuff.) Food distributed amongst families with no income. She's in court now. Article is in Spanish but if you scroll down there is a short video of the action which is easy to understand.

wojtek

11 years 7 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by wojtek on November 1, 2012

Anyone have more (accurate?) information on this?
http://elpais.com/elpais/2012/10/31/inenglish/1351711668_656856.html

Mark.

11 years 7 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by Mark. on November 3, 2012

Not really. There's an alasbarricadas thread complaining about the TV coverage but I'm not sure what actually happened.

Edit: There's another alasbarricadas thread here which I'd missed and a google translation fwiw. It looks like this has brought a lot of bad publicity and embarrassment for the CGT and CNT. There may be legal problems as well but I'm not sure about this. I'm still not that clear about what happened but it appears that the CGT/CNT demo was joined by more sub-cultural anarchists who took it in a direction that wasn't originally intended, with some fairly stupid and counter-productive actions. These actions probably wouldn't have been such a big issue in themselves if they hadn't ended up being linked to the CGT and CNT. Apologies if any of this is inaccurate - any clarification would be welcome.