German Revolution 1918

The Significance of the German Revolution

Reflections on the CWO/ICT Public Meeting in London (November 17 2018).

A Hundred Years On: Lessons of the German Revolution

9 November is an auspicious date in the German historical calendar. 80 years ago this was the anniversary of Kristallnacht (the Night of Broken Glass) when synagogues were burned and 10,000 Jewish males were marched to concentration camps. It was the first step on the road to the genocide of millions. 28 years ago it was the day that the GDR authorities announced the dismantling of the Berlin Wall. However, a century ago it was also the date when the Kaiser announced his abdication in the face of a workers’ revolution which had begun with mutinies in Kiel before spreading across Germany.

The untold history of armistice and the end of World War I

‘The best antidote to ideology is detail,’ writes Paul Mason. And the detail that’s missing this Armistice Day is that working people, when they take power into their own hands, can end whatever catastrophe is imposed on them.

Lest We Forget: Workers Stopped Capitalism’s First World War

The 100th anniversary of the Armistice, which we are told put a stop to the first world war, happens to coincide with remembrance Sunday, or Poppy Day. So we’re in for a treat. On top of poppy-wearing – now almost de rigueur – and two minute silences in the most improbable places, there are some smashing events in store. While local volunteers polish up war memorials, craft red poppy memorabilia, there are all sorts of state-sponsored celebrations, to mark the 11th hour of the eleventh day, in November 1918 when “the guns fell silent”.

German Anarchist Communism from the 1890s to the 1930s: the AFD and the FKAD

A short history of German anarchist communism

Le Prolétaire – The Tragedy of the German Proletariat in the First Post-War Period

We present here in English the International Communist Party’s account and analysis of the struggles of revolutionary and counter-revolutionary forces in Germany in the first post war period, published in eight separate parts in 1972.

The KAPD and the proletarian movement – Jacques Camatte

A 1971 essay on the KAPD, its positive features (its break with the ideology and practice of social democracy) and its shortcomings (“ideology of the producers”), with discussions of, among other things: Lenin’s Infantile Disorder; the KAPD’s relations with the Third International; National Bolshevism; the AAU and AAUE; the KAPD as vanguard party; the counterrevolution, Stalinism and fascism; the crucial importance of Germany for the proletarian revolution; the KAPD’s influence on the communist currents of the 1960s; and the next, “human revolution” entailing the “abolition of the proletariat” (communism: “the mode of production in which the goal of production is man himself”).

Czego chce Związek Spartakusa? - Róża Luksemburg

Spartakusbund

Projekt programu Komunistycznej Partii Niemiec (Związku Spartakusa) napisany przez Różę Luksemburg. Jednogłośnie przyjęty i opublikowany w „Die Rote Fahne” (14 grudnia 1918 r.).

Aus der Werkstatt der deutschen Revolution - Emil Barth

Emil Barth

From the Workshop of the Revolution (pp. 158, Berlin, 1919). A person of world-historical importance, Emil Barth (1879–1941) was the leader of the revolutionary shop stewards (revolutionäre Obleute) and the Council of the People's Deputies' most radical member. Barth recounts his bitter experience, providing an unflattering picture of the German Revolution's (mis)leadership.

Manifesto of proletarian art

“Manifest Proletkunst” (Manifesto of Proletarian Art), a text written by the Dutch artist Theo van Doesburg, published in Kurt Schwitters' periodical Merz #2 in April 1923 (Hannover, p.24-25), with signatures by leading artists of the international avant-garde (Schwitters, Hans Arp, Tristan Tzara and Christof Spengemann).