Italy

Arditi del Popolo - The First Anti-Fascists

The rise to power of Mussolini and the Fascists in Italy, from 1919 to 1922, provides us with important lessons, not just about Fascism but also about the tactics & organisation necessary to fight it. Equally the critical role of the wider working class struggle is thrown into sharp focus. We believe the lessons are clear enough that they emerge simply from relating the story...

Article from Fighting Talk #14 (1996).

100 Years Since Livorno

In January 1921, more than three years after the October Revolution in Russia, some two years since the murder of Rosa Luxemburg and Karl Liebknecht in Berlin at the behest of the German Social Democratic Party, and in the aftermath of two wasted years of workers’ factory occupations in Italy itself, the intransigent revolutionaries in the Italian Socialist Party (PSI), led by Amadeo Bordiga, finally won the day and broke from the old party of compromise and accommodation with capital to form the Communist Party of Italy (PCd’I).

Wealth Tax: Expropriation of the Rich or Capitalist Smokescreen?

As the bourgeoisie wracks its brains for solutions to this epochal crisis, the tax lever has become one of the main tools that left reformists believe will end capitalist aggression and bring substantial benefits to the depleted pockets of the proletariat.

Thoughts on Francesco Ghezzi

Francesco Ghezzi was an anarchist militant from Milan who was also active in France, Switzerland, Germany and Russia (and was imprisoned in the last three countries).

Gramscism or Marxism?

The following is our foreword (with additional footnotes) to the book Gramsci between Marxism and Idealism by Onorato Damen, which we translated and published last year. The book is still available to order, but you can now download the PDF of it for free HERE.

They Call It Suicide, We Call It Murder - Black Flag

On 5 March 1998 the Italian police arrested 3 anarchists on serious charges of “subversive association for the purpose of constituting an armed gang”. They were accused of various actions linked to the popular struggle against the construction of the high speed railway through the Val di Susa in Piemonte. Now only one of the 3 arrested anarchists remains alive.

Article from Black Flag #215 1998.

The Murders of Fausto Atti and Mario Acquaviva

Under this cross fire of the Stalinists and the Blackshirts the red flag of revolution carried on flying, thanks to the extreme sacrifice of the internationalists of whom we remember first those who died at the hands of the Axis. But the two most significant deaths were not at the hands of the Nazis but the “centrists”, the new social democrats, as the Stalinists were labelled in those days.