Krisis Group

A critique of Anselm Jappe's essay, "Who Is To Blame?" - Roland Simon (Excerpt)

In this 2009 article, Roland Simon of Théorie Communiste subjects Anselm Jappe and, more generally, the current known as “Value Critique”, to severe criticism, claiming that their emphasis on the “commodity” and “value” causes them to misunderstand the Marxist critique of capitalism and to harbor erroneous views about “a kind of value that is no longer value” because of an alleged decline of the proportion of labor in each commodity caused by increasing productivity, and that their “‘focus’ on value and the commodity causes us to ‘forget’ that value is capital” and that the goal of capitalism is not even just surplus-value but rather the reproduction of capitalist class relations.

The Krisis Group: a mountain gives birth to a mouse – Charles Reeve

In this review essay written in 2003 for Le Monde Libertaire on the occasion of publication of the first French edition of the “Manifesto Against Labor”, Charles Reeve discusses the Krisis Group’s critique of capitalism and concludes that there is “nothing new under the sun” here, that the Krisis Group presents its critique of reformism as if it were a novel discovery when in fact it is the heritage of “the revolutionary currents of Marxism and anarchism”—which the Group does not bother to mention—and that its proposals to implement a “break with the categories of labor” are “neo-reformist” and not so different from the positions of the civil society movement it ridicules.

Parables of big brother - Robert Kurz

Robert Kurz discusses the “implicit” “subtexts” of the great dystopian literature of the 20th century and reveals the “internalized constraints” of “the anonymous, ‘reified’ character of [the] totalitarianism” of our time, in which “the Voice of Big Brother is the voice of the Anonymous World Market”, the “most totalitarian of all systems”, and “the subjective command centers are … the executive organs of an autonomized mechanism” ruled by “the irrational end-in-itself of the ‘interminable valorization of value’” whose “ideal is the self-surveillance and self-control of the individual entrepreneur ‘by way of his capitalist superego’”.

Work will not set you free - Notes on Günther Anders – Franz Schandl

An annotated synopsis of the views of Günther Anders on the question of “work” or “labor”, including numerous quotations from Anders published here in English for the first time (which the author claims “are undoubtedly among the most radical and best examples of the critique of labor that appeared during the 20th century”), along with many choice selections from his pithy observations regarding conformism, technology, “duty”, “the right to a job”, “the humanization of labor”, consumerism, television, sports, etc., which in many respects anticipate some of the ideas later advocated by Guy Debord and the situationists.

The crisis of abstract labor is the crisis of capitalism - Norbert Trenkle

Norbert Trenkle of the Krisis Group discusses the crisis of abstract labor in which “capitalism now only functions as a gigantic machine for exclusion and marginalization”, characterized by overaccumulation, the resort to fictitious capital in order to valorize capital and “the total diffusion of abstract labor throughout all of life”, resulting in “the brutalization of individual competition, the exacerbation of sexist and racist violence, the spread of nationalist and ethnic identity politics and the growth of religious sects and mafia gangs”, phenomena that “constitute extensions of the dominant, exclusionary and destructive effects of capitalist logic under crisis conditions”.

Interview on The Black Book of Capitalism - Robert Kurz

Robert Kurz discusses his book, The Black Book of Capitalism, which he describes as a "radical-critical history of modernization since the 18th century", summarizes his views on "class struggle" in the context of his critique of value and labor, refers to the "dominant order" as "an accumulation of infamies" and calls for a movement "that will directly appropriate resources and bypass the detour of the market, the State, money and politics".

Notes on the manifesto against labor - Jaime Semprun

Jaime Semprun criticizes the Krisis Group's Manifesto Against Labor for clinging to what he refers to as the "obsolete" idea that the existing productive forces of capitalist big industry can be re-appropriated for the purposes of revolutionary change, when such events as Hiroshima and Chernobyl clearly show that these forces have long since crossed the threshold that stands between "productive forces" and "destructive forces", and claims that the "machinery that has paralyzed" "humanity's vital forces" must be destroyed rather than re-appropriated.

Paradoxes of human rights - Robert Kurz

Analysis of the paradoxes of the concept of "human rights" under capitalism, which "objectively" defines human rights as a function of the individual's "solvency" or usefulness in capital's valorization process, and "subjectively" according to whether the individual is ideologically defined as a "friend" or an "enemy".

The fatal pressure of competition - Robert Kurz

2002 analysis of the phenomenon of school shootings, which the author claims reflect the totalitarian mass psychology of capitalism in crisis, whose perpetrators are described as "robots of capitalist competition gone haywire" in a "culture of self-destruction and self-forgetting".