Vietnam war

Monthly London Meetings: 'Social Histories of Revolution: the Long 1960s'

‘Social Histories of Revolution: the Long 1960s’ explores this period from the perspectives of those whose strikes, demonstrations and other forms of struggle shook the world.

John McCain – War Hero or Racist War Monger?

The publicity surrounding John McCain’s recent funeral was excessive to say the least, with wall-to-wall coverage in the United States and Britain, as well as other countries around the world. We were relentlessly informed in a slew of whitewashed obituaries, cringe-worthy plaudits and declarations of love from the bourgeoisie on both sides of the Atlantic for more than a week, in newspapers, online and on television, what a heroic champion of freedom, democracy, civil rights and free speech this man was; as well as being above all a great patriot.

My God They're Killing Us - The Kent State University Shootings

An account of the shooting of students at Kent State University by the National Guard in an attempt to end anti war protests on the campus. Four students were killed with ten more wounded, one of which was paralysed.

Kent State Shooting Protest Posters

Posters relating to the murder of four Kent State students by national guardsman at an anti-war protest on May 4, 1970. Another 30 students were wounded, one of whom was paralyzed for life after the troops opened fire on the large crowd of youths on the campus.

When Chomsky Worked on Weapons Systems for the Pentagon - by Chris Knight

MITRE's first command and control project: the SAGE air defense system for nucle

Between 1963 and 1965, Noam Chomsky worked as a consultant on an Air Force project to establish English as an “operational language for command and control.”[1] According to one of his students, who also worked on this project, the military justification for funding this work was “that in the event of a nuclear war, the generals would be underground with some computers trying to manage things, and that it would probably be easier to teach computers to understand English than to teach the generals to program.”[2]

The Jackson State shootings, 1970

Jackson State women's dormitory window

A short account of the shooting of several black students and bystanders by police on the night of May 14/15, 1970.

Readings and photos from the student uprising at Chomsky’s university, MIT, 1967-1972

1969 student protest at Chomsky's university, MIT

The protests that erupted at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the late 1960s were an important part of the student unrest that shook the US in this period.

Noam Chomsky has talked sympathetically about these protests, which focused on MIT's development of both nuclear weapons and weapons used in the Vietnam war. However, Chomsky also has a strong loyalty to MIT – at one point describing the university as ‘the freest and the most honest and has the best relations between faculty and students than any other ... [with] a good record on civil liberties’ – and it seems this loyalty has prevented him from giving a full account of these events.

Chomsky at MIT: Between the war scientists and the anti-war students, by Chris Knight

Noam Chomsky and police confronting students at MIT, November 1969

It is now fifty years since Noam Chomsky published his celebrated article, 'The Responsibility of Intellectuals'.* Few other writings had a greater impact on the turbulent political atmosphere on US campuses in the 1960s. The essay launched Chomsky's political career as the world's most intransigent and cogent critic of US foreign policy - a position he has held to this day.

Chomsky on War Research at MIT

Noam Chomsky's 'The Responsibility of Intellectuals', 50 years on, UCL 25/2/17

On 25 February 2017, a conference was held at University College London to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Noam Chomsky's landmark article, 'The Responsibility of Intellectuals'.[1]

During the conference, Noam made the following statement about the military research that was going on at his university, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, around the time when the article was published:

The last mutineer

Clyde McKay, left, and Alvin Glatkowski, in front of the prison ship

Article by Richard Linnett and Roberto Loiederman about the spectacular mutiny on the USS Columbia Eagle and what befell the mutineers afterwards. Two of the crew hijacked the ship, which was transporting napalm to drop on Vietnam, and sailed it to Cambodia.