Demanding the impossible?: Human nature and politics in nineteenth-century social anarchism

Demanding the impossible?: Human nature and politics in nineteenth-century social anarchism

David Morland's text examining the relationship between anarchism's notion of human nature and its vision of a future stateless society by way of three 19th-century social anarchists: Proudhon, Bakunin and Kropotkin.

It demonstrates that social anarchism operates a conception of human nature that assumes the existence of both egoism and sociability, and therefore provides a realistic assessment of human nature. The book concludes by exploring the possibilities for a reconceptualization of the anarchist conception of human nature that would help overcome the problems identified by the author and point the way for future development of anarchist thought.

AttachmentSize
Demanding the impossible Human nature and politics in nineteenth-century social anarchism.pdf41.76 MB