Martin Glaberman

Unions and black liberation - Martin Glaberman

A critical review by Martin Glaberman of the book, The Negro and the American Labor Movement. Originally appeared in Radical America (September-October 1968)

Martin Luther King, Jr

A short article by Martin Glaberman about MLK's legacy of nonviolent tactics.

Voices from the rank and file: remembering Marty Glaberman and Stan Weir

a month before oakland general strike

Staughton Lynd remembers two socialists who wrote extensively about life on the job and struggles at work, Martin Glaberman and Stan Weir.

Wartime strikes: The struggle against the no-strike pledge in the UAW during World War II - Martin Glaberman

Martin Glaberman's examination of American car industry workers wildcat strike wave, despite their own union's no strike pledge, during World War 2.

The Left in the Detroit Labour Movement - Martin Glaberman

Martin Glaberman reviews - and contests the accuracy and honesty of - two books on the Detroit union movement.

Rediscovering Two Labor Intellectuals - Steve Early

Steve Early reviews collections of writings by Martin Glaberman and Stain Weir, while tying their experience and outlook to the emerging split within the AFL-CIO in 2004.

The Dodge Revolutionary Union Movement - Martin Glaberman

Martin Glaberman's analysis on the formation of the Dodge Revolutionary Union Movement, a radical organisation of black car factory workers who placed themselves in opposition to both their bosses and the union.

Ghetto riots in the USA - Martin Glaberman

Short article by Martin Glaberman focusing on the riots in Watts, Los Angeles, in 1965.

“Be his payment high or low”: the American working class in the sixties - Martin Glaberman

United Auto Workers union leader, Walter Reuther.

Martin Glaberman's analysis of workers' struggle in America in the 1960s and the conflicts which workers found themselves in with their unions.

The American worker - Paul Romano and Ria Stone

General Motors workers assemble an engine

An extensive two-part article on factory workers in the US in 1947. In the first half, auto worker Phil Singer (using the pen name, Paul Romano) vividly describes factory life, and in the second, Grace Lee Boggs (using the pseudonym, Ria Stone) outlines a Marxist analysis.