Russian Revolution 1917

Anarchy #02

Second issue from the Second Series of Anarchy, published in March 1971 and focusses on the Kronstadt Revolt, Russian Anarchism and the Bolsheviks.

Socialism from Below: A History of Anarchism

A short history of Anarchism both as a philosophy and as a movement, written during World War II.

Bogatsky, Genrikh Markovich (1889-after 1923?} aka Heinrich Bogatzki

Members of Petrograd  Military  Revolutionary Committee

A short biography of Russian anarchist Genrikh Bogatsky

Down with the Death Penalty - Julius Martov

Julius Martov's denunciations of Bolsheviks use of capital punishment in contrast to their earlier campaigns against the death penalty when they were in opposition.

Ettore Cinnella - The tragedy of the Russian Revolution: promise and default of the Left Socialist Revolutionaries in 1918.

Left SR leader Maria Spiridonova (center, wearing glasses).

The unpublished minutes of the three congresses held by the Left Socialist Revolutionaries (PLSR) in 1918 are the main source of this article. Its starting point is the crisis the old Socialist Revolutionary Party (PSR) suffered during the fall of 1917 and the rise of the Left SRs.

Notes on Soviet Attitudes to Homosexuality

Fragments of information concerning the attitudes of the Bolshevik government in its early years to homosexuality.

Theses on Bolshevism - Rudolf Sprenger

Rudolf Sprenger's 1934 critique of the Bolsheviks and their role in the 1917 Russian Revolution, arguing they were ultimately a movement of bourgeois revolution in a predominantly peasant country and therefore not only unserviceable as a revolutionary practice for the international working class, but also one of its heaviest and most dangerous impediments.

Work, Discipline, and Order to Save the Socialist Soviet Republic

Trotsky's March 28th 1918 address to the City Conference of the Russian Communist Party in Moscow. Trotsky calls for professional management of factories by technicians, shaming of slacking workers in Soviet publications, compulsory military training in factories and schools, and for Tsarist officers to be restored to the Red Army, ending the process of elections.

How We Should Reorganise the Workers' and Peasants' Inspection

In one of Lenin's final works, he describes the Bolshevik state apparatus as "to a considerable extent a survival of the past [which] has undergone hardly any serious change. It has only been slightly touched up on the surface, but in all other respects it is a most typical relic of our old state machine."