Politics journal

Dwight Macdonald and the politics Circle
Dwight Macdonald and the politics Circle

Politics was a radical journal edited by Dwight Macdonald from 1944 to 1949. The journal published political and cultural criticism of current events in the 1940s, and had many noteworthy contributors and thought-provoking essays.

Submitted by Ross Arctor on April 21, 2014

For more information on politics in particular, see Dwight Macdonald and the politics Circle: The Challenge of Cosmopolitan Democracy, by Gregory Sumner. For more information on Dwight Macdonald generally, see his biography, A Rebel in Defense of Tradition: The Life and Politics of Dwight Macdonald, by Michael Wreszin.

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syndicalist

3 months 2 weeks ago

Submitted by syndicalist on February 4, 2024

Wow. Just came across this. Dwight Macdonald was well respected here in NYC area by many radicals and anarcho-syndicalists. Tragic death.

1944

Submitted by Ross Arctor on April 21, 2014

Politics (February 1944)

Submitted by Ross Arctor on April 21, 2014

Contents
Cover (page 1)
Comment (pp. 1-5)
Macdonald, Dwight. Why "POLITICS"? (pp. 6-8)
Coser, Lewis (Louis Clair). Stalin's policy in Europe (pp. 8-9)
Lasky, Melvin J.. "The Breadline and the Movies" (pp. 9-10)
Oakes, J. Walter. permanent Toward a War Economy? (pp. 11-17)
Goodman, Paul. The attempt to invent an American style (pp. 17-18)
Mead, William. The Montreal Police strike (p. 18)
The American Scene. A letter from Petersburg, Va.. (pp. 19-20)
Macdonald, Dwight. Popular Culture. A theory of "Popular Culture" (pp. 20-23)
Lynn, Conrad. Free and Equal. Original Brief in the Case Lynn (pp. 23-26)
Greenberg, Clement. Books. Napoleon III: an interpretation (p. 27)
Coser, Lewis (Louis Clair.) Books. Reflections on the Revolution of Our Time (pp. 27-28)
Mills, C. Wright. Books. Socialism and Ethics (p. 28)
Chase, Richard V.. Books. Our age of unreason (p. 28)
Symes, Lillian. Books. American political parties, their natural history (pp. 28-29)
Dirlam, Joel B.. Books. The financing of large corporations, 1920-1939 (p. 29)
Moore, Ely. Books. Union rights and union duties; Democracy in Trade Unions, to survey, with a program of action (pp. 29-30)
Periodicals. "Rousseau and totalitarianism" (p. 30)
Periodicals. Behavior in extreme situations; Problems of Interment Camps (p. 30)
Periodicals. "The Moral Front" (p. 30)
Periodicals. "The regimented economy and the future of Socialism" (pp. 30-31)
Periodicals. "The chinese draft constitution" (p. 31)
Periodicals. Negroes in a war industry: The case of shipbuilding; The black car worker (p. 31)
Periodicals. "The german people and the postwar world" (p. 31)
Periodicals. "Labor in the war - and after" (p. 31)
Notes on contributors (p. 32)

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Politics (March 1944)

Submitted by Ross Arctor on April 21, 2014

Cover (p. 33)
Macdonald, Dwight. Comment (pp. 33-37)
Bell, Daniel. coming to The tragedy of American labor (pp. 37-42)
Freidel, Frank. The new imperialism, I: the haitian pilot-plant (pp. 43-45)
Mayer, Milton. How to win the war (pp. 45-46)
Macdonald, Dwight. The revival of "political economy" (pp. 46-48)
Meyer, Peter. The Soviet Union: a new class society (pp. 48-55)
Melville, Herman. Modern texts. What Redburn Saw in Launcelott's-Hey (pp. 56-57)
Stampp, Kenneth M.. Free and Equal. Our historians on slavery (pp. 58-59)
Bazelon, David T.. Free and Equal. The Harlem riot: a study in mass frustration (p. 59)
Free and Equal. "The truth about the Detroit riot" (p. 59)
Free and Equal. "Jazz and Its forerunners as an example of acculturation" (p. 59)
Bazelon, David T.. Books. What to do with Germany (pp. 59-60)
Coser, Lewis (Louis Clair.) Books. The American senate and world peace (p. 60)
Macdonald, Dwight. Books. The new course; The struggle for the new course (p. 61)
Macdonald, Dwight. Books. How to think about war and peace (p. 61)
Denton, John Henry. Books. The conscientious objector and the law (p. 61)
Goodman, Paul. Books. Liberal education (p. 62)
The intelligence office (pp. 62-63)
Greenberg, Clement. The intelligence office. Russia and european progress (pp. 63-64)
Coser, Lewis (Louis Clair.) The intelligence office. Russia and european progress (p. 64)
Notes on contributors (p. 64)

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Politics (April 1944)

Submitted by Ross Arctor on April 21, 2014

Contents

Cover (p. 65)
Comment. The MCF - A new Third Party? (pp. 65-68)
Mills, C. Wright. The powerless people: the role of the intellectual in society (pp. 68-72)
Tucci, Nicholas. The Cause that refreshes - Four delicious freedoms (pp. 73-74)
Pincus, Arthur. The new imperialism in Latin America: Twenty and One (pp. 74-80)
Marquart, Frank. A letter on the Michigan Third Party conference (pp. 80-81)
Meyer, Peter. The Soviet Union: a new class society (part two) (pp. 81-85)
Kees, Weldon. A brief introduction to the history of cultures (p. 85)
Macdonald, Dwight. Free and Equal. On the conduct of the Lynn Case (pages 85-88)
Hays, Arthur Garfield. Free and Equal. On the conduct of the Lynn Case. Rejoinder by mr. Hays (p. 88)
Fischer, Ruth. Popular Culture. Bert Brecht, minstrel of the GPU (pp. 88-89)
Serge, Victor. Books. War diary (p. 90)
Chase, Richard V.. Books. As the measure (pp. 90-91)
Macdonald, Dwight. Books. A history of economic thought (p. 91)
Lichtenstein, Stanley. Books. As we go marching (pp. 91-92)
Periodicals. "The evolutionist revolt against classical economics: (i) In France - Condorcet, Saint-Simon, Simonde de Sismondi, (2) In England - James Steuart, Richard Jones, Karl Marx" (p. 92)
Periodicals. "Man of His century: A reconsideration of the historical significance of Karl Marx" (p. 93)
Periodicals. "Is China's economy to be modeled on Japan's?" (p. 93)
Periodicals. "Britain's postwar trade and world economy"; "Planning industry's future in Britain (p. 93)
Periodicals. "From Moscow to Naples"; "'Liberated' Italy" (p. 93)
Periodicals. "Why war workers strike - the case history of a shipyard 'wildcat'" (pp. 93-94)
The intelligence office (pp. 94-96)
Contributors (p. 96)

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Politics (May 1944)

Submitted by Ross Arctor on April 21, 2014

Contents

Cover (p. 97)
Comment. Three Worlds (pages 97-102)
List, Kurt. The music of Soviet Russia (pp. 103-108)
Kristol, Irving. Koestler: a note on confusion (pp. 108-109)
Macdonald, Dwight. "The only really moral people" (pp. 109-110)
Gould, Joe. What to do with Europe (p. 111)
Bell, Daniel. The world of Moloch (pp. 111-113)
Padmore, George. The new imperialism, III: The Anglo-American condominium (pp. 113-116)
List, Kurt. Shostakovitch's Eight Symphony (p. 116)
Kees, Weldon. Rates. Cartoon cavalcade (pp. 116-117)
Bazelon, David T.. Rates. Comics and their Creators (pages 117-118)
Macdonald, Dwight. Rates. "The conquest of Europe on the screen: the Nazi newsreel, 1939-1940" (p. 118)
Modern Texts. The Melian Conference (from Thucydides' "History of the Peloponnesian War" Chapter XVII) (pp. 119-121)
Kerr, Wilfred H.. Free and Equal. Negro leaders and the Harlem riot (pp. 121-122)
Wilkins, Roy. Free and Equal. Reply (pp. 122-123)
Wood, Laura. Books. The Complete Jefferson, containing His major writings, published and unpublished, except His letters (pp. 123-124)
Oakes, J. Walter. Books. Capitalism, Socialism and Democracy (pp. 124-125)
Hesseltine, William B.. Books. The American story of industrial and labor relations (p. 125)
Macdonald, Dwight. Books. Ominpotent government: the rise of the total state and total war (pp. 125-126)
Mitchell, Broadus. The intelligence office. On "The coming tragedy of American labor" (p. 126)
Fischer, Ben. The intelligence office. On "The coming tragedy of American labor" (pp. 126-127)
Herman, Thelma. The intelligence office. Intellectuals and bureaucracy (p. 127)
Coser, Lewis (Louis Clair.) The intelligence office. Classical Vs. marxist economics (p. 128)
Notes on contributors (p. 128)

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Politics (June 1944)

Submitted by Ross Arctor on April 21, 2014

Contents

Cover (p. 129)
Comment. The shape of things to come (pp. 129-133)
Fey, Isabella. Odin (p. 133)
Chiaromontes, Nicholas. Croce and italian Liberalism (pp. 134-137)
McNatt, G. Isaac. "I was a Seabee" (pp. 137-140)
(Bombardier.) The story of the 477th Bombardment Group (pages 141-142)
Meyer, Peter. Mr. Joseph Stalin's revolution in economic science (pp. 143-144)
Macdonald, Dwight. Our golden age (pp. 144-146)
Serge, Victor. revolution at The dead-end (1926-1928) (pp. 147-151)
Periodicals. "The 1942 congressional elections" (pages 151-152)
Periodicals. "Facts for a candid world" (p. 152)
Periodicals. "'Rationality' in conduct: Wallas and Pareto" (p. 152)
Periodicals. "Sex roles in postwar planning" (pp. 152-153)
Coser, Lewis (Louis Clair.) Books. The tragedy of european labor 1918-1939 (pp. 153-154)
Freidel, Frank. Books. The revolutionary generation; Origins of the American Revolution (pp. 154-155)
Macdonald, Nancy. Books. War and children (p. 155)
Macdonald, Dwight. Books. Excess profits taxation (pp. 155-156)
Mattick, Paul. Books. Karl Marx and Marxian science (p. 156)
Kristol, Irving. Books. Dangling Man (p. 156)
The intelligence office (pp. 158-160)
Contributors (p. 160)

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Politics (July 1944)

Submitted by Ross Arctor on April 21, 2014

Contents

Cover (p. 161)
Comment. Allied policy in Europe (pp. 161-167)
De Angelis, J. Gabriel. Brewster The Shut-Down (pages 167-169)
Bloch, Werner; Coser, Lewis (Louis Clair.) Under the Lid (pp. 169-170)
Tucci, Nicholas. tyrants of The War (pages 170-172)
Bazelon, David T.. ashes Green (pp. 172-177)
Calhoun, Don. The political relevance of conscientious objection; with a rejoinder by the Editor (pages 177-180)
Schuyler, George S.. Free and Equal. An American dilemma. The Negro problem and modern democracy (pp. 181-182)
Stampp, Kenneth M.. Rates. George Fitzhugh: propagandist of the old South; Henry W. Grady: spokesman of the new South (pages 182-183)
Wood, Laura. Rates. Caribbean laboratory; A note on the repeal of the Chinese Exclusion Act (p. 183)
Macdonald, Dwight. How "practical" is a racially segregated Army? (pp. 184-186)
Gould, Joe. Books. A guide for the bedevilled (p. 186)
Oakes, J. Walter. Books. Mobilization for abundance (p. 186)
Douglas, George. Books. The Republic (pp. 186-187)
Macdonald, Dwight. Books. Production, jobs and taxes (p. 188)
Coser, Lewis (Louis Clair.) Books. A short history of Russia (pages 188-189)
The intelligence office (pp. 189-192)
Orlansky, Harold. The intelligence office. "Hoodlums" and Pharisees (pp. 189-190)
Tillich, Paul. The intelligence office. Some answers from a committee (pages 190-191)
Contributors (p. 192)

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Politics (August 1944)

Submitted by Ross Arctor on April 21, 2014

Contents

Cover (p. 193)
Comment. Some reflections on what is laughingly called "National Politics" (pp. 194-198)
News-Story-of-the-Year (p. 196)
Bettelheim, Bruno. Behavior in extreme situations (pp. 199-209)
Duncan, Robert. The homosexual in society (pp. 209-211)
(Blanqui). Mr. Moscowitz comes to St. Perkingrad (pp. 211-212)
Kerr, Wilfred H.. Negroism: strange fruit of segregation (pp. 212-217)
Zolotow, Maurice. Popular Culture. On highbrow writing (pp. 217-218)
Macdonald, Dwight. Popular Culture. On lowbrow thinking (pp. 219-220)
Lerner, Abba P.. Books. Labor and management in the Soviet Union (pp. 220-221)
The intelligence office (pp. 221-223)
Acland, Richard. The intelligence office. Commonwealth - London to Michigan writes (p. 222)
Serge, Victor. The intelligence office. "The end of Europe" (pp. 222-223)
Marquart, Frank. The intelligence office. Labor action at the shop level (pp. 223-224)
Contributors (p. 224)

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Politics (September 1944)

Submitted by Ross Arctor on April 21, 2014

Contents

Cover (p. 225)
Coser, Lewis (Louis Clair.) The France of tomorrow: what the french underground wants (pp. 225-232)
(Pfc). Italians and Fascism: Testimony & Comment (pp. 232-233)
Chiaromontes, Nicholas. Italians and Fascism: Testimony & Comment (pp. 233-234)
Fischer, Ruth. The life and death of Max Hoelz (pp. 234-238)
Lieutenant JL. Soldiers' Poetry Department (p. 238)
Macdonald, Dwight. War as an institution (I). Notes on the psychology of killing (pp. 239-243)
Bazelon, David T.. Popular Culture. More by Corwin - 16 Radio Dramas (pages 243-244)
Sher, S.. Popular Culture. In defense of Shostakovich (pp. 244-245)
Elliott, P. George. "Where are you going?" said reader to writer (pp. 245-247)
Macdonald, Dwight. "Here lies our road!" said writer to reader (pp. 247-251)
Wood, Laura. Books. A history of deeds done beyond the sea (pp. 251-252)
Freidel, Frank. Books. The French Right and Nazi Germany 1933-39. A study of public opinion (p. 252)
Macdonald, Dwight. Books. How Nazi Germany Has Controlled Business (p. 253)
Macdonald, Dwight. The intelligence office. Question period (pp. 253-254)
The intelligence office (pp. 254-256)
Contributors (p. 256)

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Politics (October 1944)

Submitted by Ross Arctor on April 21, 2014

Contents

Cover (p. 257)
Warsaw (pp. 257-259)
Comment (pp. 260-265)
Woodcock, George. The tyranny of the clock (pages 265-267)
Brown, John J.. American technology: myth vs. reality (pp. 267-270)
Weber, Max Class, Status, Party (pp. 271-278)
Macdonald, Dwight. Thomas for President? (pp. 278-281)
Contributors (p. 281)
Lemann, Bernard. War as an institution (II). The esthetics of bombing (pp. 282-285)
Free and Equal. The strike Tucson (p. 285)
The intelligence office (pp. 286-288)
Calhoun, Don. The intelligence office. Conscientious objection again (p. 287)

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Politics (November 1944)

Submitted by Ross Arctor on April 21, 2014

Contents

Cover (p. 289)
Macdonald, Dwight. "Dual Power" in France (pp. 290-294)
Comment (pp. 294-296)
Comment. Warsaw (2) (pp. 297-298)
Comment. The advantages of a political education (p. 298)
Comment. Why Herr Commandant is smiling (see cover) (p. 298)
Oakes, J. Walter. Reconversion - to what? (pp. 299-303)
Tucci, Nicholas. Commonnnonsense (pp. 304-305)
Glazer, Nathan; Hoffman, Frederick. Behind the Philadelphia strike (pp. 306-308)
Coser, Lewis (Louis Clair). European newsreel (pp. 308-310)
Orwell, George. The ethics of the detective story - From Raffles to Miss Blandish (pp. 310-315)
Smith, Robert Paul. Uncle PM (p. 315)
(Eyewitness). The American Scene. CAP - A worm's eye view (p. 316)
Contributors (p. 316)
Kerr, Wilfred H.. The intelligence office. Randolph and "negroism" (p. 317)
Bek-Gran, Robert. The intelligence office. 5 keys to Europe (p. 317)
Goodman, Paul. The intelligence office. The unalienated intellectual (pp. 318-319)
Macdonald, Dwight. The intelligence office. "Thomas for President?" reply to M. Lewis (pp. 319-320)

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Politics (December 1944)

Submitted by Ross Arctor on April 21, 2014

Contents

Cover (p. 321)
'Twas a famous victory (pp. 321-323)
Comment (pp. 323-327)
Comment. Warsaw (3) (pp. 327-328)
Queener, Llewellyn. War as an institution (III). Inter-enemy ethics (pp. 329-334)
Goodman, Paul. Popular Culture. Notes on Neo-Functionalism (pp. 335-337)
Coser, Lewis (Louis Clair). European newsreel (pp. 337-340)
Contributors (p. 340)
Taylor, William Palmer. know what? Some reactions to current criticism of Russia (pages 340-342)
Macdonald, Dwight. Just this - a rejoinder (pp. 342-344)
Roberts, H.. Free and Equal. "Negroism" ounces blackberries (pp. 344-345)
Kerr, Wilfred H.. Free and Equal. "Negroism" ounces blackberries (pp. 345-346)
Periodicals. "Industrialization and agriculture in India" (p. 346)
Periodicals. "Retail sales and consumer income" (pp. 346-347)
Periodicals. "Wartime construction and planet expansion" (p. 347)
Periodicals. "Group violence: a preliminary study of the attitudinal pattern of Its acceptance and rejection - a study of the 1943 Harlem riot" (p. 347)
Periodicals. "Politics and Ethics" (pp. 347-348)
Periodicals. "The Man from Missouri" (p. 348)
Orlansky, Harold. Books. The journey home (pp. 348-350)
The intelligence office (pp. 350-351)
Farrell, James T.. The intelligence office. James T. Farrell and the SWP (pp. 351-352)

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1945

Submitted by Ross Arctor on April 23, 2014

Politics (January 1945)

Submitted by Ross Arctor on April 23, 2014

Contents:

Cover (page 1)
Contributors (page 2)
Greece (pp. 2-8)
Tucci, Nicholas. Commonnonsense (pp. 8-9)
French, Martin (Gallicus.) The liberals' "indispensable man": Hitler (pp. 10-13)
"It is up to you, gentlemen!" (p. 14)
A Nazi meets with CO. (p. 14)
Savage, DS. Socialism in extremis (pp. 15-18)
The American Scene. The Albany story (pp. 18-21)
Coser, Lewis (Louis Clair). European newsreel (pp. 21-23)
Macdonald, Dwight. The Jews, "The New Leader", an old Judge Hull (pp. 23-25)
Chiaromontes, Nicholas. Books. Social law, after Proudhon (pp. 25-28)
Bettelheim, Bruno. Books. Diagnosis of Our Time (pp. 28-29)
MacLow, Jackson. Books. The Good Soldier Schweik (pp. 29-30)
The intelligence office. "Where are you going?" - Further Top comments (pp. 30-31)
The intelligence office (pp. 31-32)

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Politics (February 1945)

Submitted by Ross Arctor on April 23, 2014

Contents:
Cover (p. 33)
Macdonald, Dwight. Wallace & the labor draft (pp. 34-37)
The greek tragedy (2) (pp. 38-42)
Tucci, Nicholas. Uncle Sam's uncle (pp. 42-43)
Schapiro, Meyer. A note on Max Weber's politics (pp. 44-48)
Calhoun, Arthur W.. well socialized Can american politics? (pp. 48-50)
Weil, Simone. War as an institution (4). Reflections on war (pp. 51-55)
(Candide). A note on Simone Weil (pp. 55-56)
Coser, Lewis (Louis Clair). European newsreel. Retreat in France (pp. 56-57)
Oakes, J. Walter. "The manpower shortage fraud" (pp. 57-58)
Macdonald, Dwight. Eastmania (pp. 58-60)
Bazelon, David T.. Periodicals. "Race-thinking before racism" (pp. 60-61)
Berryman, John. Popular Culture. A plug for America (p. 61)
Serge, Victor. The intelligence office. Stalinism and the Resistance (pages 61-62)
Steig, Arthur. The intelligence office. "Inter-enemy ethics" (pp. 62-63)
Queener, Llewellyn. The intelligence office. "Inter-enemy ethics" (p. 63)
Taylor, William Palmer. The intelligence office. The russian question - rebuttal (pp. 63-64)
Contributors (p. 64)

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Reflections on War - Simone Weil

Photograph of Simone Weil

An essay by Simone Weil analysing war in its modern form and its relation to the struggle of the working class toward emancipation. First published in the November 1933 issue of ‘La Critique Sociale’; this English translation was published in the February 1945 issue of 'Politics'.

Author
Submitted by albatross on February 18, 2023

War is once more a problem on the order of the day. We live in constant expectation of it. The danger is perhaps imaginary, but the fear is real and is itself a factor of importance. The only word for it is “panic", not so much the dread of physical massacre as psychological anxiety before the problems posed by modern warfare.

Nowhere is this anxious bewilderment more marked than in the workingclass movement. Unless we make a serious attempt at analysis, we run the risk, sooner or later, of finding ourselves powerless not only to act but even to understand. The first step is to draw up a balance sheet of the traditional theories that have guided us up to now.

Up to the period following the last war, the revolutionary movement, in its various forms, had nothing in common with pacifism . The revolutionary stand on war and peace has always found its inspiration in the memories of the years 1792-3-4, the cradle of the revolutionary trends of the 19th century. In absolute contradiction with historic reality, the war of 1793 appeared as a victorious outburst, which, by ranging the French people against all foreign tyrants, was going to break with the same blow the domination of the Court and the upper bourgeoisie and hand over the power of the representatives of the laboring masses. From this legendary belief, perpetuated by the song Marseillaise, flows the conception that a revolutionary war, defensive or offensive, is not only a legitimate form but one of the most glorious forms of the struggle of the toiling masses against their oppressors. This idea appeared to be common to all Marxists and almost all revolutionaries up to about fifteen years ago. When it comes to other types of wars however, the socialist tradition offers not one but several contradictory theories, which have never been clearly compared with each other.

In the first half of the 19th century, war seems to have had a certain prestige in the eyes of the revolutionaries. In France, for example, they vigorously rebuked Louis-Philippe for his peace policy. Proudhon wrote an eloquent eulogy of war. The revolutionaries of the period dreamed not only of insurrections but of war waged in order to liberate oppressed peoples. The war of 1870 forced the proletarian organizations—that is to say, the International—to take, for the first time, a definite stand on the question of war. By Marx’s pen, the International invited the workers of the two combatant countries to show opposition against any attempt at conquest, but it also advised them to participate resolutely in the defence of their country in opposition to any attacking foreign adversary.

It was in behalf of another idea that Engels, in 1892, evoked the memories of a war of exactly one hundred years before when he called on the German social-democrats to fight with all their might in the case of a war of Germany against allied France and Russia. According to him, the matter was no longer one of defence or attack. It was now a question of preserving, either by an offensive or by defence, the country where the working class movement was most powerful. It was a question of crushing the country that was most reactionary. According to this outlook (and it was also that of Plekhanov, Mehring and others) the stand to be taken in a war could be determined by calculating what result would be most favorable to the international proletariat. Sides were to be taken accordingly.

Diametrically opposed to this position was that taken by the Bolshevists and the Spartacists: that in all wars—Lenin excepted revolutionary wars and wars of national defense, Rosa Luxemburg excepted revolutionary wars only—each workingclass should will the defeat of its own country and should sabotage the war effort. But these positions, based on the notion that all wars (save the mentioned exceptions) are imperialist in character and may be compared with quarrels of bandits over the division of their booty, also have their difficulties. For they seem to break the unity of action of the international proletariat by engaging the workers of each country to work for the defeat of their own country and favor at the same time the victory of the imperialist enemy, which, on the other hand, the workers in the opponent country must endeavor to prevent.

Liebnecht’s famous formula: “The main enemy is at home,” clearly brings out the chief difficulty when it assigns to the various national fractions of the world proletariat a different enemy and thus, at least in appearance, opposes one section of the proletariat against the other.

It is obvious that on the question of war the Marxist tradition presents neither unity nor clarity. One point was common to all the Marxist trends: the explicit refusal to condemn war as such. Marxists—notably Kautsky and Lenin—willingly paraphrased Clausewitz’s formula, according to which war merely continues the politics of peace times. War was to be judged not by the violence of its methods but by the objectives pursued through these methods.

The postwar period introduced into workingclass politics not a new idea—for the workingclass organizations, or those so-called, of our time cannot be accused of developing ideas on any subject whatsoever—but rather a new moral atmosphere. Already, in 1918, the Bolsheviks, who were hot for a revolutionary war, had had to resign themselves to making peace, not for doctrinal reasons but under the direct pressure of the common soldiers, who were no more aroused by the “spirit of 1793” when it was invoked by the Bolsheviks than they had been when Kerensky had spun orations around it. Likewise in other countries, so far as agitational slogans went, the war-battered masses forced those parties which called themselves proletarian to speak in purely pacifist terms—which didn’t prevent some from toasting the Red Army or others from voting war credits. This new tone of propaganda was, of course, never explicitly defended in terms of theory. Indeed, no one seemed to notice that it was new. But the fact is that instead of attacking war because it was imperialist, people began to attack imperialism because it made wars. As a result, the so-called Amsterdam movement, directed in theory against imperialist wars, was obliged, in order to be heard, to present itself as being against war in general. In its propaganda, the pacific inclinations of the U.S.S.R. were emphasized rather than the proletarian character—or that called such—of contemporary Russia. The formulae of the great theoreticians of socialism on the impossibility of condemning war as such were completely forgotten.

The triumph of Hitler in Germany brought to the surface, so to say, the entire inextricable tangle of the old conceptions. Peace appeared less precious now that it permitted the unspeakable horrors under which thousands of workers were groaning in the German concentration camps. The idea expressed by Engels in his 1892 article reappeared. Is not German fascism the principal enemy of the international proletariat just as Tsarist Russia was in those days? This fascism, spreading like a blotch of oil, can only be erased by force. And since the German proletariat is disarmed, it seems that only the might of the remaining democratic countries can clear away the stain.

Moreover, people said, it is not important to stop to decide whether we are dealing here with a war of defense or a “preventive war.” Did not Marx and Engels at one time try to force England to attack Russia? The coming war can no longer be thought of as a struggle between two imperialist combatants. It is a struggle between two political regimes. And just as was suggested by old Engels in 1892, when he recalled what happened one hundred years before, so it is suggested now: that a war will oblige the State to make serious concessions to the proletariat. Especially since the impending war will necessarily bring a conflict between the State and the capitalist class and, undoubtedly, also advanced measures of socialization. Who knows but the war may automatically carry to power the representatives of the proletariat?

All these considerations are beginning to create in the political circles seeking support among the propertyless a current of opinion that is more or less explicitly in favor of an active participation of the workers in a war against Germany. This current is still relatively weak, but it can easily swell. Others stick to the distinction between aggression and national defence. Still others hold fast to Lenin’s conception and others, as yet quite numerous, remain pacifists, for the most part from the force of habit. The confusion is great.

The existence of so much uncertainty and obscurity may be found surprising, and almost shameful, considering that we are dealing here with the most characteristic phenomenon of our time. It would be more surprising, however, if we arrived at anything better in face of the persisting influence of the absolutely legendary and illusory tradition of 1793 and in view of the very defective common method of evaluating each war by its supposed ends rather than by the character of the methods employed. And it would not be preferable to put the blame on the practice of violence in general, as does the pure pacifist. In each epoch war constitutes a clearly determined species of violence, the mechanism of which we must study before we can form any opinion. The materialist method consists above all in the act of examining all social acts in accordance with a procedure that seeks to discover the consequences necessarily implied in the working out of the methods employed instead of taking the avowed ends of the human acts in question at their face value. One cannot solve nor even state a problem relating to war without first taking into account the mechanism of the military struggle, that is, without first analyzing the social relationships implied by war under the given technical, economic and social conditions.

We can speak of war in general only abstractly. Modern war differs absolutely from anything designated by that name under previous regimes. On the one hand, war is only a projection of the other war which bears the name of competition and which has made of production a simple form of struggle for domination. On the other hand, all economic life now moves toward an impending war. In this inextricable mixture of the military and economic, where arms are put at the service of competition and production is put at the service of war, war merely reproduces the social relationships constituting the very structure of the existing order—but to a more acute degree.

Marx has shown forcefully that the modern method of production subordinates the workers to the instruments of labor, which are disposed of by those who do not work. He has shown how competition, knowing no other weapon than the exploitation of the workers, is transformed into a struggle of each employer against his own workmen and, in the last analysis, of the entire class of employers against their employees.

In the same way, war in our days is distinguished by the subordination of the combatants to the instruments of combat, and the armaments, the true heroes of modern warfare, as well as the men dedicated to their service, are directed by those who do not fight. And since this directing apparatus has no other way of fighting the enemy than by sending its own soldiers, under compulsion, to their death—the war of one State against another State resolves itself into a war of the State and the military apparatus against its own army.

Ultimately, modern war appears as a struggle led by all the State apparatuses and their general staffs against all men old enough to bear arms. But while the machine used in production takes from the worker only his labor power and while employers have no other weapon of constraint than dismissal—a weapon that is somewhat blunted by the existence o f the possibility for the worker to choose among different employers—each soldier is forced to sacrifice his very life to the needs of the total military machine. He is forced to do so under the threat of execution without the benefit of a trial, which the State power holds over his head. In view of this, it makes little difference whether the war is offensive or defensive, imperialist or nationalist. Every State is obliged to employ this method since the enemy also employs it.

The great error of nearly all studies of war, an error into which all socialists have fallen, has been to consider war as an episode in foreign politics, when it is especially an act of interior politics, and the most atrocious act of all.

We are not concerned here with sentimental considerations or with a superstitious respect for human life. We are concerned here with a very simple fact, that massacre is the most radical form of oppression and the soldiers do not merely expose themselves to death but are sent to death. And since every apparatus of oppression, once constituted, remains such until it is shattered, every war that places the weight of a military apparatus over the masses, forced to serve it in its maneuvres, must be considered a factor of reaction, even though it may be led and directed by revolutionists. As for the exterior effect of such a war, that is determined by the political relationships established in the interior. Arms wielded by the apparatus of the sovereign State cannot bring liberty to anybody.

That is what Robespierre came to understand and that is what was verified so brilliantly by the war of 1792, the war that gave birth to the notion of revolutionary wars.

At that time, military technique was far from reaching the degree of centralization of our days. Yet, after Frederick II, the subordination of the soldiers, charged with carrying out the war operations, to the high command, charged with coordinating these operations, was quite strict. At the time of the French Revolution, war was going to transform France, as Barrere put it, into a vast camp, and as a result give to the State apparatus the power without appeal usually held by military authority. And such was the calculation made by the Court and the Girondins in 1792. For this war—which a legend so easily accepted by socialists has made appear as a spontaneous outburst of the mass aroused against its oppressors and at the same time against the foreign tyrants menacing the mass—was in fact a provocation on the part of the Court and the upper bourgeoisie, united in a plot against the liberties of the people. They miscalculated, since the war, instead of creating that “National Unity” they hoped for, sharpened all conflicts, brought first the King and then the Girondins to the scaffold, and gave dictatorial power to the Mountain. All the same, on April 20, 1792, the day war was declared, every hope of democracy vanished, never to return; and the second of June was followed only too speedily by the ninth Thermidor, which in turn speedily produced the eighteenth Brumaire. What price power for Robespierre and his friends? Their aim was not simply to seize power, but to establish real democracy, both social and political. By the bloody irony of history, the war forced them to leave on paper the Constitution of 1793, to forge a centralized State apparatus, to conduct a murderous terror which they could not even turn against the rich, to annihilate all liberty—in a word, to smooth the road for the bourgeois, bureaucratic and military despotism of Napoleon.

But the revolutionaries of 1792 at least remained clear-headed. On the eve of his death, Saint-Just wrote this profound sentence: “Only those who are in battles win them, and only those who are powerful profit from them.”

As for Robespierre, as soon as he faced the question, he understood that war, powerless to free any foreign people (“one does not bring liberty at the point of the bayonet”), would hand over the French people to the chains of State power, a power that one could not attempt to weaken at the time when it was imperative to struggle against the foreign enemy. “War is good for military officers, for the ambitious, for money-jobbers . . . for the executive power . . . The condition of war settles for the State all other cares; one is quits with the people as soon as one gives it a war.” He foresaw the coming military despotism. He never ceased to point this out despite the apparent successes of the Revolution. He again predicted it in his death speech and left this prediction after him as a testament to which those who have since made use of his name have unfortunately paid no attention.

The history of the Russian revolution furnishes the same data, and with a striking analogy. The Soviet Constitution met the same fate as the Constitution of 1793. Like Robespierre, Lenin abandoned the democratic doctrines he assumed at the time of the revolution to establish the despotism of the apparatus of a centralized State. He was the precursor of Stalin, just as Robespierre was the precursor of Bonaparte. There is a difference. Lenin, who had prepared this domination of the State apparatus by forging a strongly centralized party, deformed his own doctrines in order to adapt them to the needs of the hour. Moreover, he was not guillotined, but became the idol of a new State religion.

The history of the Russian Revolution is the more striking because war constitutes its central problem. The revolution was made, as a movement against war, by soldiers who, feeling the government and military apparatus go to pieces over them, hastened to shake off an intolerable yoke. Invoking, with an involuntary sincerity due to his ignorance, the memory of 1792, Kerensky appealed to the soldiers to continue the war for exactly the same reasons as were given by the Girondins before. Trotsky has admirably shown how the bourgeoisie, counting on war to postpone the problem s of interior politics and to lead back the people under the yoke of State power, wanted to transform “the war till the exhaustion of the enemy into a war for the exhaustion of the Revolution.” The Bolsheviks then called for a struggle against imperialism. But it was war itself and not imperialism that was in question. They saw this well when, once in power, they were obliged to sign the peace of Brest-Litovsk. The old army was then broken up. Lenin repeated with Marx that the dictatorship of the proletariat could tolerate neither a permanent army, police or bureaucracy. But the white armies and the fear of foreign intervention soon put the whole of Russia into a state of siege. The army was then reconstituted, the election of officers suppressed, thirty thousand officers of the old regime reinstated in the cadres, the death penalty, the usual discipline and centralization reestablished. Parallel with this, came the reconstitution of the police, and the bureaucracy. We know what this military, bureaucratic and police apparatus has consequently done to the Russian people.

Revolutionary War is the grave of revolution. And it w ill be that as long as the soldiers themselves, or rather the armed citizenry, are not given the means of waging war without a directing apparatus, without police pressure, without courts martial, without punishment for deserters. Once in modern history was a war carried on in this manner—under the Commune. Everybody knows with what results. It seems that revolution engaged in war has only the choice of either succumbing under the murderous blows of counter-revolution or transforming itself into counter-revolution through the very mechanism of the military struggle.

The perspectives of a revolution seem therefore quite restricted. For can a revolution avoid war? It is, however, on this feeble chance that we must stake everything or abandon all hope. An advanced country will not encounter, in case of revolution, the difficulties which in backward Russia served as a base for the barbarous regime of Stalin. But a war of any scope will give rise to others as formidable.

For mighty reasons a war undertaken by a bourgeois State cannot but transform power into despotism and subjection into assassination. If war sometimes appears as a revolutionary factor, it is only in the sense that it constitutes an incomparable test for the functioning of the State. In contact with war, a badly organized apparatus collapses. But if the war does not end soon, or if it starts up again or if the decomposition of the State has not gone far enough, the situation results in revolutions, which, according to Marx’s formula, perfect the State apparatus instead of shattering it. That is what has always happened up to now.

In our time the difficulty developed by war to a high degree is especially that resulting from the ever growing opposition between the State apparatus and the capitalist system. The Briey affair during the last war provides us with a striking example. The last war brought to several State apparatuses a certain authority over economic matters. (This gave rise to the quite erroneous term of “War Socialism.”) Later the capitalist system returned to an almost normal manner of functioning, in spite of custom barriers, quotas and national monetary systems. There is no doubt that in the next war things will go a little farther. We know that quantity can transform itself into quality. In this sense, war can constitute a revolutionary factor in our time, but only if one wants to give the term “revolution” the meaning given to it by the Nazis. Like economic depression, a war will arouse hatred against capitalists, and this hatred, exploited for “National Unity”, will benefit the State apparatus and not the workers. Furthermore, to realize the kinship of war and fascism, one has but to recall those fascist tracts appealing to “the soldierly spirit” and “front-line socialism”. In war as in fascism, the essential “point” is the obliteration of the individual by a State bureaucracy serving a rabid fanatacism. Whatever the demagogues may say, the damage the capitalist system suffers at the hands of either of these phenomena can only still further weaken all human values.

The absurdity of an anti-fascist struggle which chooses war as its means of action thus appears quite clear. Not only would this mean to fight barbarous oppression by crushing peoples under the weight of even more barbarous massacre. It would actually mean spreading under another form the very regime that we want to suppress. It is childish to suppose that a State apparatus rendered powerful by a victorious war would lighten the oppression exercised over its own people by the enemy State apparatus. It is even more childish to suppose that the victorious State apparatus would permit a proletarian revolution to break out in the defeated country without drowning it immediately in blood. As for bourgeois democracy being annihilated by fascism a war would not do away with this threat but would reinforce and extend the causes that now render it possible.

It seems that, generally speaking, history is more and more forcing every political actor to choose between aggravating the oppression exercised by the various State apparatuses and carrying on a merciless struggle against these apparatuses in order to shatter them. Indeed, the almost insoluble difficulties presenting themselves nowadays almost justify the pure and simple abandonment of the struggle. But if we are not to renounce all action, we must understand that we can struggle against the State apparatus only inside the country. And notably in case of war, we must choose between hindering the functioning of the military machine of which we are ourselves so many cogs and blindly aiding that machine to continue to crush human lives.

Thus Karl Liebknecht’s famous words: “The main enemy is at home” take on their full significance and are revealed to be applicable to all wars in which soldiers are reduced to the condition of passive matter in the hands of a bureaucratic and military apparatus. This means that as long as the present war technique continues, these words apply to any war, absolutely speaking. And in our time we can not foresee the advent of another technique. In production as in war, the increasingly collective manner with which forces are operated has not modified the essentially individual functions of decision and management. It has only placed more and more of the hands and lives of the mass at the disposal of the commanding apparatuses.

Until we discover how to avoid in the very act of production or of fighting, the domination of an apparatus over the mass, so long every revolutionary attempt will have in it something of the hopeless. For if we do know what system of production and combat we aspire with all our heart to destroy, we do not know what acceptable system could replace it. Furthermore, every attempt at reform appears puerile in face of the blind necessities implied in the operation of the monstrous social machine. Our society resembles an immense machine that ceaselessly snatches and devours human beings and which no one knows how to master. And they who sacrifice themselves for social progress are like persons who try to catch hold of the wheels and the transmission belts in order to stop the machine and are destroyed in their attempts.

But the impotence one feels today—an impotence we should never consider permanent—does not excuse one from remaining true to one’s self, nor does it excuse capitulation to the enemy, whatever mask he may wear. Whether the mask is labelled Fascism, Democracy, or Dictatorship of the Proletariat, our great adversary remains The Apparatus—the bureaucracy, the police, the military. Not the one facing us across the frontier or the battle-lines, which is not so much our enemy as our brothers’ enemy, but the one that calls itself our protector and makes us its slaves. No matter what the circumstances, the worst betrayal will always be to subordinate ourselves to this Apparatus, and to trample underfoot, in its service, all human values in ourselves and in others.

Comments

Politics (March 1945)

Submitted by Ross Arctor on April 23, 2014

Contents:
Cover (p. 65)
Editorial (p. 65)
Comment (pp. 66-67)
Comment. Warsaw (4) (pp. 67-68)
Coser, Lewis (Louis Clair). European newsreel. The Stalintern over Europe (pp. 68-71)
Pearson, Frederick. letter from north Africa (pp. 71-72)
Farber, Marjorie. "Supermarket" (pp. 72-73)
Tucci, Nicholas. Commonnonsense (pp. 73-74)
Serge, Victor. The danger was within (I). "War Communism" (pp. 74-78)
Seldon, Edward. Popular Culture. Reviews. Freedom road; Strange fruit (pp. 78-79)
Goodman, Paul. Popular Culture. Reviews. Infants without families (pp. 79-80)
Macdonald, Dwight. Popular Culture. Reviews. "The Red and the Black" (pp. 80-81)
Macdonald, Dwight. Popular Culture. Reviews. "Fortune press analysis: labor" (p. 81)
Bazelon, David T.. Popular Culture. Reviews. "Reflections of social disorganization in the behavior of a schizophrenic patient" (p. 81)
Macdonald, Dwight. War as an institution (5). The responsability of peoples (pp. 82-93)
Roth, Lila. Books. Poland and Russia: the last quarter century (pp. 93-94)
Brumm, John. Books. Social darwinism in American thought, 1860-1915 (p. 94)
Coser, Lewis (Louis Clair.) Books. Nazi-Deutsch: a glossary of contemporary german usage (p. 94)
The intelligence office (pp. 94-95)
Corbett, Jean. The intelligence office. Letter from France (pp. 95-96)
(Pfc.) The intelligence office. Letter from Belgium (p. 96)

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Comments

Politics (April 1945)

Submitted by Ross Arctor on April 23, 2014

Contents:
Cover (p. 97)
Wilson, R. Arthur. "Why am i fighting?" (pp. 97-99)
"Why?" - Underside view (pp. 100-102)
Comment (pp. 102-105)
Marquart, Frank. letter Detroit: the strike Briggs (pp. 105-106)
Serge, Victor. The danger was within (II). Kronstadt (pp. 107-111)
Tucci, Niccolo. notes for a political dictionary (p. 112)
Macdonald, Dwight. Popular Culture. Field notes (pp. 112-116)
Calhoun, Francy. Popular Culture. Ours to reason why (p. 116)
Rainer, Dachine. Books. The private life of a master race (p. 117)
L., W.. Books. Herrn Thomas Manns neuste Wandlung (pp. 117-118)
G., E.. Books. Conscience and the State. Legal and administrative problems of conscientious objectors, 1943-1944 (p. 118)
G., E.. Books. Racial State. The German Nationalities Policy in the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia (p. 118)
Gerth, HH. "Max Weber's politics" - a rejoinder (pp. 119-120)
Greece (3) (pp. 120-123)
Horn, Samson. For a "Third Camp" position on Greece (pages 123-125)
Eastman, Max The intelligence office. Rebuttal (pp. 125-126)
Vogel, Virgil J.. The intelligence office. Suall oce blackberries - and finally (p. 126)
Woodcock, George. The intelligence office. Persecution on British anarchists (pp. 127-128)
Contributors (p. 128)

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Comments

Politics (May 1945)

Submitted by Ross Arctor on October 21, 2014

Contents:
Cover (p. 129)
Germany, 1945 The two horrors (pp. 130-131)
Germany, 1945 Letter from Sergeant (pp. 131-132)
Coser, Lewis (Louis Clair.) Germany, 1945 European newsreel: AMG in Wasteland (pp. 132-134)
Comment (pp. 134-136)
Schuyler, George S .. FDR (p. 137)
Silone, Ignazio. Nihilism (pp. 138-139)
Bell, Daniel. politics The lag of the Commonwealth (pp. 139-143)
Marquart, Frank. Reports on an MCF conference (pp. 143-144)
Bloom, Solomon F .. The last king (p. 145)
Abel, Lionel. Stalin's advocate (pp. 146-148)
Tucci, Nicholas. Commonnonsense (pp. 148-149)
Macdonald, Dwight. Free and equal. Jim Crow in uniform: current notes (pp. 150-151)
Greece (4) (pp. 151-152)
Greece (4). A British soldier writes from Greece (pages. 153-154)
Reimann, Guenter. "The Responsibility of Peoples", with a reply by Dwight Macdonald (pp. 154-156)
Gratsos, C .. Modern Texts. The memorandum Gratsos (pp. 156-159)
The intelligence office (pp. 159-160)
Coser, Lewis (Louis Clair). The intelligence office. French literary politics (pp. 159-160)
Serge, Victor. The intelligence office. Correction (p. 160)
(Pfc). The intelligence office. Generation Lost # 2 (pg. 160)
Contributors (p. 160)

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Comments

Politics (June 1945)

Submitted by Ross Arctor on October 21, 2014

Contents:
Cover (p. 161)
Macdonald, Dwight. Badoglio A japanese? (pp. 161-164)
Goodman, Paul. The Ford (p. 164)
Macdonald, Dwight. Conscription & conscientious objection (p. 165)
Triest, Frank. Conscription & conscientious objection. Conscription is the issue (pp. 165-166)
Lewis, E. John. Conscription & conscientious objection. The slow-down at Germfask (pp. 166-167)
Kepler, Roy C .. Conscription & conscientious objection. An open letter to CPS men (pp. 167-168)
Goldbloom, Maurice. The liberation of China (pages. 169-170)
Macdonald, Dwight. Germany, 1945 Current notes (pp. 170-171)
Germany, 1945 Some letters from soldier-readers (p. 172)
Levcik, Jan. Germany, 1945, Buchenwald before the war (pp. 173-174)
Coser, Lewis (Louis Clair). European newsreel (pp. 174-175)
Serge, Victor. danger was The Within (3). Vignettes of NEP (pp. 176-180)
Harlan, John Marshall. Modern Texts. The Plessy Dissent (pp. 180-182)
Vogel, Virgil J .. A note on Soviet education (pp. 182-184)
Woodcock, George. Political persecution in England (pp. 185-186)
White, MG. Books. Politics and morals (pp. 186-187)
Roth, Lila. Books. The sinews of peace (p. 187)
American soldier. The intelligence office. London, March 1945 Paris, April 1945 (pp. 187-189)
Glazer, Nathan. The intelligence office. In defense of Fromm-Horney (pp. 189-190)
Comment (pp. 190-192)
Contributors (p. 192)

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Comments

Politics (July 1945)

Submitted by Ross Arctor on October 21, 2014

Contents:
XXX. Cover (p. 193)
Tucci, Nicholas. Commonnnonsense (pp. 194-196)
Donaghue, Terence. The United Nations Non-Charter (p. 196)
Goodman, Paul. The political meaning of some recent revisions of Freud (pp. 197-203)
Bloom, Solomon F .. The responsability of Peoples - further Top discussion. The "rationality" of the death camps (pp. 203-204)
Clough, Gordon H .. The responsability of Peoples - further Top discussion. The "rationality" of the death camps (p. 204)
Macdonald, Dwight. responsability of The Peoples - further Top discussion. The "rationality" of the death camps (p. 204)
Anthony, George. responsability of The Peoples - further Top discussion. Human, all too human? (p. 205)
Macdonald, Dwight. responsability of The Peoples - further Top discussion. Human, all too human? (pp. 205-206)
Franck, Sebastian. responsability of The Peoples - further Top discussion. Moral vs. political responsability (p. 206)
Cork, Jim. responsability of The Peoples - further Top discussion. Moral vs. political responsability (p. 206)
Coser, Lewis (Louis Clair). responsability of The Peoples - further Top discussion. Moral vs. political responsability (pp. 206-207)
Macdonald, Dwight. responsability of The Peoples - further Top discussion. Moral vs. political responsability (pp. 207-209)
Worthy, Jr., William. Free and equal. My "friends" (pp. 209-210)
Kerr, Wilfred H .. Free and equal. Black boy - a review (pp. 210-211)
Popular Culture. Memo on Disney films for South America (pages. 211-213)
Popular Culture. Modesty is a luxury (p. 213)
Orlansky, Harold. Books. The japanese people - three basic books. Suye Mura, a japanese village (pp. 213-215)
Libson, Ethel. Books. The japanese people - three basic books. Year of the wild boar. An american woman in Japan (pages. 215-216)
Macdonald, Dwight. Books. The japanese people - three basic books. Japan: a short cultural history (pp. 216-217)
Macdonald, Dwight. Revolution, Ltd. - a text with comments (pp. 218-221)
The intelligence office. News of the french revolutionary Left (p. 221)
Schuyler, George S .. The intelligence office. George Schuyler's politics; reply to HJ Goldstein (pp. 221-222)
Steig, Arthur. The intelligence office. The wrong bottle (pg. 222)
The intelligence office (pp. 222-224)
Contributors (p. 224)

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Comments

Politics (August 1945)

Submitted by Ross Arctor on October 21, 2014

Contents:
Atrocities of the mind (pagg. 225-227)
Stendhal. There was a War! (pag. 228)
Coser, Lewis (Louis Clair). The peace criminals (pagg. 229-232)
Elton, Mark. Where apathy begins (pag. 232)
Malaquais, Jean. Louis Aragon, or the professional patriot (pagg. 233-235)
Oakes, Walter J.. The national scene (pagg. 235-236)
Anders, Robert. Can capitalism be humanized? Two reviews: (1) Beveridge on a free society (pagg. 237-240)
Bruggers, Arnold. Can capitalism be humanized? Two reviews: (2) Notes on Abba P. Lerner's The economics of control - Principles of welfare economy (pagg. 240-243)
The soldier reports. Germany, April 30; Austria, May 23 (pagg. 244-245)
The soldier reports. Dusseldorf, Germany (pag. 245)
H. L. (Merchant Seaman). The soldier reports. Salonika, Greece (pagg. 245-246)
The soldier reports. Philippine Islands (pag. 246)
Steig, Arthur. Popular Culture. Jazz, clock & song of our anxiety (pagg. 246-247)
Calhoun, Francy. It happened in the U.S.A.. Some footnotes on a news item (pagg. 248-249)
Macdonald, Dwight. Books. A social history of the american family: from colonial times to the present (pag. 250)
Orlansky, Harold. Books. A note on anti-semitism among negroes (pagg. 250-252)
Serge, Victor. The intelligence office. "The responsability of peoples" (pag. 252)
The intelligence office (pagg. 252-253)
Comment (pagg. 253-256)
Contributors (pag. 256)

Comments

Politics (September 1945)

Submitted by Ross Arctor on October 22, 2014

Contents:
Cover (p. 257)
Macdonald, Dwight. The Bomb (pp. 257-260)
Vogel, Virgil J .. The Bomb (2): birthplace (pp. 261-262)
Orlansky, Harold. The Bomb (3): observations from an asylum (pp. 262-263)
Laughlin, James. !!! FLASH (p. 263)
The soldier reports. American zone, Germany; Sudetenland, Czechoslovakia; Somewhere-in-Belgium; Steyr, Austria; Darmstadt, Germany (pp. 264-265)
Chiaromonte, Nicholas. Koestler, or tragedy made ​​futile (pp. 266-270)
Oakes, Walter J .. The national scene (pp. 270-271)
Coser, Lewis (Louis Clair). against Europe The Big 3 (pp. 271-273)
Labor imperialism (pp. 274-276)
Frost; Andrea. Letters from France. May 19, 1945 May 26, 1945 June 25, 1945 (pp. 276-279)
Macdonald, Dwight. Books. Half a million forgotten people: the story of the cotton textile workers; Substandard wages (p. 280)
Bazelon, David T .. Books. The revolutionary committees in the Departments of France, 1793-1794 (pp. 280-281)
Macdonald, Dwight. Books. Axis rule in occupied Europe (pg. 281)
Mills, C. Wright. Books. The sociology of literary taste (p. 281)
G., AND .. Books. The education of free men (p. 281)
G., AND .. Books. Towards a christian peace. I. A political approach. II. An economic approach (p. 281)
Comfort, Alex. The intelligence office. Conscription must be resisted! (p. 282)
The intelligence office (pp. 282-286)
Malaquais, Jean. The intelligence office. V Class. people (pp. 283-284)
Serge, Victor. The intelligence office. Dead in France (p. 285)
Donaghue, Terence. The intelligence office. Death camps known about earlier (p. 286)
Comment (pp. 286-287)
Comment. Greece (5) (pp. 287-288)
Contributors (p. 288)

Comments

Politics (October 1945)

Submitted by Ross Arctor on October 22, 2014

Contents:
Cover (p. 289)
Here's ONE thing we can do! An appeal to the readers of "politics" (p. 289)
Seldon, Edward. War as an institution (6). Military society (pp. 290-293)
Tucci, Nicholas. Commonnonsense (pp. 293-294)
The soldier reports (pp. 294-295)
Woodcock, George. Conscientious objection in England (pp. 296-297)
Jackson, J. Hampden. Ancestors (1). Proudhon (pp. 297-299)
Proudhon, Pierre-Joseph. "The general idea of the revolution in the 19th century" (pp. 299-304)
500 Red Army men, a first-hand report (pp. 304-305)
Macdonald, Nancy. Popular Culture. Are hospitals made ​​for people or vice versa? (pp. 306-308)
Jones, Jack. Popular Culture. Yaltarian cultures (pp. 308-309)
Macdonald, Dwight. Popular Culture. Memo to Mr. Luce (pp. 309-311)
Constas, Helen. Books. The dynamics of culture change; an inquiry into race relations in Africa (pages. 311-312)
Fulton, Vera. Books. The problem teacher (pp. 312-313)
Mills, C. Wright; Salter, Patricia J .. The barricade and the bedroom; with a reply by Paul Goodman (pp. 313-316)
The intelligence office. In defense of Patton-Halsey; with a reply by D. Macdonald (p. 317)
Orloff, Herbert. The intelligence office. Atomic fission and revolution (pp. 317-318)
Greenberg, Clement. The intelligence office. Blurb (p. 318)
Modlin, Jules. The intelligence office. Jazz oversimplified ?; with a reply by Arthur Steig (pp. 318-319)
Comment (pp. 319-320)
Stevens, CJ. Government of, by and for (p. 320)
Contributors (p. 313)
Here is what YOU can do: - (p. 320)

Comments

Politics (November 1945)

Submitted by Ross Arctor on October 22, 2014

Contents:
Cover (p. 321)
Weil, Simone. The Iliad or, the poem of force (pp. 321-331)
Ricardo. imperialism Labor - 2 reports from Britain. (1) The Bank of England is socialized (pp. 331-332)
Hasseck, Martin. imperialism Labor - 2 reports from Britain. (2) The dock strike (pp. 332-333)
Tucci, Nicholas. The friend of the Jews (p. 333)
Oakes, Walter J .. The national scene (pp. 333-334)
Caffi, Andrea (European). automatization of The european people (pp. 335-337)
French, Martin (Gallicus). Terror in the air: a critique of the Anglo-American bombing policy (pp. 338-342)
Individual responsability - some recent actions CO (pp. 342-344)
Glazer, Nathan. Books. The psychological frontiers of society (pp. 344-345)
Jaffe, Jacob H .. Books. The Jehovah's witnesses (pp. 345-346)
Babbitt, Milton B .. Battle cry (p. 346)
Seldon, Edward. resistance The poetry of Aragon and Eluard (pp. 347-349)
The intelligence office. Decadence of the world workingclass (p. 349)
Comment (pp. 349-351)
Contributors (p. 349)

Comments

Politics (December 1945)

Submitted by Ross Arctor on October 22, 2014

Contents:
Cover (p. 353)
Macdonald, Dwight. Starvation! America's Christmas gift to the European peoples (pp. 353-364)
Wiser, Arthur. Letter to a judge (pp. 364-365)
Frost; Andrea. The decline of the French Communists (pp. 366-367)
Bettelheim, Bruno. trials and german War re-education (pp. 368-369)
Macdonald, Dwight. roads in New Politics (p. 369)
Herberg, Will. roads in New Politics. Personalism against totalitarianism (pp. 369-374)
Caffi, Andrea (European). roads in New Politics. Towards a socialist program (pp. 374-376)
Goodman, Paul. roads in New Politics. Revolution, sociolatry and war (pp. 376-380)
Orlansky, Harold. Periodicals. "Racial and religious prejudice in everyday living" (pp. 380-381)
(Balticus). The intelligence office. The germans are clean and neat (pp. 381-382)
The intelligence office (p. 382)
Macdonald, Dwight. Reports on food packages (pp. 383-384)
This is Berysch P. (P.. 384)

Comments

1946

Submitted by Ross Arctor on October 23, 2014

Politics (January 1946)

Submitted by Ross Arctor on October 23, 2014

Contents:
Cover (p. 1)
Redman, Ben Ray. The story of John Mann (pp. 1-3)
The last days of Berlin - two letters from survivors (p. 4-7)
Mann, Georg. Morality at Nurnberg (p. 8)
Wolfe, Bertram D .. A note on Soviet place-names (pp. 8-9)
Landen, Melrick T .. The new five-hours war (p. 9)
Constas, Helen. roads in New Politics (2). A marxian critique of ideology (pp. 10-15)
Votaw, Albert. roads in New Politics (2). Toward a Personalist socialist philosophy (pp. 15-17)
Calhoun, Don. roads in New Politics (2). Non-violence and revolution (pp. 17-21)
Peck, James. roads in New Politics (2). A note on direct action (pp. 21-22)
The soldier reports. Karachi, India; Okinawa; Naples, Italy (pp. 23-24)
Swados, Harvey. Tragedy in Trieste (pp. 24-25)
Tucci, Nicholas. Commonnonsense (pp. 25-27)
Chiaromonte, Nicholas. PJ Proudhon - an uncomfortable thinker (pp. 27-29)
Macdonald, Dwight. Politicking (pp. 29-31)
The intelligence office. Hanford - Fact vs. fiction; with a reply by Virgil Vogel (pp. 31-32)
Notes on contributors (page 20).

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Comments

Politics (February 1946)

Submitted by Ross Arctor on June 2, 2017

Contents:
On the Kind of Socialism Called "Scientific", by Nicola Chiaromonte (33)
Can Socialism be Humanized?, by Frank Fisher (44)
Discussion by Virgil J. Vogel (46)
"The Mexico Clique"--a Letter from Manila (49)
A Green International?, by K. L. N. Sinha (50)
Culture in the Ruins--3 Documents from Germany:
1. "A Beginning Must be Made", by Karl Jaspers (51)
2. The Rebirth of the University, by Karl Jaspers (52)
3. Notes on the German Academic Scene (55)
THE SOLDIER REPORTS:
The G.I. Basic Personality, by Roger Reingold (57)
POPULAR CULTURE:
Hospitals--Some Letters (58)
Third Report on Packages to Europe (60)
COMMENT (61)
THE INTELLIGENCE OFFICE (62)
POLITICKING (54)

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02feb1946.pdf (2.89 MB)

Comments

Politics (March 1946)

Submitted by Ross Arctor on June 2, 2017

Cover (pag. 65)
Comment (pagg. 65-69)
Weil, Simone. War as an institution (7). Words and war (pagg. 69-73)
Woodcock, George. London letter (pagg. 74-76)
Tucci, Niccolò. Commonnonsense (pagg. 76-77)
Rodman, Selden. Exit, pursued by a bear (pag. 77)
Macdonald, Dwight. Rebellion or reconversion? (pagg. 77-78)
Spratt, Philip. Marxism and ethics (pagg. 79-84)
Jones, Jack. The mad king (pagg. 85-86)
Carlisle, Kathryn. Periodicals. "Laissez-faire, planning and ethics" (pagg. 86-87)
Carlisle, Kathryn. Periodicals. "Is Gunnar Myrdal on the right track" (pag. 87)
Carlisle, Kathryn. Periodicals. "On contemporary nihilism" (pagg. 87-88)
Carlisle, Kathryn. Periodicals. "Battle and other combatant casualities in the second world war" (pag. 88)
Carlisle, Kathryn. Periodicals. "Sociological elements in Veblen's theory" (pag. 88)
Redman, Ben Ray. Books. Animal farm: a fairy story (pagg. 88-89)
Farrell, James T.. New roads in Politics. Discussion (pagg. 89-93)
The intelligence office (pagg. 93-95)
Committee of the POUM in France. The intelligence office. An appeal for aid and solidarity (pagg. 93-94)
Politicking (pagg. 95-96)
Contributors (pag. 95)

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Comments

Politics (April 1946)

Submitted by Ross Arctor on June 3, 2017

Cover (pag. 97)
Macdonald, Dwight. New roads in Politics (4). The root is man (pagg. 97-99)
Macdonald, Dwight. New roads in Politics (4). The root is man. We need a new political vocabulary (pagg. 99-101)
Macdonald, Dwight. New roads in Politics (4). The root is man. The world we live in (pagg. 101-104)
Macdonald, Dwight. New roads in Politics (4). The root is man. The question of marxism (pagg. 104-106)
Macdonald, Dwight. New roads in Politics (4). The root is man. The mirage of the proletarian revolution (pagg. 106-109)
Macdonald, Dwight. New roads in Politics (4). The root is man. Bureaucratic collectivism: the "third alternative" (pagg. 109-112)
Macdonald, Dwight. New roads in Politics (4). The root is man. Modern war and the class struggle (pagg. 112-115)
Coser, Lewis (Louis Clair). Why the resistance failed - an outline (pagg. 116-118)
Calhoun, Don. The non-violent revolutionists (pagg. 118-119)
Bendiner, Burton. Labor leads (pagg. 119-120)
Agee, James. Dedication day - rough sketch for a moving picture (pagg. 121-125)
Delecourt, Jean (Gelo); Delecourt, Andrée (Andrea). French letter (pagg. 125-126)
Franck, Sebastian. Ancestors (2). De Tocqueville (pagg. 127-128)
Caffi, Andrea (European). Is a revolutionary war a contradiction in terms? (pagg. 128-130)
Contributors (pag. 130)
Dubitsky, A.. New roads in Politics. Discussion (pagg. 131-132)
Constas, Helen. New roads in Politics. Discussion (pagg. 132-134)
Vogel, Virgil J.. Books. The Leveller tracts, 1647-1653 (pag. 134)
The intelligence office (pagg. 134-135)
Woodcock, George. The intelligence office. William Morris's ideas (pagg. 134-135)
Packages abroad: current information (pag. 136)

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Comments

Politics (May 1946)

Submitted by Ross Arctor on June 3, 2017

Cover (pag. 137)
Whither "politics"? With a reply by the Editor (pagg. 138-142)
A. B. C.. The communists and the national question (pagg. 142-144)
Berger, Morroe. Invitation to violence, a note on british policy in Palestine (pagg. 144-145)
Goldwater, Ethel. The independent woman: a new course (pagg. 145-149)
Dwight Culler, A.. Man - piltdown to Fermi (pagg. 149-150)
Korsch, Karl. A non-dogmatic approach to marxism (pagg. 151-154)
Woodcock, George. London letter (pagg. 154-155)
Ash, Julian. Germany 1946, some impressions (pagg. 156-158)
The department of antiagriculture: letters to and from bureaucracy (pagg. 158-160)
Tolstoy, Leo. Ancestors (3). Tolstoy. Modern science (pagg. 161-164)
Tolstoy, Leo. Ancestors (3). Tolstoy. Stop and think! (pagg. 164-167)
Barbarow, George. Popular Culture. Do we need Hollywood? (pagg. 167-168)
Chiaromonte, Nicola. New roads in Politics. Discussion (pagg. 168-170)
Farrell, James T.. New roads in Politics. Discussion (pag. 170)
Macdonald, Dwight. Fourth report on packages abroad (pagg. 171-174)
Macdonald, Dwight. The intelligence office. Whitewashing the catholic church - an exchange of letters with the N. Y. Times (pagg. 174-175)
Dubitsky, Aron. The intelligence office. Reply to Helen Constas (pag. 175)
Politicking (pag. 176)
Contributors (pag. 176)
The picture on the cover (pag. 174)

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Politics (July 1946)

Submitted by Ross Arctor on June 3, 2017

Cover (pag. 177)
Macdonald, Dwight. The C. P. S. strikes (pagg. 177-180)
A. B. C.. Paris letter: the june elections (pagg. 180-182)
S., R.. Anti-semitism at sea (pag. 183)
Bazelon, David T.. New roads in Politics. Discussion. New roads and old footpaths (pagg. 184-187)
Calhoun, Don. New roads in Politics. Discussion. New roads and old footpaths: reply (pagg. 187-188)
Chiaromonte, Nicola. New roads in Politics. Discussion. New roads and old footpaths: reply (pagg. 188-189)
Franck, Sebastian. New roads in Politics. Discussion. Escapism v. marxism (pagg. 189-192)
Goldbloom, Maurice. Books. The peoples of the Soviet Union (pagg. 192-193)
Macdonald, Dwight. The root is man, part two (pagg. 194-195)
Macdonald, Dwight. The root is man, part two. Scientific method and value judgement (pagg. 195-199)
Macdonald, Dwight. The root is man, part two. Marxism and values - three texts with comments (pagg. 199-201)
Macdonald, Dwight. The root is man, part two. The idea of progress (pagg. 201-207)
Macdonald, Dwight. The root is man, part two. Toward a new concept of political action (pagg. 207-210)
Macdonald, Dwight. The root is man, part two. Five characteristics of a radical (pagg. 210-214)
The intelligence office (pagg. 214-215)
Peck, James. The intelligence office. You can strike against the Government (pagg. 215-216)
Amnesty petition (pag. 216)

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Politics (August 1946)

Submitted by Ross Arctor on June 3, 2017

Cover (pag. 217)
Macdonald, Dwight. The story of Cyprus (with notes on Labor imperialism in Greece, Egypt and Palestine) (pagg. 217-225)
Harnett, Edward. The diary of the indoctrination commentator (pagg. 225-226)
Hasseck, Martin. English letter: Bevin at Bournemouth (pagg. 226-227)
Laurat, Lucien. Why european socialists look to America (pagg. 228-229)
Tucci, Niccolò. The streetcar is man (pagg. 229-230)
Bendiner, Burton. Labor's managerial ambitions (pagg. 230-231)
Woodcock, George. The english community movement (pagg. 231-233)
Ciliga, Anton. A talk with Lenin in Stalin's prison (pagg. 234-241)
Hirsch, Helmut. What is Roosevelt College? (pagg. 241-242)
McKenzie, Dorothy. Popular Culture. The time the Lady Writer imagined me (pagg. 242-244)
Atomic bombs, Union made - some letters with a comment by the Editor (pagg. 245-247)
Dryden, Theodore. Periodicals. "Report on the negro soldier" (pagg. 247-248)
Dryden, Theodore. Periodicals. "The new russian imperialism - its economic policy and aims in the occupied countries" (pag. 248)
Dryden, Theodore. Periodicals. "The Jewish delicatessen: the evolution of an institution" (pag. 248)
Dryden, Theodore. Periodicals. "The conservative South, a political myth" (pag. 248)
Dryden, Theodore. Periodicals. "Literature as an institution" (pagg. 248-249)
Dryden, Theodore. Periodicals. "Attitudes towards Soviet Russia"; "Favorable and unfavorable attitudes toward certain enemy and allied countries" (pag. 249)
Subotsky, Milton. New roads in Politics. Discussion (pagg. 249-250)
Marquart, Frank. New roads in Politics. Discussion (pagg. 251-253)
Knight, Damon. New roads in Politics. Discussion (pagg. 253-254)
(Dely X). The intelligence office. Letter from Austria (pag. 254)
Demaziere, Albert. The intelligence office. The Blasco murder (pagg. 254-255)
The intelligence office (pag. 255)
Contributors (pag. 256)

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Politics (September 1946)

Submitted by Ross Arctor on June 3, 2017

Cover (pag. 257)
Comfort, Alex. A legend of UNO (pagg. 257-259)
Woodcock, George. Ancestors (4). William Godwin (pagg. 260-262)
Godwin, William. Extracts from "Enquiry concerning political justice" (pagg. 262-267)
Tucci, Niccolò. Letter to a friend (pagg. 267-268)
Orwell, George. "Catastrophic gradualism" (pagg. 268-270)
Pannekoek, Anton. The failure of the workingclass (pagg. 270-272)
Votaw, Albert. Resistance in C. P. S. (pagg. 272-274)
Dryden, Theodore. Periodicals. "Animadversions on naturalistic ethics" (pagg. 274-275)
Dryden, Theodore. Periodicals. "Consequences of the nationalization of the Bank of England" (pag. 275)
Dryden, Theodore. Periodicals. The "Liberal" fifth column (pagg. 275-276)
Heick, Helen. "The independent woman". Wanted: a program for the men (pag. 276)
Corkrey West, Ruth. "The independent woman". Woman in society - additional notes (pagg. 276-277)
McLuhan, Marshall. "The independent woman". Out of the castle into the counting-house (pagg. 277-279)
Goldwater, Ethel. "The independent woman". Reply (pagg. 279-280)
Calhoun, Don. Science, politics and the absolute; with a reply by Dwight Macdonald (pagg. 281-285)
Barbarow, George. Popular Culture. "Henry V" - Middlebrow Movie (pagg. 286-287)
Margoshes, Adam. Books. Hitler's professors. The part of scholarship in Germany's crimes against the jewish people (pagg. 287-288)
Mitchell, Broadus. Books. Alexander Hamilton (pagg. 288-289)
Lord, Charles. Free and equal. A note on race prejudice (pag. 289)
The intelligence office (pagg. 290-294)
Malaquais, Jean. The intelligence office. The Blasco case: reply (pag. 292)
Fifth report on packages abroad (pagg. 294-295)
Contributors (pag. 296)

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Politics (October 1946)

Submitted by Ross Arctor on June 3, 2017

Cover (pag. 297)
Macdonald, Dwight. The russian culture purge (pagg. 297-302)
Mann, Georg. Some notes on soviet science (pagg. 303-305)
Comment (pagg. 305-309)
Woodcock, George. London letter (pagg. 309-311)
Berger, Morroe. The Karachi mutinies (pagg. 312-313)
Woodcock, George. Silone's resignation (pag. 313)
The german experience - three documents (pagg. 314-319)
Macdonald, Dwight. Free and equal. Counter-attack (pagg. 319-320)
Dryden, Theodore. Periodicals. "Inflation"; "Depression round the corner" (pag. 321)
Dryden, Theodore. Periodicals. "Schizophrenic motifs in the movies" (pagg. 321-322)
Dryden, Theodore. Periodicals. "Bernard Shaw's politics" (pag. 322)
Dryden, Theodore. Periodicals. "Science in Soviet Russia" (pag. 322)
Dryden, Theodore. Periodicals. "Labor's first year" (pagg. 322-323)
Dryden, Theodore. Periodicals. "Survey of Japan's defeat" (pag. 323)
Coser, Lewis (Louis Clair). New roads in Politics. Discussion. Digging at the roots, or striking at the branches? (pagg. 323-328)
Howe, Irving. New roads in Politics. Discussion. The 13th disciple; with a reply by Dwight Macdonald (pagg. 329-335)

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Comments

Politics (November 1946)

Submitted by Ross Arctor on June 3, 2017

Nivola, Costantino. Cover (pag. 337)
Comment (pagg. 338-340)
Delecourt, Jean (Gelo); Delecourt, Andrée (Andrea). Anti-capitalist "revolution" in France (pagg. 341-344)
Smith, Don Elton. Conscientious objection is bankrupt (pagg. 345-346)
Tucci, Niccolò. Commonnonsense (pagg. 346-347)
Manheim, Ralph. Maiden flight (pagg. 347-349)
Petersen, William. Picketing and the law (pagg. 350-352)
Caffi, Andrea (European). Popular Culture. Notes on mass culture (pagg. 353-356)
Macdonald, Dwight. Popular Culture. Eisenstein's "Ivan" (pagg. 356-357)
Graves, Anna Melissa. Free and equal. A story (pag. 357)
Read, Herbert. Free and equal. South african racism (pagg. 357-358)
Blish, James. Scientific method and political action (pagg. 358-359)
Hodgson, Marshall. New Roads in Politics. Discussion (pagg. 359-361)
Macdonald, Dwight. Books. Art and social nature (pagg. 361-362)
Sixth report on packages (pag. 362)
Some letters from Germany (pagg. 362-364)
The intelligence office (pagg. 364-366)
McCarthy, Mary. The intelligence office. The Hiroshima "New Yorker" (pag. 367)
Politicking (pagg. 367-368)
Contributors (pag. 367)

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Comments

Politics (December 1946)

Submitted by Ross Arctor on June 3, 2017

Cover (pag. 369)
Weil, Simone. Factory work; with a postscript by the Editor (pagg. 369-377)
Delecourt, Jean (Gelo); Delecourt, Andrée (Andrea). French letter, the november elections (pagg. 378-380)
Woodcock, George. London letter (pagg. 380-382)
Tucci, Niccolò. Commonnonsense (pagg. 382-383)
Office of facts and figures (pag. 383)
Woodcock, George. George Orwell, 19th century liberal (pagg. 384-388)
Padmore, George. The story of Viet Nam (pagg. 388-390)
Goodman, Paul. The social format. City crowds (pagg. 390-391)
Macdonald, Dwight. The social format. Too big (pagg. 391-392)
Meyer, Peter. Popular Culture. The russian writer's dilemma (pagg. 392-393)
White, Theodore. Popular Culture. Social significance of eggs on end (pagg. 394-395)
Macdonald, Dwight. Books. Our threatened values; Politics and ethics; Science, liberty and peace (pagg. 395-396)
Peck, James. The amnesty campaign (pagg. 396-397)
Dryden, Theodore. Periodicals (pag. 397)
The intelligence office (pagg. 398-399)
Serge, Victor. The intelligence office. Soviet culture: Mandelstam (pag. 398)
Delecourt, Jean (Gelo); Delecourt, Andrée (Andrea). New roads in Politics. Discussion (pag. 399)
Finch, Roy. New roads in Politics. Discussion (pagg. 399-400)
Macdonald, Dwight. "Partisan Review" and "politics" (pagg. 400-403)
Macdonald, Dwight. The great coal strike. The man from Marx interviews the editor (pagg. 404-407)

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Comments

1947

Submitted by Ross Arctor on June 3, 2017

Politics (January 1947)

Submitted by Ross Arctor on June 3, 2017

Cover (pag. 1)
Macdonald, Dwight. The german catastrophe. We are responsible (pagg. 2-6)
Gollancz, Victor. The german catastrophe. A report on Germany (pagg. 6-7)
Franck, Sebastian. The german catastrophe. Travel notes; Fall of 1946 (pagg. 7-8)
The german catastrophe. Hunger: the Essen survey (pagg. 9-10)
The german catastrophe. Some personal letters (pagg. 10-14)
Henk, Emil. The german catastrophe. An intellectual writes (pagg. 14-15)
The german catastrophe. A socialist writes (pagg. 15-17)
The german catastrophe. "What we want is to learn" (pagg. 17-18)
The german catastrophe. "What i miss most is the Feuhrer" (pag. 18)
Goodman, Paul. The social format. Plea for a Hesiod (pagg. 19-20)
Comfort, Alex. Responsibility in science and art (pagg. 20-21)
Tucci, Niccolò. Commonnonsense (pagg. 21-22)
Caffi, Andrea (European). Violence and sociability (pagg. 23-28)
Herald, G. W.. Madame Rathenau's letter (pagg. 28-29)
Dryden, Theodore. Periodicals. "Europe debates nationalization"; "Sweden, not Russia, is model for european nationalization" (pagg. 29-30)
Dryden, Theodore. Periodicals. "Opera: music for the masses" (pagg. 29-31)
The intelligence office (pagg. 31-32)

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Politics (March-April 1947)

Submitted by Ross Arctor on June 3, 2017

Cover (pag. 33)
Macdonald, Dwight. Henry Wallace (pagg. 33-34)
Macdonald, Dwight. Henry Wallace. The Wallace myth (pagg. 34-37)
Macdonald, Dwight. Henry Wallace. The iowan background (1888-1932) (pagg. 37-38)
Macdonald, Dwight. Henry Wallace. The secretary of agriculture (1933-1940) (pagg. 38-44)
Macdonald, Dwight. Henry Wallace. The mind of Henry Wallace: close-up no. 1 (pag. 39)
Macdonald, Dwight. Henry Wallace. The mind of Henry Wallace: close-up no. 2 (pag. 43)
Goldwater, Ethel. The books of Wilhelm Reich (pagg. 44-47)
Mattick, Paul. Bolshevism and stalinism (pagg. 48-52)
Woodcock, George. London letter. The first 18 months (pagg. 52-54)
Macdonald, Dwight. Why destroy draft cards? (pagg. 54-55)
Matson, Norman. The animoid idea (pagg. 56-59)
Goodman, Paul. The social format. Occasional poetry (pagg. 59-60)
Barbarow, George. Popular Culture. B. Y. O. O. L. (pagg. 60-61)
Barbarow, George. Popular Culture. Words, words, words (pagg. 61-62)
Barbarow, George. Popular Culture. The Malraux film (pagg. 62-63)
Dryden, Theodore. Periodicals. The New Republic, Henry Wallace, Editor (pagg. 63-64)
Mears, Helen. Books. Pearl Harbor (pag. 64)
Weizenbaum, Joseph. Books. Thieves in the night (pagg. 64-65)
Constas, Helen. Books. Thieves in the night (pagg. 65-66)
Isaacs, William; Kolodny, Jules. Man is the root (pagg. 66-67)
Meyer, Peter. What was behind the coal strike - ham acting or ham? (1) (pagg. 68-70)
Macdonald, Dwight. What was behind the coal strike - ham acting or ham? (2) (pagg. 70-72)
Meyer, Peter. What was behind the coal strike - ham acting or ham? (3) (pagg. 72-73)
Macdonald, Dwight. What was behind the coal strike - ham acting or ham? (4) (pagg. 73-74)
Farber, Leslie H.. Mario and the hypnoanalyst (pagg. 74-75)
Where is Karl Fischer? (pag. 75)
Serge, Victor. The intelligence office. The communists and Viet Nam (pag. 76)
Mendelson, Saul. The intelligence office. The communists and Viet Nam (pagg. 76-77)
Padmore, George. The intelligence office. The communists and Viet Nam; postscript (pagg. 77-78)
The intelligence office (pagg. 76-79)
Mears, Helen. The intelligence office. A letter the "Times" would not print (pagg. 78-79)
Seventh report on packages (pag. 79)
Contributors (pag. 80)

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Politics (May-June 1947)

Submitted by Ross Arctor on June 3, 2017

Cover (pag. 81)
Macdonald, Nancy. They need our help (pagg. 81-85)
Macdonald, Dwight. Notes on the Truman doctrine (pagg. 85-87)
Chiaromonte, Nicola. Remarks on justice (pagg. 88-93)
Mann, Georg. Tomorrow's war and the scientists (pagg. 93-95)
Macdonald, Dwight. Henry Wallace (2) (pagg. 96-97)
Macdonald, Dwight. Henry Wallace (2). Prophet of the people's century (1941-1946) (pagg. 97-101)
Macdonald, Dwight. Henry Wallace (2). Editor of "The New Republic" (1946-?) (pagg. 101-102)
Macdonald, Dwight. Henry Wallace (2). Henry Wallace and the U. S. S. R. (pagg. 103-107)
Macdonald, Dwight. Henry Wallace (2). Corn-fed mystic (pagg. 107-110)
Macdonald, Dwight. Henry Wallace (2). A man divided against himself (pagg. 110-114)
Macdonald, Dwight. Henry Wallace (2). The political meaning of Henry Wallace (pagg. 114-116)
Macdonald, Dwight. Henry Wallace (2). Appendix: "Common Man" politics (pagg. 116-117)
Hamilton, Wallace. Hash house (pagg. 117-118)
Chiaromonte, Nicola. Rome letter (pagg. 118-119)
Woodcock, George. Dutch letter (pagg. 119-120)
Where is Karl Fischer? (2) (pag. 120)
Barbarow, George. Films (pagg. 121-122)
Macdonald, Dwight. The questionnaire: preliminary report (pagg. 122-124)
Dryden, Theodore. Periodicals. Modern Review (pag. 124)
Dryden, Theodore. Periodicals. University Observer (pagg. 124-125)
Dryden, Theodore. Periodicals. "Haganah and the terrorists" (pag. 125)
Delecourt, Jean (Gelo); Delecourt, Andrée (Andrea). A communication (pagg. 125-126)
The intelligence office (pagg. 126-127)
Politicking (pagg. 127-128)

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Politics (July-August 1947)

This issue of politics is devoted entire to French political thought, with contributions from notable figures such as Georges Bataille, Simone de Beavoir, Albert Camus, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Maurice Merleau-Ponty.

Submitted by Ross Arctor on June 3, 2017

Cover (pag. 129)
Michaux, Henri. Voice (pag. 130)
Caffi, Andrea (European). French political writing. The french condition (pagg. 130-134)
de Beauvoir, Simone. French political writing. Eye for eye (pagg. 134-140)
Camus, Albert. French political writing. Neither victims nor executioners (pagg. 141-147)
Bataille, Georges. French political writing. On Hiroshima (pagg. 147-150)
Rousset, David. French political writing. The days of our death (pagg. 151-157)
Rousset, David. French political writing. The Dotkins-Hessel-Pool affair (pagg. 157-158)
Palle, Albert. French political writing. The Petiot case (pagg. 159-161)
Sartre, Jean-Paul. French political writing. Materialism and revolution (pagg. 161-172)
Merleau-Ponty, Maurice. French political writing. Marxism and Philosophy (pagg. 173-175)
Contributors (pag. 176)

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1948

Submitted by Ross Arctor on June 3, 2017

Politics (Winter 1948)

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