Views and Comments

Archive of Views and Comments, an anarcho-syndicalist leaning publication produced out of New York by the Libertarian League from 1955 until 1966.

Submitted by Juan Conatz on July 12, 2016

Coming out of the Libertarian Book Club in New York City, Sam Dolgoff, Esther Dolgoff and Russell Blackwell started the Libertarian League in 1954. They began producing Views and Comments, an anarcho-syndicalist leaning publication. Although rooted in what was left of the aging immigrant anarchist community in the United States, the League and the journal attracted a handful of educated, younger people and its small circulation included a large proportion of universities and colleges.

The Libertarian League as a formal organization never grew much beyond the already existing circle around the Dolgoffs and Blackwell in New York City, holding one national conference in Youngstown, Ohio during the spring of 1959. The League mostly concentrated on putting out Views and Comments, as well as holding talks and events in New York City on such topics as aiding Spanish anarchists facing execution and the American labor movement.

Views and Comments mainly focused on promoting anarcho-syndicalism and libertarian socialism as political categories to transform the world, and included many articles on the international syndicalist movement, the early years of the American civil rights movement, critiques of 'business unionism' and polemics aimed at state socialism. One of the last notable publications primarily run by anarchists whose direct roots lie in the 'Old Left' of the Great Depression and Spanish civil war years, it continued publishing until 1966.

Sources

-Anarchist voices: an oral history of anarchism in America (Abridged) edited by Paul Avrich

-Unruly equality: U.S. anarchism in the 20th century by Andrew Cornell

Comments

syndicalist

7 years 9 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by syndicalist on July 12, 2016

Let me suggest that folks browse pages 74 - 78 ("The Libertarian League" Views and Comments")and 89 ("Conference of the Libertarian League" and "Demise of the Libertarian League")of Dolgoff's "Fragments".

Link: https://libcom.org/history/fragments-memoir-sam-dolgoff

syndicalist

7 years 9 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by syndicalist on July 14, 2016

Been a long time since I read a lot if these issues. I think it might be interesting to take a look at the numerous articles on the (then rising) civil rights movement

Juan Conatz

7 years 9 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by Juan Conatz on July 17, 2016

Ok, finished uploading 23 full issues of this. We have a few more, but not putting them online because they are poor scans, with some of the text and pages cut off.

syndicalist

7 years 9 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by syndicalist on July 17, 2016

^^^^. Which issues? Lemme see if I gots them in whole

Juan Conatz

7 years 9 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by Juan Conatz on July 17, 2016

A couple comments on this publication...although I found V&C more politically appealing, compared to Resistance and the few issues of Retort I've read, it was a lot dryer. That makes sense, because the latter two involved probably more educated people who were writers and artists, while V&C was apparently mostly written by 1 person (Sam Dolgoff). Design wise, too, V&C was almost like a fanzine, while Resistance and Retort are borderline professional for their time. I suppose this was one of the effects of the split between the syndicalists and bohemians in American anarchism around WW2...

^^^^. Which issues? Lemme see if I gots them in whole

40, 41, 42, 43, and 47. The scans we have cut out the bottom of the pages or the sides to where it makes it hard to read because text isn't there. I told the person who scanned them about this. Hopefully they will be able to redo them. If not, and you have the issues, would you be able to do any scans?

syndicalist

7 years 9 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by syndicalist on July 17, 2016

I'll look and see if I have any or all of these "40, 41, 42, 43, and 47." I can proll scan and email to you as attachments if I do

Steven.

7 years 8 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by Steven. on July 25, 2016

Juan Conatz

^^^^. Which issues? Lemme see if I gots them in whole

40, 41, 42, 43, and 47. The scans we have cut out the bottom of the pages or the sides to where it makes it hard to read because text isn't there. I told the person who scanned them about this. Hopefully they will be able to redo them. If not, and you have the issues, would you be able to do any scans?

yeah, hopefully the person at CIRA can redo them, so also please check if you have any of the other issues which aren't on here!

syndicalist

7 years 8 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by syndicalist on August 2, 2016

I'll email you 40 and 41 now. Others to follow another time

1955

Submitted by Juan Conatz on July 12, 2016

Comments

syndicalist

7 years 9 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by syndicalist on July 12, 2016

"Views and Comments" and the Libertarian Leauge's pamphlets were a pleasant find years before I actually met some of the participants.

Views and Comments No. 3 (May 1955)

The No. 3 (May 1955) issue of Views and Comments, an anarcho-syndicalist leaning publication produced out of New York by the Libertarian League from 1955 until 1966.

Submitted by Juan Conatz on July 12, 2016

Contents include:

-Security and slavery

-Strike bulletins

-New hope in Soviet Russia

-What we stand for

-Calendar of events

This issue digitized for libcom.org by the Centre International de Recherches sur l'Anarchisme (CIRA) in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Comments

1957

Submitted by Juan Conatz on July 13, 2016

Views and Comments No. 23 (August 1957)

The No. 23 (August 1957) issue of Views and Comments, an anarcho-syndicalist leaning publication produced out of New York by the Libertarian League from 1955 until 1966.

Submitted by Juan Conatz on July 13, 2016

Contents include:

-What we stand for

-Looking forward

-Ghana and African freedom by C.W. (Reprinted from Freedom, March 10, 1957)

-Franco's propaganda stunt lays an egg

-The Opus Dei

-Dictator Salazar's latest crimes

-Two dictators and a krock...

-Review: The biosocial nature of man by Ashley Montagu

-To feel like a man, wonderful

-More "unionism" by Seaman

-Cormorants

-The libertarian bookshelf (literature list)

This issue digitized for libcom.org by the Centre International de Recherches sur l'Anarchisme (CIRA) in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Comments

Views and Comments No. 25 (December 1957)

The No. 25 (December 1957) issue of Views and Comments, an anarcho-syndicalist leaning publication produced out of New York by the Libertarian League from 1955 until 1966.

Submitted by Juan Conatz on July 13, 2016

Contents include:

-What we stand for

-From the editors

-Voting: fight or farce?

-Little Rock

-Individualist anarchism: two points of view from Bulletin de S.I.A. (Toulouse), 2nd semester, 1957, Translated by Richard DeHaan

-1. Individualist perspectives by Emile Armand

-2. The two anarchisms by "LYG"

-The nature of Spanish fascism

-IWW pamphlet list

-The libertarian bookshelf (literature list)

This issue digitized for libcom.org by the Centre International de Recherches sur l'Anarchisme (CIRA) in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Comments

1958

Submitted by Juan Conatz on July 13, 2016

Views and Comments No. 26 (February 1958)

The No. 26 (February 1958) issue of Views and Comments, an anarcho-syndicalist leaning publication produced out of New York by the Libertarian League from 1955 until 1966.

Submitted by Juan Conatz on July 13, 2016

Contents include:

-What we stand for

-Frank Gonzalez (1893-1957)

-How to fight the vote

-Report on "unionism"

-For a constructive libertarian movement by Gaston Leval

-Special fund drive for Franco exiles

-To be or not to be? That is the question...

-Bakunin on the state

-Ghana: birth of a state

-Mad strikes again

-Freedom and Marxism

-The libertarian bookshelf (literature list)

This issue digitized for libcom.org by the Centre International de Recherches sur l'Anarchisme (CIRA) in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Comments

Views and Comments No. 27 (March 1958)

The No. 27 (March 1958) issue of Views and Comments, an anarcho-syndicalist leaning publication produced out of New York by the Libertarian League from 1955 until 1966.

Submitted by Juan Conatz on July 14, 2016

Contents include:

-Theory & tactics by Luigi Fabbri

-A Canadian newsletter by JGR

-Kronstadt

-The libertarian bookshelf (litarature list)

-Resolution on clericalism from the Montevideo continental conference of libertarian organizations

-Anarchism & organization by Gaston Leval

-Makhno and Lenin: a conversation

-Science and the state

-State unionism

-"Freedom" in Argentina

-What we stand for

This issue digitized for libcom.org by the Centre International de Recherches sur l'Anarchisme (CIRA) in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Comments

Views and Comments No. 28 (May 1958)

The No. 28 (May 1958) issue of Views and Comments, an anarcho-syndicalist leaning publication produced out of New York by the Libertarian League from 1955 until 1966.

Submitted by Juan Conatz on July 14, 2016

Contents include:

-The pot calls the kettle black

-A government of scientists?

-Inside Bulgaria (Originally appeared in A.I.T., January 1958)

-The Spanish collectives by Enrique P. Vidal

-The economic crisis by GWR

-Review: Marxism and freedom by Raya Dunayevskaya (Review by John Loeb)

-The common soldier by Eugene V. Debs

-General Motors: here we come by G.S.

-Walk for peace

-Letter to the church by J.M. Martinez (Originally appeared in Espana Libre, February 21, 1958)

-The 100th year of the Mexican Revolution (Originally appeared in Regeneration, January 1958)

-Through us alone

-Financial report

-What we stand for

This issue digitized for libcom.org by the Centre International de Recherches sur l'Anarchisme (CIRA) in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Comments

Views and Comments No. 29 (July 1958)

The No. 29 (July 1958) issue of Views and Comments, an anarcho-syndicalist leaning publication produced out of New York by the Libertarian League from 1955 until 1966.

Submitted by Juan Conatz on July 15, 2016

Contents include:

-The social impact of the recession

-How the people of Caracas struck for freedom by Voluntad

-Israeli pool scored by Orthodox Jews

-Straight from the horse's mouth...

-Principles and lessons of the Spanish Revolution (Originally appeared in Resistance)

-Slow death in Farrapal (Edited version of article by Edgart Rodriguez from Reconstruir, an Argentine libertarian monthly)

-Belize by Eustasio Beaumont W.

-Argentina locks out revolutionary union (Edited version of article originally appearing in the Bulletin of the I.W.M.A., Paris, Franch, March 1958)

-A revolutionary fighter: Nestor Makhno by Liberto Callejas (Originally appeared in Direct Action)

-The libertarian bookshelf (literature list)

-A plea for more vocal direct action by Gregory Storm

-Letter from the Bible Belt by D.R.

-Theocracy in action in Israel (Originally appeared in Jewish Newsletter, February 10, 1958)

-Financial statement

-What we stand for

This issue digitized for libcom.org by the Centre International de Recherches sur l'Anarchisme (CIRA) in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Comments

Views and Comments No. 30 (August 1958)

The No. 30 (August 1958) issue of Views and Comments, an anarcho-syndicalist leaning publication produced out of New York by the Libertarian League from 1955 until 1966.

Submitted by Juan Conatz on July 15, 2016

Contents include:

-Sidelights on the fall of a tyrant (Originally appeared in La Protesta)

-Prostitution in Portland by Reul S. Amdur

-National independence is not enough

-Answering some questions

-Practical experiments of our time: two collectives in revolutionary Spain by Gaston Leval

-The student in the United States today

-Trends in labor

-The libertarian bookshelf (litarature list)

-Financial statement

-What we stand for

This issue digitized for libcom.org by the Centre International de Recherches sur l'Anarchisme (CIRA) in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Comments

Views and Comments No. 31 (October 1958)

The No. 31 (October 1958) issue of Views and Comments, an anarcho-syndicalist leaning publication produced out of New York by the Libertarian League from 1955 until 1966.

Submitted by Juan Conatz on July 15, 2016

Contents include:

-Obituary: Rudolf Rocker (1873-1958)

-Anarchism and political action by Rudolf Rocker

-Can decent unions stay in the AFL-CIO?

-The state and/or society by Colin Ward

-From our press abroad

-Review: In the struggle for equality: the story of the Anarchist Red Cross by Boris Yelensky (Review by Sam Dolgoff)

-A look at Latin America by GWR

-The Binefar collective by Gaston Leval (Originally appeared in Resistance)

-Liberated Tunisia

-What we stand for

This issue digitized for libcom.org by the Centre International de Recherches sur l'Anarchisme (CIRA) in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Comments

Review: In the struggle for equality: the story of the Anarchist Red Cross by B. Yelensky

Sam Dolgoff's review of Boris Yelensky's book. Originally appeared in Views and Comments, n.31 (October 1958).

Submitted by Juan Conatz on December 26, 2010

Human beings make events and historians record them for the guidance of coming generations. Both are needed. The honest historian always tries to get information from original records, or if possible from the people who witnessed or took part in the events themselves. All too often the actors in the drama of history leave no written record of the parts they played. Significant pieces in the historical puzzle are lost forever and the missing parts are filled in by outright lies or unintentional distortions. In either case a false picture is projected.

Our fellow worker, Boris Yelensky, understood this and decided to set the record straight. With the help of his friends he has written a provocative little book - In The Struggle For Equality. The title is well chosen. It describes the struggle and the part he played in it. Yelensky tells about his fifty years of unceasing activity to help the victims of oppression and injustice. He dedicated his life and his book “to the Fighters for Freedom, Humanism and Justice, to those who endeavored to help these fighters by applying the principle of mutual aid.”

The book begins by sketching the history of the Russian Revolutionary movement and the part played by the Anarchists. Then Yelensky gives the history of the Anarchist Red Cross which was founded in 1905.

In telling why a special Anarchist Relief Organization became necessary he calls attention to a neglected aspect of revolutionary history - the sabotage and discrimination of many social-democrats against their fellow-prisoners and in the outside relief organizations. Of the vast sums collected all over the world, from Czarist times up to the present, very little reached the Anarchist prisoners. Yelensky quotes H. Weinstein who was jailed in Czarist times for radical activity:

“In July or August of 1906 I was placed under arrest in the city of Bialostock. When I arrived at the prison in that city, I met there, Jacob Krepleich and a friend of his, a Russian teacher; they likewise informed me that the organization which then existed in Russia, set up by the social-democrats to extend aid to all revolutionary captives regardless of political affiliation was refusing to help the Anarchists; and during the brief period that I remained in the Bialostock prison we received letters from the Grodno jail which gave confirmation of the truth of these statements.”

This discrimination still persists. As Yelensky points out in telling about the conduct of the social-democrat relief organization, The Jewish Labor Committee in the United States. It is not a pretty tale, but it had to be told.

The Anarchists have continued relief activities all this time. The bulk of this work is now carried on by the Alexander Berkman Aid Fund, which is not limited to Russian or Jewish prisoners. Aid is being sent to Spanish, Italian, Bulgarian and other prisoners all over the world. The fund also published a documentary history of Bolshevik terror against revolutionists, The Guillotine At Work, by G. P. Maximov.

In relating the relief activities, Yelensky gives us a picture of the great contribution made by the Eastern European Jews to the radical movement in this country. This book should be read not only for its factual contributions but also because it demonstrates that people of meager means in a strange country, against great obstacles, can carry on great work. It is the people who do the unglamorous but indispensable tasks, who are the true life's blood of every worthwhile movement.

This book was published by the Alexander Berkman Aid Fund, a non-profit organization and all proceeds from its sale “Innure to The Fund For Political Prisoners and Refugees”.

S.D.[Sam Dolgoff]

Taken from The Kate Sharpley Library

Comments

syndicalist

11 years 5 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by syndicalist on November 1, 2012

never saw this here before (tho read the original & have booklet)

syndicalist

7 years 9 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by syndicalist on July 10, 2016

This discrimination [against anarchists] still persists. As Yelensky points out in telling about the conduct of the social-democrat relief organization, The Jewish Labor Committee in the United States. It is not a pretty tale, but it had to be told.

The correspondence between Mollie Steimer, The Fund and the JLC is both very sad and revealing.
I am taking the liberty of extensively cutting and pasting directly from Yelensky's "In The Struggle For Equality". *

X. CONSERVATISM AND FACTIONALISM

The first post war years brought in considerable sums of money, particularly through the yearly appeals sent out by the Alexander Berkman Aid Fund and affiliated groups of the Jewish Federation. But by the third and fourth years after the end of hostilities we began to notice that the financial response to our appeals was becoming progressively smaller. It is true that in some directions our needs had decreased. The German comrades, for instance, found that they were becoming more secure materially and decided to accept no further help from us. Some of the Spaniards in the French camps were placed in public institutions, and they too declined any more assistance. But we still had on our hands a large number of people who needed help urgently, and for them, with our reduced income, we could not provide even the minimum amount we had sent before.

In this situation we were forced to think of means by which we could find additional funds, and at one of our meetings it was suggested that we should once again approach the Jewish Labor Committee in New York.35 Because of our past experience, many of us were opposed to this, but the majority thought there was nothing to be lost by making another effort. I was delegated to go to New York, and in preparation for my trip, a committee of the Alexander Berkman Aid Fund called upon the Chairman of the Chicago Jewish Labor Committee, J. Seigel. When we heard our case, Seigel agreed that I should go to New York, and he wrote a letter of recommendation to N. Chanin, the chairman of the J.L.C. Office Committee.

In February 1947, I arrived in New York and almost immediately went to see Chanin, presenting Siegel’s letter of recommendation and stating our case. When I finished, Chanin replied: “I don’t see any reason why your organization shouldn’t receive 35 [Yelensky’s note] I knew when I started to prepare this book that many of our Jewish comrades who are still taking part, for one reason or another, in the work of the Jewish Labor Committee would not be pleased by my bringing up this question. Recently a few of them approach me about it, and one in particular came to me with the argument that the Jewish Labor Committee did in fact help our comrades. To this friend, I would say that I know about the “help” in question, and later on I will give the relevant figures. At present, however, I want to remark that what the J.L.C. gave was no more than a sop to allay the growing volume of protest at its partisanship. This view was held by others than me, and in support of it I quote a letter from Alexander Shapiro, written in reply to a request of mine that he should represent the Alexander Berkman Aid Fund in an attempt to get some help from the J.L.C. “No Matter who your representative may be,” he said, “I can assure you that you will get from the Jewish Labor Committee something in the form of a bribe. I personally will not take part in this matter under any circumstances.”

help from us.” He had added that the best thing would be for a delegation representing the Alexander Berkman Aid Fund to meet the Office Committee of the J.L.C. When I heard this, I thought a miracle had happened, but I was soon to find how wrong my impression was.
After seeing Chanin I went to a meeting of the Jewish Federation in New York, and told them what happened. They decided to send a delegation, as Chanin had suggested, but, since I could stay no longer in New York, I was unable to be a member of it. A few weeks later, however, news reached Chicago from the Jewish Federation that the delegation had presented our case to the Office Committee of the Jewish Labor Committee, which had granted a sum of $2,500 for a group of our comrades in Poland to establish a printing shop. As regards the general question about funds for refugees, they promised to give early consideration to this matter.

We waited five months without receiving any news as to what the Jewish labor Committee had decided to do for our refugees, and in the end the Alexander Berkman Aid Fund asked its chairman, Irving S, Abrams, to write to the J.L.C. on the matter. He wrote to N. Chanin as follows on July 5th, 1947:

Dear Friend Chanin:

I am writing you at this time to bring to your attention a matter, which has been a source of irritation for some time and is making our situation very difficult.
Last February we delegated our Secretary, Comrade Boris Yelensky, to go to New York and solicit the Jewish Labor Committee to grant us assistance on behalf of our comrades in Europe, whose requests for assistance have been increasingly steadily.
Before Comrade Yelensky left for New York, we discussed the matter with Friend J. Siegel, and he advised us to take the matter up with you and gave Comrade Yelensky a letter of introduction to you. Comrade Yelensky reported to us that he discussed the matter with you and you suggested that a committee of our New York comrades appear before the Office Committee. We are referred the matter to the Jewish Anarchist Federation, and have been informed that a committee appeared before the Office Committee of the Jewish Labor Committee and requested assistance in our work in Poland and other European countries.

Á The Committee reports to us that the Office Committee advised them that the Jewish Labor Committee has made an allotment for Poland and would consider our request for other work. To date we have not received any word from the office of the Jewish labor Committee
A number of years ago we complained that our comrades were being slighted and engaged in considerable correspondence with New York. Nevertheless we have continued in our assistance and support of the Jewish Labor Committee.

We know that our comrades in Los Angeles, Detroit, New York and other cities have contributed liberally in work and money and the fact that I am chairman of the Workmen’s Circle Division this year indicates clearly our desire to cooperate and help in this work. However, if we did not assist in the work, our comrades in Europe would still be entitled to assistance, and I have been requested to write to you and ascertain if the Jewish Labor Committee intends to help us in our work. I am waiting your reply.

Fraternally your,
(signed) IRVING S ABRAMS

On July 14th, 1947, we received an answer from the Jewish Labor Committee. It did not come from Chanin himself, and, though we can only make conjectures about his reason for passing the task to someone else, it seems possible that he did not wish to offend Abrams, who had been very active in the work of the Jewish Labor Committee in Chicago, by a direct rebuff. The letter was actually signed by B. Tabachinsky, and I reproduce it below.

JEWISH LABOR COMMITTEE
175 E. Broadway New York, New York

July 13, 1947.

Friend Irving Abrams Alexander Berkman Relief Fund Chicago, Illinois
Dear Friend Abrams:

I write you a reply, in replace of Chanin, concerning the matter about which inquire in your letter. I want to say in that connection that your people who informed you about the matter as to how we conduct our relief work for your friends in Europe, have truly not given the correct information.

Let us try to clarify the matter for you with the fact. The group of your people in France totals- according to my knowledge since I was there- at the maximum, 25-30 persons. In the course of the year we sent them in cash $3,000.00, which we have done for no other group- not even a third of that. We provided the funds in this manners: For the Cooperative, $2,000.00, and later an additional $1,000, just as we had promised your friends in California.
We have also reached an understanding with the Manager of Local 117 to provide them with five sewing machines. The machines are already here. We need only the possibility of transporting them, and that is not within our power. It is a fact, however, that the machines are already at their disposal. If it were within our power to bring the same help to the other groups, we would be happy to do so. We provided the five machines for your friends because I have made such a promise. To be sure, I thought at that time that we would be able to gather a larger number of sewing machines, but we are keeping our promise.

With regards to packages and other forms of assistance, that is being taken care of in the same degree as to our other friends.

For the foregoing you will be able to see that the information, which you have received, is not correct. I am pleased that I can rectify the matter by presenting the facts.
with cordial regards B. TABACHINSKY Executive Secretary

The true facts are that I did not go to see Chanin in New York in order to talk to him about the cooperative workshop in Paris. What we asked, and what Tabachinsky
significantly ignores in his letter, was help for the thousands of hungry, ill-clothed and sick individuals who were on our lists of refugees.

Furthermore, the Alexander Berkman Committee had nothing to do with the cooperative. What I talked about to Chanin about, and what the New York Committee of the Jewish Federation asked for, was help for all our comrades in Europe.

The final point to be emphasized in connection with Tabachinsky’s letter is that he tries to impress upon Abrams the smallness of our movement by saying, “the group of your people in France totals- according to my knowledge, since I was there- at a maximum, 25-30 persons.” In this way he seeks to create the impression of generosity on the part of the Jewish Labor Committee for having given so much to so few people.

In fact, in Paris alone the people under our care amounted, not 25-30, but to several hundreds. And even if we leave aside this deliberate misrepresentation of facts, other small groups received, in proportion, far more than the Anarchists in France. During the period when relief was being organized, the Jewish Labor Committee collected million of dollars, of which a considerable proportion came from groups containing strong libertarian elements. Out of this great sum the Anarchists in Europe received the following help; the figures are taken from a list, which Tabachinsky sent to Abrams with his letter:

To 3 persons to come to Mexico and U.S.A.....$ 1,050
To Frydman’s child.................................................5,000 fr. For a French paper in Paris...................................$ 500
For the cooperative in Paris..................................$ 3,000 For a printing shop in Poland................................$ 2,500
Total $ 7,050 and 5,000 francs.

During this period the J.L.C. also sent about 40 food parcels to our people and paid a small amount (unspecified) for clothing to the Paris J.L.C.

It will be seen that there is in fact no provision indicating in Tabachinsky’s figures for Anarchist refugees in general, and in reality all that the Jewish Labor Committee ever did for our comrades was to help a few isolated individuals when a particular pressures happened to be brought to bear upon them. As Alexander Shapiro suggested, what this so-called non-partisan organization gave to the libertarians was “in the form of a bribe” to avoid public protest.
Our experience with the Jewish Labor Committee showed that we could get very little positive help from organizations dominated by Socialists. Even worse was the fact that Socialist influences worked against us in connection with various non-political organizations which at one time or another gave their support to the work of the Alexander Berkman Aid Fund. To give one example, the large Jewish Fraternal organization known as the Workmen’s Circle for many years endorsed at its conventions our work in helping political prisoners in Russia, and gave an annual donation to our funds. In 1939, as usual we sent an appeal telegram to The Workmen’s Circle Convention, but that year we received no donation. We accordingly sent a note of inquiry, and received this answer:

Dear Friend Yelensky:

Our donation of $300 for the Russian Prisoners was sent to Mrs. Strunsky, the Treasurer of this Fund for the past two years.
Sincerely yours,

J. BASKIN, General Secretary Workmen’s Circle
Mrs.Strunsky, it should be explained, was the head of the committee, which helped the Socialist in Russian prisons; in this way the Anarchists were squeezed entirely out of the help given by the Workmen’s Circle conventions.

In 1944, for the sake of the record, the Alexander Berkman Aid Fund made a further attempt to gain endorsement of our work from the Workmen’s Circle, and also a donation, as in the past. This time we received the following letter:

THE WORKMEN’S CIRCLE
175 East Broadway New York, N.Y.

January 10, 1944.

Alexander Berkman Aid Fund Committee 2422 North Halsted Street,
Chicago, Illinois

Dear Friends:
We are in receipt of your letter asking for an endorsement of you Committee to the Branches of the Workmen’s Circle and also for a direct contribution for purposes indicating in your letter.
We wish to inform you that since The Workmen’s Circle is an integral part of the Jewish Labor Committee and all our work for the aid of refugees is done through that Committee, we have therefore referred your request to them for consideration.
Fraternally yours,
Na tional Executive Committee Workmen’s Circle
J. BASKIN, General Secretary

Once again we had been passed over in favor of a Socialist-dominated organization- and that by The Workmen’s Circle, of whose rank-and-file membership at least 95 percent had no connection with social-democratic political parties.

Later on we had a similar experience with the International Ladies’ Garment Workers’ Union. Originally the Union was friendly, as can be seen from the following extract from the Proceedings of the 2 6th Convention of the Union in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1947:
Delegate Jacob Katz appeared before your Committee to ask for financial assistance to the Alexander Berkman Fund, an organization that is rendering assistance to individuals needy of the labor movement all over the world.

The record of our International indicates that this fund is listed among the many organizations who have heretofore received financial assistance. Your Committee, therefore, refers this matter to the incoming GEB for continued support.

The same decision applies to the request by the same delegate for assistance to the International Aid Fund. an associate organization of the Alexander Berkman Aid Fund.
(Upon motion this portion of the report was adopted)

Until t he Chicago Convention of the Union in 1953 we received donations from the ILGWU funds. At the Convention the financial assistance ceased, and, though we wrote several times to David Dubinsky, the President of the Union, he did not see fit to reply to our letter. In the days of bitter strike when the ILGWU was organized many members of our Jewish movement took an active part in its formation, and to this day there are a few old anarchists among its vice-presidents and its top-level executives. But now, when it comes to helping anarchists outside its ranks, the Union chooses to ignore our appeals.

If space allowed, I could bring out many more facts which would bear upon this matter of the exclusion of our activities form aid they had formerly gained from the organized labor movement, but I think what I have quoted is sufficient to show how people who formerly used our movement and its members are now glad to ignore it. The unfortunate thing is that so many of people, for one reason or another, still give their help to organizations which are hostile to libertarian ideals.

We were grateful for the help, but we still felt that Anarchists were not receiving their full share of the millions of relief money that had been collected, much of it with libertarian help. Perhaps this is a promise of the day when solidarity among radicals will be revived, and it will no longer be necessary to have their own relief program; it is evident to us that this day has not yet arrived.

Actually we are passing through a conservative period, which has made it difficult for all radicals. The general decline of our funds cannot have been due to lack of financial means, nor do we think that our efforts have been weaker, or the need less.
While we hope for a return to more favorable conditions, the time may have come for a rethinking of the needs and opportunities of the workers, and of our mission and tactics. May the decline of the program of the past make way for a new and united radicalism of greater vision, freedom, and strength.

In addition, by 1953 Ladies Garment Workers Unions (ILGWU) halting of funds to aid anarchists. The JLC, heavily dominated by the ILGWU and other needle trades unions

Yelensky further writes:

"Until t he Chicago Convention of the Union in 1953 we received donations from the ILGWU funds. At the Convention the financial assistance ceased, and, though we wrote several times to David Dubinsky, the President of the Union, he did not see fit to reply to our letter. In the days of bitter strike when the ILGWU was organized many members of our Jewish movement took an active part in its formation, and to this day there are a few old anarchists among its vice-presidents and its top-level executives. But now, when it comes to helping anarchists outside its ranks, the Union chooses to ignore our appeals."

* "The Struggle for Equality: The History of the Anarchist Red Cross" By Boris Yelensky

ABCF edition with intro comments by Matthew Hart --- http://www.abcf.net/la/pdfs/layelensky.pdf

Views and Comments No. 32 (November 1958)

The No. 32 (November 1958) issue of Views and Comments, an anarcho-syndicalist leaning publication produced out of New York by the Libertarian League from 1955 until 1966.

Submitted by Juan Conatz on July 15, 2016

Contents include:

-Education in the United States by GWR

-The power of prayer (Originally appeared in The Secularlist, Chicago)

-"Thou shall not kill"

-Bedfellows and strange politics

-The popular intelligence in the Spanish Revolution by Gaston Leval

-Laying the ghost of 1789 once again

-Act now on missile bases by Walter Goraly (Originally appeared in The Peacemaker, October 4, 1958)

-The ultimate in "elitism"

-The fascist Pope

-Peace walk in Minneapolis by CC

-Song of the bureaucrat by Factory Worker (Originally appeared in Correspondence, Detroit, MI)

-Hail "The people's benefactor" by John Francis Putnam (Originally appeared in The Realist)

-The Portland (Oregon) labor front

-For justice in Bulgaria by Norwegian Syndicalist Workers Federation

-Financial statement

-What we stand for

This issue digitized for libcom.org by the Centre International de Recherches sur l'Anarchisme (CIRA) in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Comments

1959

Submitted by Juan Conatz on July 16, 2016

Views and Comments No. 33 (January 1959)

The No. 33 (January 1959) issue of Views and Comments, an anarcho-syndicalist leaning publication produced out of New York by the Libertarian League from 1955 until 1966.

Submitted by Juan Conatz on July 16, 2016

Contents include:

-Drenched peace pickets defy Air Force hoses by Alan Graham (Originally appeared in the Industrial Worker, January 5, 1959)

-Transport boycotts by J.M.

-The moral factor by Gaston Leval

-Urgent and important! by Union of Bulgarian Anarchists in Exile

-The martyrdom of Manol Vassev

-Poem: Walking the brink or bet your life by D.B. Barron (Quoted from Chicago Darrow Club, reprinted from the Industrial Worker)

-Review: We who would not kill by Jim Peck (Review by E.J.M.)

-Pigs pay for cross (Originally appeared in The Liberal, September 1958)

-The cop and the people on the street by LL.B. (Originally appeared in Correspondence, June 1958)

-Labor and automation

-A youth's commentary on "democracy" in action by Randolph Francis

-Delinquency: but is it juvenile? by D.H.

-The degeneration of the French social democracy by Pierre Galmer

-A letter from Algeria (Originally appeared in La Révolution prolétarienne, Paris, November 1958)

-Manifesto of the Anarchist Federation of Mexico

-Cooperation: black clubs (Originally appeared in Correspondence, June 1958)

-Whose payroll is he on, anyway?

-What we stand for

This issue digitized for libcom.org by the Centre International de Recherches sur l'Anarchisme (CIRA) in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Comments

syndicalist

7 years 9 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by syndicalist on July 16, 2016

In this issue there's an article entitled "The martyrdom of Manol Vassev".... Nick Health has written a short bio of the murdered Bulgarian comrade. Here's the link: https://libcom.org/history/articles/1898-1958-manol-vassev-sotirov

syndicalist

7 years 9 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by syndicalist on July 16, 2016

This article was actually scoped from the Detroit Johnson-Forest Tendency (actually the Correspondence Publishing Group *) publication "Correspondence"

"-Cooperation: black clubs (Originally appeared in Correspondence, June 1958)"

* As background: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Correspondence_Publishing_Committee

Views and Comments No. 34 (April 1959)

The No. 34 (April 1959) issue of Views and Comments, an anarcho-syndicalist leaning publication produced out of New York by the Libertarian League from 1955 until 1966.

Submitted by Juan Conatz on July 16, 2016

Contents include:

-Negro struggle sharpens

-Tyranny shaken in the Caribbean

-The trojan horse carries the cross to labor's camp

-The anti-war movement: illusions and delusions

-Libertarian youth group formed in N.Y.

-Working class internationalism by Germinal Esgleas

-The military :mind" and our children by Alan Graham

-Boris Pasternak and C. Vega Alvarez

-Organization and the individual conscience by George Balkansky

-Correspondence from Argentina by Jorge Ballesteros

-Is there a god?: a rationalist's viewpoint by Andy Vena (Originally appeared in The Liberal, August 1958)

-Libertarian morality by J.M.

-The libertarian bookshelf (literature list)

-What we stand for

This issue digitized for libcom.org by the Centre International de Recherches sur l'Anarchisme (CIRA) in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Comments

Views and Comments No. 35 (May 1959)

The No. 35 (May 1959) issue of Views and Comments, an anarcho-syndicalist leaning publication produced out of New York by the Libertarian League from 1955 until 1966.

Submitted by Juan Conatz on July 16, 2016

Contents include:

-The "communes" of Communist China

-Second youth march for integrated schools

-On the class war front: solidarity in New Jersey; Grooming the crown princes; Hooray for progress!

-Do it yourself

-Nationalism vs. freedom

-Worker's control: a review

-Spain's labor underground fights on

-Work and save

-Franco's jails: American's responsibility

-You can't take it with you

-It happens...

-What we stand for

This issue digitized for libcom.org by the Centre International de Recherches sur l'Anarchisme (CIRA) in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Comments

Views and Comments No. 36 (November 1959)

The No. 36 (November 1959) issue of Views and Comments, an anarcho-syndicalist leaning publication produced out of New York by the Libertarian League from 1955 until 1966.

Submitted by Juan Conatz on July 16, 2016

Contents include:

-We view & comment by Russell Blackwell

-Review: Of dust and stars: selected poems by Vernon Ward (Review by RDE)

-Pacifist action by Walter Gormly

-The King Kong Defense System

-The anti-Peronist psychosis in Argentina by J. Ballesteros

-The libertarian bookshelf (literature list)

-Don't walk on the grass either by Dave Mason

-Human automations by Sheldon J. Deretchin

-Rank...and a little file by Dave Mason

-Finances

-What we stand for

This issue digitized for libcom.org by the Centre International de Recherches sur l'Anarchisme (CIRA) in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Comments

1960

Submitted by Juan Conatz on July 16, 2016

Views and Comments No. 37 (February 1960)

The No. 37 (February 1960) issue of Views and Comments, an anarcho-syndicalist leaning publication produced out of New York by the Libertarian League from 1955 until 1966.

Submitted by Juan Conatz on July 16, 2016

Contents include:

-Steel...and the crisis in American labor by S.W. (Sam Dolgoff)

-Poem: Laugh if you kill by Lilith Lorraine (Reprinted from The American Rationalist, January-February 1959)

-Dixie

-History of "utopia" by Maristo

-Concerning anarchist morality by Errico Malatesta

-Workers councils by Balkansky

-Memo to a tax collector (Reprinted from The Independent, January 1959)

-Two versions (Excerpts from Astronomy made simple by Meir H. Degani, Sc. D.)

-What we stand for

This issue digitized for libcom.org by the Centre International de Recherches sur l'Anarchisme (CIRA) in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Comments

Views and Comments No. 38 (May 1960)

The No. 38 (May 1960) issue of Views and Comments, an anarcho-syndicalist leaning publication produced out of New York by the Libertarian League from 1955 until 1966.

Submitted by Juan Conatz on July 16, 2016

Contents include:

-The F.A.I. lives on...in spirit and in action

-Libertarian anti-statism (Reprinted from Accion Libertaria, No. 166, Buenos Aires, Argentina)

-On the nature of the state by Errico Malatesta

-The "civil rights" struggle by E.W.

-Eyewitness account from Houston by H.W.

-Lunch counter demonstrations in Nashville by J.S.

-Terror? (Reprinted from Newsweek)

-Liberty and social rights by Rudolf Rocker

-Reflections on the steel strike settlement by S.W. (Sam Dolgoff)

-Review: How labour governed by Syndicalist Workers Federation (Review by by S.W. a.k.a. Sam Dolgoff)

-Life among the savages by Anarcho-Cynicalist

-Reflections on the moral problem

-...his eyes was on the sparrow! (Reprinted from the New York Times, May 4, 1959)

-A letter from Madrid (Reprinted from CNT, December 27, 1959)

-Where was God? (Reprinted from The Liberal, 1959)

-What we stand for

This issue digitized for libcom.org by the Centre International de Recherches sur l'Anarchisme (CIRA) in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Comments

Views and Comments No. 39 (August 1960)

The No. 39 (August 1960) issue of Views and Comments, an anarcho-syndicalist leaning publication produced out of New York by the Libertarian League from 1955 until 1966.

Submitted by Juan Conatz on July 16, 2016

Contents include:

-Cops riot as inquisition melts by B.B.

-The labor party ullusion by S.W. (Sam Dolgoff)

-The "civil rights" struggle

-Civilian military education in Russia

-Literature list

-Albert Camus: on the values of liberty (Translated and reprinted from Reconstruir)

-Political prisoners in Franco's jails (Reprinted from Espana Libre)

-The social basis of anarchism

-In memory of Jose Lopez Rios

-South Africa: strike action can end apartheid

-First Libertarian League conference

-Social note

-Financial report

-What we stand for

This issue digitized for libcom.org by the Centre International de Recherches sur l'Anarchisme (CIRA) in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Comments

1961

Submitted by Juan Conatz on September 13, 2016

Views and Comments No. 40 (January-February 1961)

The No. 40 (January-February 1961) issue of Views and Comments, an anarcho-syndicalist leaning publication produced out of New York by the Libertarian League from 1955 until 1966.

Submitted by Juan Conatz on September 13, 2016

Contents include:

-Shafted again!

-Literature list

-For the Cuban Revolution

-Statement of principles of the Libertarian Syndicalist Group of Cuba

-Cuban labor in a strait-jacket

-Correction

-Report showing youth opposition to draft "not available"

-Pith & vinegar

-After the G.E. strike by S.W. (a.k.a. Sam Dolgoff)

-On art & craftsmanship

-Bakunin and Marx

-Crime & punishment

-Editorial note

-On the welfare state

-What we stand for

This issue scanned and provided by New York/New Jersey Workers Solidarity Alliance archives

Comments

Views and Comments No. 41 (May-June 1961)

The No. 41 (May-June 1961) issue of Views and Comments, an anarcho-syndicalist leaning publication produced out of New York by the Libertarian League from 1955 until 1966.

Submitted by Juan Conatz on September 13, 2016

Contents include:

-For the Cuban Revolution

-Against totalitarianism, against both imperialisms, for freedom in Cuba

-Review: Listen, Yankee by C. Wright Mills (Review by Russell Blackwell)

-The libertarian bookshelf

-Mr. Goldberg takes over for labor, or does he? by Sam Weiner (a.k.a. Sam Dolgoff)

-In Mao Tse Tung's "celestial" hell: commentary on an eyewitness who did not see by S.W. (a.k.a. Sam Dolgoff)

-The American Revolution by Betty Blanck

-Review: Anarchism by Paul Eltzbacher (Review by X.Y.Z.)

-Pith & vinegar

This issue scanned and provided by New York/New Jersey Workers Solidarity Alliance archives

Comments

Steven.

7 years 7 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by Steven. on September 13, 2016

The PDF attached here only has the front page scanned

Juan Conatz

7 years 7 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by Juan Conatz on September 13, 2016

Oops, I attached the wrong file. Fixed now.

1963

Submitted by Juan Conatz on July 16, 2016

Views and Comments No. 44 (April 1963)

The No. 44 (April 1963) issue of Views and Comments, an anarcho-syndicalist leaning publication produced out of New York by the Libertarian League from 1955 until 1966.

Submitted by Juan Conatz on July 16, 2016

Contents include:

-Spain again: for a revolutionary solution

-Comments from the Spanish libertarian press

- I by Cayetano Zaplana (Reprinted from Espoir, September 29, 1962)

- II (Reprinted from Le Combat Syndicaliste, July 26, 1962)

- III (Reprinted from leaflet of the "Friends of Durruti". July 1962)

- IV (Reprinted from report of the Intercontinental Conference of the Spanish Libertarian Movement in Exile, April 1947)

-Laughter in court

-America's "free labor movement" and the welfare state by S.W. (Sam Dolgoff)

-Secret brinkmanship or "democracy" in practice

-The libertarian bookshelf (literature list)

-Cuba: for an end to muddled thinking

-Fighters against Batista in Castro's prisons

-Collaborators of Batista in Castro's government

-Review: The Kronstadt rebellion by Emanuel Pollack (Review by D.S.)

-Review: The workers opposition by Alexandra Kollontai

-Review: The Chinese anarchist movement by Robert A. Scalapino and George T. Yu (Review by E.W.)

-Obituary: Sheldon Deretchin 1933-1962 by B.B.

-"Homo Sovieticus" comes of age by G. Hu

-Obituary: Nicholas Stoinoff 1862-1963 by R.B.

-What we stand for

This issue digitized for libcom.org by the Centre International de Recherches sur l'Anarchisme (CIRA) in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Comments

Views and Comments No. 45 (Fall 1963)

The No. 45 (Fall 1963) issue of Views and Comments, an anarcho-syndicalist leaning publication produced out of New York by the Libertarian League from 1955 until 1966.

Submitted by Juan Conatz on July 16, 2016

Contents include:

-Leaders and led in the negro revolt

-Spanish chronicle

-Buggering the worker from both ends by Spartacus

-Ghana: nationalists in the golden bed

-The church and the radicals

-From the libertarian press: Argentina

-From the libertarian press: Brazil

-Anarchist organization & individual freedom by Luigi Fabbri

-George Woodcock: a muddled history of anarchism by Sam Wiener (Sam Dolgoff)

-Review: The bomb, direct action and the state by Syndicalist Workers Federation

-Review: Marxism, freedom and the state by Michael Bakunin (Review by W.S.)

-Review: Marx, Proudhon and European socialism by J. Hampden Jackson (Review by W.S.)

-Libertarian notebook

-What we stand for

This issue digitized for libcom.org by the Centre International de Recherches sur l'Anarchisme (CIRA) in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Files

Comments

1964

Submitted by Juan Conatz on July 16, 2016

Views and Comments No. 46 (Spring 1964)

The No. 46 (Spring 1964) issue of Views and Comments, an anarcho-syndicalist leaning publication produced out of New York by the Libertarian League from 1955 until 1966.

Submitted by Juan Conatz on July 17, 2016

Contents include:

-"Strangers in paradise", indeed! by Jonathan Leake

-Rent strike NYC by Walter Coy

-Anarchism and law by (Excerpts of "Anarchism" by Alexei Borovoi)

-The libertarian bookshelf (literature list)

-Review: The desert revolution: Baja California, 1911 by Lloyd L. Baisdell (Review by Gee)

-British syndicalists look up

-Cuba today: arms & land by W.S.

-What we stand for

This issue digitized for libcom.org by the Centre International de Recherches sur l'Anarchisme (CIRA) in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Comments

syndicalist

7 years 9 months ago

In reply to by libcom.org

Submitted by syndicalist on July 18, 2016

Solved comrades note SWF mention, page 19

1965

Submitted by Juan Conatz on July 17, 2016

Views and Comments No. 48 (Winter 1965)

The No. 48 (Winter 1965) issue of Views and Comments, an anarcho-syndicalist leaning publication produced out of New York by the Libertarian League from 1955 until 1966.

Submitted by Juan Conatz on July 17, 2016

Contents include:

-Mobilization for Youth under fire by Walter Coy

-Rumblings inside the UAW by W.

-Long night in Bulgaria

-A revolutionary centennial by Sam Weiner (Sam Dolgoff)

-Latin American notes: Cuban libertarians meet; Argentina; Brazil

-Review: Soviet communes by Robert G. Wesson (Review by Gee)

-Literature list

-What we stand for

This issue digitized for libcom.org by the Centre International de Recherches sur l'Anarchisme (CIRA) in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Comments

Views and Comments No. 49 (Spring 1965)

The No. 49 (Spring 1965) issue of Views and Comments, an anarcho-syndicalist leaning publication produced out of New York by the Libertarian League from 1955 until 1966.

Submitted by Juan Conatz on July 17, 2016

Contents include:

-SNCC and the vote in dixie by P.K.

-Cuba: revolution and counter-revolution (Translated and reprinted from Accion Libertaria)

-Who were the Cuban anarchists? by R.B. (Russell Blackwell)

-Labor notes: Steel; Longshoremen; New York welfare workers by S.W. (Sam Dolgoff)

-The libertarian bookshelf (literature list)

-Congo: greenbacks and black blood by Gee.

-Review: Class and class conflict in industrial society by Ralk Dahrendorf (Review by Walter Coy)

-Review: Rebel voices: an IWW anthology edited by Joyce L. Kornbluh (Review by E.W.)

-Contributions recieved

-What we stand for

This issue digitized for libcom.org by the Centre International de Recherches sur l'Anarchisme (CIRA) in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Comments

Towards anarchism No. 50 (Summer 1965)

The No. 50 (Summer 1965) issue of Towards Anarchism (formerly Views & Comments), an anarcho-syndicalist leaning publication produced out of New York by the Libertarian League from 1955 until 1966.

Submitted by Juan Conatz on July 17, 2016

Contents include:

-We accuse: Johnson, his Pentagon and CIA by W.S.

-The fallacy of relying on "democracy"

-Autonomy and federalism by S.W. (Sam Dolgoff)

-Autonomy & social movements by Walter Coy

-An appeal

-Men, machines and production by Jonathan Leake

-For workers' control by Sam Weiner (Sam Dolgoff)

-Spain: the rising tide of revolt (Reprinted from Information Bulletin of the Iberian Libertarian Youth)

-Some thoughts on moral persuasion (Excerpts from "Moral Coercion" by Ricardo Mella)

-Cuba: resolution of the Italian Anarchist Federation

-Revolution... by Errico Malatesta

-Argentina

-The libertarian bookshelf (literature list)

-What we stand for

This issue digitized for libcom.org by the Centre International de Recherches sur l'Anarchisme (CIRA) in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Comments